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Paul's Damascus Road Images

Updated on January 30, 2014

From Persecutor to Apostle

The Conversion of Paul the Apostle was an event which led him to cease persecuting early Christians and to become a follower of Jesus.

The Stoning of Steven

The first painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt van Rijn, painted in 1625 at the age of 19.  Location: The Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. Starcky, Emmanuel (1990). Rembrandt. Hazan. p. 45.  ISBN 2-85025-212-3.
The first painting by Dutch artist Rembrandt van Rijn, painted in 1625 at the age of 19. Location: The Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon. Starcky, Emmanuel (1990). Rembrandt. Hazan. p. 45. ISBN 2-85025-212-3. | Source

Book of Acts 9:1-27 The Message

Source

Introduction of Saul (Acts: 7:58)

Yelling and hissing, the mob drowned him (Steven) out. Now in full stampede, they dragged him (Steven) out of town and pelted him with rocks. The ringleaders took off their coats and asked a young man named Saul to watch them. (Paul observes the killing of Steven)

The Message (paraphrased)

Setting the Stage

(Circa AD 33-36) ......... Saul (A Pharisee: An influential Jewish leader) was breathing down the necks of the disciples of Jesus. Out for the kill, he went to the Chief Priest (in Jerusalem) and got arrest warrants to take to the meeting places in Damascus (now in Syria) so that if he found any "Christians" there, whether men or women, he could arrest them and bring them to Jerusalem.

(The Message, paraphrased)

Jerusalem to Damascus Road

Source

Acts 9:3-4 The Message (MSG)

Saul set off. When he got to the outskirts of Damascus, he was suddenly dazed by a blinding flash of light. As he fell to the ground, he heard a voice: “Saul, Saul, why are you out to get me?”

A Blinding Flash of Light

Conversion of St. Paul By Michelangelo Buonarroti  (1542-1545) Fresco Pauline  Chapel, Vatican, Europe
Conversion of St. Paul By Michelangelo Buonarroti (1542-1545) Fresco Pauline Chapel, Vatican, Europe | Source

Inset Zoom of Saul's Face

Conversion of St. Paul By Michelangelo Buonarroti  (1542-1545)  Pauline  Chapel, Vatican, Europe (Inset)
Conversion of St. Paul By Michelangelo Buonarroti (1542-1545) Pauline Chapel, Vatican, Europe (Inset) | Source

Saul's Blindness Emphasized

A zoom of this Fresco (at The Vatican in Rome.) depicting the aftermath of Saul's literal fall focuses on the closing of Saul's eyes and subsequent blindness.

Another Impression of the Blindness of Saul

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - The Conversion of St. Paul (1600) Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio - The Conversion of St. Paul (1600) Odescalchi Balbi Collection, Rome | Source
Source

Saul's blindness was a result of his inability to see and understand that Jesus was and is God in human form. His lack of sight would not be changed until he fully understood and believed this truth.

Video of The Conversion Taken from "Anno Domini" (popular TV series from the 80's).

Saul to Paul Simplified: Summit Children Ministries

A Different Portrayal

Bronze statue by sculpture Bruce Denny,  On display at Soho Square, London.
Bronze statue by sculpture Bruce Denny, On display at Soho Square, London. | Source

The AH Hah Moment!

Saul to Paul in Damascus

Jesus has appeared to Saul on the road to Damascus. He knows that Jesus is The Savior and Messiah. His life is changed.

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Source
The Missionary Journeys of Paul The Apostle
The Missionary Journeys of Paul The Apostle | Source

Sight Restored

In Damascus, Ananias restores the sight of Paul through Jesus. Paul is now a believer and a Jesus disciple

The Transformation of Paul?

Why would Saul, the Persecutor and murderer of Christians, change to Paul The Apostle of Christ. Make three arduous and dangerous missionary journeys to inform strangers about the Gospel of Jesus Christ a crucified, dead, Jewish teacher.

Paul suffered muggings, floggings, shipwrecks, stoning, dragging, snake bite, cold, nakedness, imprisonment, loneliness, thirst, hunger, and deformity to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to strangers throughout the known world of that time.


Decapitation in Rome

Finally, in Rome, he was beheaded because of his faith in Jesus Christ and Him crucified.

Decapitation of Saint Paul Simonet, 1887
Decapitation of Saint Paul Simonet, 1887 | Source

What is the significance of Paul's conversion to Christianity for the world? Is this just another myth made up by fanatics or writers like Homer or Virgil about some hero's strange wanderings around the known world?

Would Paul have been willing to suffer so many misfortunes and ultimately be sentenced to a criminal's death unless he had really met the resurrected Jesus Christ on the road to Damascus?

© 2013 David Carl

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    • David Carl profile image
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      David Carl 3 years ago from New York

      DDE.

      Thank you for reading my hub and for your comments today and a few days ago. I haven't written anything in about three weeks. Your encouragement is especially meaningful right now. I will focus tonight and get going again on the one that I started in January.

      God bless

      David Carl

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Paul's Damascus Road Images is an awesome hub with such great photos and presented with interesting thoughts.