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Photos that Could Prove the Existence of Ghosts!

Updated on March 21, 2015
In 1959, Mabel Chinnery spent the day visiting her mother's grave. Afterwards she took this photo of her husband waiting in their car. The ghostly image in the back seat is believed to be her mother!
In 1959, Mabel Chinnery spent the day visiting her mother's grave. Afterwards she took this photo of her husband waiting in their car. The ghostly image in the back seat is believed to be her mother!

The Ghost in the Car

This spooky photo was taken in 1959 by Mabel Chinnery. She had just spent a few moments tending to her mothers grave and took this photo of her husband wait in his car to use up the reel before sending it to be developed. When they received the photos back they discovered that her husband wasn’t alone in the car as they thought. There was an apparition sitting in the back seat – an apparition that looked scarily like her dead mother! Was she looking over her daughter, returning the compliment for Mabel looking after her last resting place? A photographic expert who examined the original negative believed that the photo was real, "I stake my reputation on the fact that the picture is genuine," he exclaimed.

Taken in 1963 at Newby Church in England by the Reverend K.F. Lord. This ghost is believed to possibly be a monk.
Taken in 1963 at Newby Church in England by the Reverend K.F. Lord. This ghost is believed to possibly be a monk.

The Monk of Newby Church

A surprisingly large amount of ghost photographs have been taken by ‘men of the cloth’ over the years and this one by the Reverend K.F. Lord must rank as one of the most famous. The ghoul in the photo has been most likened to a monk and his often now referred to by that name. The image was taken in 1963 at Newby Church in North Yorkshire, England and although it has repeatedly been tested and declared to show no trickery or double exposure, still generates much controversy, properly because the image captured looks so much like what you’d expect from a modern horror film – it has also been estimated at being at least 9 feet tall!
Unusually, apart from this one photo, Newby church has hand no reports of any haunting before or after, either in photographic form or in sightings.

This photo was taken in Lord Combermere's home in 1881. At the same time as this photo was taken his funeral was taking place four miles away.
This photo was taken in Lord Combermere's home in 1881. At the same time as this photo was taken his funeral was taking place four miles away.

The Ghost of Lord Combermere

Colonel Wellington Henry Stapleton-Cotton, the 2nd Viscount Combermere died in December 1891 after being hit by a horse-drawn carriage, he was 73.
While the home of Lord Combermere was empty for his funeral four miles away, his sister took the opportunity to take a photo of the library using a camera with it’s shutter open for an hour before joining the burial of her brother. When the plate was developed, it showed a transparent image of a man, very similar to the dead Viscount sitting in his favourite chair.
It had been suggested that one of the servants could have come into the room and briefly sat on the chair causing the ‘ghost’ but this was refuted by the household as they were all away at the funeral.

The ghost of Raynham Hall has been sighted since at least 1835 and is believed to be an apparition of Lady Dorothy Walpole. This famous photo was taken in 1936.
The ghost of Raynham Hall has been sighted since at least 1835 and is believed to be an apparition of Lady Dorothy Walpole. This famous photo was taken in 1936.

The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall

There has been stories about a ghost at Raynham Hall circulating since the 1830’s. Raynham Hall is a country house in Norfolk, England and it’s is reputedly haunted by the ghost of Lady Dorothy Walpole, the sister of Robert Walpole who is generally regarded as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. A local legend believes she haunts the house after being held there against her will by her husband after being caught committing adultery; it’s true that she died there in 1726 from smallpox.

Called the Brown Lady because of the brown brocade dress she wears in the various sightings of her. The famous photo of this ghost descending the main hallway staircase was taken by Captain Hubert C. Provand and his assistant Indre Shira for Country Life magazine. Although the photographers were there to take photos of the country house for a magazine article, the infamous photo was taken precisely because they actually spotted the ghost before the picture was hastily taken.
The photo has received much criticism over the years with many claiming that the photo is a ‘double exposure’ but the photographers have always claimed that there was no trickery involved.

