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Reading Palms - the Position of the Hand

Updated on March 26, 2012

Reading palms can be a complex art, taking a life time to master. Reading palms can also be easy and fun.

Reading palms is both of these things, because there is a lot of wisdom in a palm, but even a little bit of knowledge can get you started doing palm readings for fun and to help yourself and the people around you.

Let's start at the beginning - at the best position of a hand for reading the palm.

A False Start

When people first hear that you will be reading palms, they'll often thrust their hands vigorously at you in a way that is almost aggressive. Their wrists and hands will be tense and tight, and their fingers stretched out as absolutely straight as they can go, sometimes almost to the point of bending slightly backwards.

This is exactly the hand position that you do not want.

Why do they do this? Well, many of them, especially ones who have never had their palms read before, are consciously or unconsciously feeling a little bit uncomfortable or scared. They're moving outside of their comfort zones, into the great unknown of the metaphysical world; and even those people who may have had some other kind of psychic reading before may feel uncomfortable about having a palm reading.

Because they're a bit "spooked", many people approach a palm reading with tense hands; and this makes the job of the reader of palms more difficult.

The Wrong Position

So, why's that tense position the wrong position for reading palms?

There's two reasons.

First, and foremost, you want the person whose palms you are reading to be relaxed and enjoy herself. This is equally true for the person who wants a palm reading in regards to a serious topic, and to the one who wants her palm read "for entertainment purposes only."

The person who wants an entertainment palm reading will enjoy it much more if her body is relaxed; and the person who is facing something serious will be better able to hear the information you have to give her and benefit from it if she is not also fighting a fear of the reading of palms. For either person, if you can relax the body, the mind-body connection will help to relax the mind, making for a more enjoyable reading.

The other reason this is the wrong position for reading palms is more functional. In this position, many of the lines, mounds and other landmarks of the palm are distorted or even vanish from sight, making it difficult to accurately read a palm.

The Right Position

Just as that tense position of the hand we've been talking about can distort or mask the landmarks of the hand, the right position can make them pop clearly into view, ready and willing for you to read them.

So, what's that right position?

The best position for a hand in order to read the palm is for the hand to be in a natural, relaxed, slightly cupped position. The position of the palm in the picture above is one good example, but there's a range of what will work for different individuals, so you have to play with it as you go along.

Let's examine why that's the best position.

Look at your own palm for a minute.

First stretch it out flat, with the fingers tense and almost bent backwards. Watch the lines in your hand as you do so. Do you see how they change, get shorter or lighter, or, in certain cases, disappear altogether?

Now let your hand relax, palm cupped and fingers gently bent so you can still see into the palm. What happened to the lines of your palm as you did this? Did you see how they got darker, deeper or easier to read; and how some lines reappeared out of nowhere?

Don't stop there. Move your hand back and forth between tense and relaxed a few times so you can really get a feel for good hand position.

Positioning the Palm for Reading

Now you know both the wrong and the right hand position for reading the palm. You also know that, many times, people will present their palm in the wrong position.

How do you get it into the right one?

Some people will be able to relax the hand if you ask them to. Some respond to having their hands held or gently rubbed. Some relax if you talk to them a bit first. As for me, I have a number of jokes that I use to help folks relax their hands.

Be gentle with people's hands as you get them into the right position. Some conditions such as scar tissue or arthritis can create tightness or pain in a hand if you move it too vigorously. If you are moving another person's hand so you can read it, start slow and keep an eye on the person's face for signs of discomfort.

As long as you are not causing pain, the important thing is to get that hand relaxed. Once you do, you're ready to read their palms.

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