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10 Common Basketball Rebounding Mistakes

Updated on April 21, 2009
Rebounding requires a strong mentality and there is NO room for timid players under the hoop.
Rebounding requires a strong mentality and there is NO room for timid players under the hoop.

1. NOT BEING AGGRESSIVE IN PURSUIT OF THE BALL

One of the worst mistakes that a player can make is to NOT be aggressive in pursuit of the rebound. If a player isn’t willing to be relentless and give 110% EVERY time a shot is made, he or she will not be very effective on the boards.

Rebounding requires a strong mentality and there is NO room for timid players under the hoop.

2. STAYING BOXED OUT

It’s not a mistake for players to find themselves boxed out by an opponent, but it is a mistake to STAY boxed out. When fighting for the rebound on either end of the court, players MUST fight for the inside position against their opponent.

On offense, players should continually MOVE to get the inside position and avoid staying boxed out.

On defense, every move that a player makes should be a countermove to that of his or her opponent.

3. NOT MAKING CONTACT WITH THE OPPONENT

When going for the basketball rebound on either end of the court, it’s important for players to make contact with the opponent that they are guarding. Once the ball is released from the shooter’s fingertips, players should find their man, make contact to slow or block their path to the ball, and then go for the rebound.

4. NOT KEEPING HANDS UP

It’s important for players to remember to keep their hands UP when boxing out and going for the rebound. By having their hands up and elbows out, players are able to block the passing lane of opponents and more effectively gain the inside position for the rebound.

Check out these basketball rebounding drills to learn more about timing and getting hands up.


5. NOT MAINTAINING A STRONG BASE

By having a solid foundation, with feet spread shoulder-width apart, players risk getting pushed out of position for the rebound and possibly, the loss of the ball. Players  should also be reminded to keep their knees bent, which not only helps to maintain a strong base, but also allows them to either pivot, dribble, or pass the ball once it is rebounded.

The rebound should always be grabbed with TWO hands.
The rebound should always be grabbed with TWO hands.

6. GRABBING THE REBOUND WITH ONE HAND

Grabbing the ball with one hand increases the chance that the ball will be stolen after the rebound. For maximum ball protection, the rebound should always be grabbed with TWO hands, using the finger pads and NOT the palms.

7. STOPPING BETWEEN JUMPS IN AN EFFORT TO JUMP HIGHER

In an attempt to jump higher, many players bend deep at the knees between jumps; but this is WRONG. Instead of pausing, players should imagine jumping on a tight trampoline, making sure that they land on their toes and go back into the air EXPLOSIVELY.

8. WATCHING THE FLIGHT OF THE BALL ON DEFENSE

When playing defense, players should remember to watch the opponent that they are assigned to guard when a shot is attempted, and NOT the flight of the ball.

The opposing offensive player will react to the flight pattern of the ball. By countering the offensive player’s movements, the defensive player is also reacting to the ball.

The player that jumps often will usually get the ball over the player that can jump higher.
The player that jumps often will usually get the ball over the player that can jump higher.

9. TRYING TO JUMP HIGH RATHER THAN JUMPING OFTEN

GREAT rebounders understand that size doesn’t matter. When it comes to rebounding, the player that jumps often will usually get the ball over the player that can jump higher.

Most rebounds aren’t made on the first attempt; it takes persistence and drive for players to be able to CONTINUOUSLY go after the ball.

In order to be able to withstand this hard pursuit, players must adopt a rigorous strength and conditioning regimen that develops strong leg muscles and endurance.

10. NOT PROTECTING THE BALL AFTER THE REBOUND

After working so hard to get the rebound, the last thing that any coach or player wants to see is an opponent steal the ball and make an easy, high percentage shot.

Protecting the ball is critical to your team’s basketball rebounding success. After the rebound, players should be reminded to chin the ball, bring it close to their bodies and keep their elbows pointed outward, with the ball above the waistline.

Knees should stay bent, allowing players to either dribble, pivot, or make an outlet pass.

53 Basketball Rebounding Drills

Visit www.breakthroughbasketball.com/pr/rebounding.html for more basketball rebounding tips, tricks, techniques and drills.

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    • profile image

      Sarah 7 years ago

      There is no room for timid players under the hoop! I like that!

    • Gamerelated profile image

      Gamerelated 4 years ago from California

      Rule ten is a good rule. It sucks to put in work to get a rebound just to have it stolen. I also liked that you took the time to write a Hub about rebounding. Most people don't really pay attention to rebounding, but I think rebounding is one of the most overlooked aspects of basketball.

    • profile image

      king of the bank 3 years ago

      You should make one for the bank shot which is alomst 80% more efficient than the basic jumper which even great shooters can barely manage 50%. I bank literally in rec games close to 30 banks not including layups, dunks, threes, fta. I get upset when I watch the show NBA and all the other crap. Fundamentals are horrible. Everyone relies to much on athleticism.

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