Retired Scotland Yard Inspector Arthur Springer took this picture in Tingewick, England in 1916. There was no dog in the frame when the photo was taken but a ghost dog can be seen.
Retired Scotland Yard Inspector Arthur Springer took this picture in Tingewick, England in 1916. There was no dog in the frame when the photo was taken but a ghost dog can be seen.

The Ghost Dog of Tingewick

Retired Scotland Yard Inspector Arthur Springer took this picture in Tingewick, Buckinghamshire, England in 1916 of a garden tea party featuring Mrs Kate Townsend, another lady and a maid. It is alleged that there was no dog in the photo and that they didn’t even own a dog – but a ghostly image of a headless dog does appear! This famous early ghost photograph does have its critics however, photographs from this time required a slow exposure and dogs do have a tendency to move around a lot so, supposing that they actually did own a dog then it’s possible that it’s a real flesh and blood that moved during the exposure.
Its worth bearing in mind though that the British Isles has many ancient legends of ghostly dogs and hell hounds, commonly referred to as ‘Black Dogs’ that foretell misfortune and death – many of those ancient myths actually mention a headless dog!

Taken in 1966 on the Tulip Staircase at the Queen's House, London. It appears to show a spectral figure holding onto the handrails. Nothing was noticed when the photo was taken.
Taken in 1966 on the Tulip Staircase at the Queen's House, London. It appears to show a spectral figure holding onto the handrails. Nothing was noticed when the photo was taken.

The Queen’s House Ghost

The Queen's House in Greenwich, London dates back to around the early 1600’s. King James I is said to have given the manor of Greenwich to his wife Anne in apology for having sworn at her in public, after she accidentally shot one of his favourite dogs while hunting in 1614, hence the name of the building.
The famous photo is yet another one taken by a Reverend and another one where nothing unusual was noticed at the time. The picture was taken by the retired Canadian Rev. R.W. Hardy whilst on holiday with his wife; he had decided to take a picture of the Tulip staircase within the Queen’s House, the photo was taken from the angle of standing at the stairs at the bottom and looking upwards, no one was on the stairs as his wife was keeping a watch to ensure that no-one wandered into frame and the stairs were out of bounds to the public anyway but non-the-less, the photograph managed to capture an image of a ghostly figure holding onto the banisters, some people also claim to be able to make out feint outlines of another couple of ghosts in the photograph too.
A ghostly presence remains in the Queen’s House, with sightings being reported even now.

The town hall of Wem in Shropshire, England burnt down in November 1995. This photo was taken of the blaze; the Victorian ghostly girl was only noticed after the images were processed.
The town hall of Wem in Shropshire, England burnt down in November 1995. This photo was taken of the blaze; the Victorian ghostly girl was only noticed after the images were processed.

The Wem Town Hall Ghost

In November 1995, a fire totally gutted the 90 year old building which was watched by many of the town’s residents. One of the onlookers, Tony O'Rahilly, took some black and white photos of the building as the blaze raged but when he had the prints developed; he was amazed to see an image of a girl standing in the doorway of the burning building. A girl who wasn’t spotted by anyone watching the fire, she was only seen in the developed photo, the police and the fire brigade confirmed that none was injued in the fire and anyway, the fire was too intence for anyone to have been standing where the ghostly child appeared in the picture.
The photograph has created conrovery, while locals claim that the spectral image is of a girl called Jane Churn who was accused of arson in Wem in the 1670’s, some photographic analysis professionals claim to have detected some trickery although they cannot agree on what the tampering might be. Some even claim that the ghost is just a trick of the light.
A few years after the famous photo was taken, another resident of Wem claimed to have solved the case when he discovered a photo of a child from the 1920’s who looks remarkably similar to the Wem Ghost although closer analysis does suggest slight differences.
Tony O'Rahilly still claims his photo is not a fake but genuine.

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    • WiccanSage profile image

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      3 years ago

      Wow, I've never heard of half of these so it was a really fun read. Some great cases outlined here, love this hub.

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