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Why These Biblical Proofs Of Satan's Death Would Challenge Our Understanding About God's Immortality

Updated on December 27, 2016
WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 14: The book 'Jefferson's 'Bible' - The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth' (R) is displayed at the bookstore of Thomas Jefferson Memorial October 14, 2004 in Washington, DC. Although the U.S. constitution prohibits an official
WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 14: The book 'Jefferson's 'Bible' - The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth' (R) is displayed at the bookstore of Thomas Jefferson Memorial October 14, 2004 in Washington, DC. Although the U.S. constitution prohibits an official | Source

The Biblical Passages That You Might Have Overlooked

Are angels (or malakhim) really immortal? The answer is an absolute NO. This may no longer be shocking for a number of people, but for the devout believers who tirelessly and unquestioningly believes that there are immortal beings, this could be an earth-shattering revelation. Regardless of certain biblical ironies and dichotomies about these heavenly beings, often called as the sons of God, we will examine the biblical passages that prove Satans’ (Samyaza) existence will finally come to an end, and how his total demise will redefine our notion about God’s existence.

The Scripture provides more than a few passages which speaks about the imminent punishment of Samyaza and his legion. And the penalty for this irredeemable crime is obliteration. But before delving deeper into these passages about Satan’s death, it might also be important to know the nature of the crime he committed and his reasons for doing so.

The Fall Of Samyaza

Samyaza, as portrayed in the Book of Enoch, is the leader of the Watchers, a band of angels who lusted for mortal women; they lost their place in the kingdom of the Most High, were banished and later became known as fallen angels.

As quoted in the Book of Enoch (Chapter 6:3-5), Samyaza said unto his fellow watchers: "I fear ye will not indeed agree to do this deed, and I alone shall have to pay the penalty of a great sin." And they all answered him and said: "Let us all swear an oath, and all bind ourselves by mutual imprecations not to abandon this plan but to do this thing." Then together they swore and bound themselves by mutual imprecations upon it.

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