ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Best 14th Round Knockouts in Boxing History

Updated on September 14, 2014

Roberto Duran K.O. 14 Ray Lampkin (1975)

Roberto Duran defended the lightweight crown with a destructive knockout of Ray Lampkin
Roberto Duran defended the lightweight crown with a destructive knockout of Ray Lampkin | Source

Who is The Best?

Which is your favorite boxer of all time?

See results

Roberto Duran vs. Ray Lampkin

"Hands of Stone" was the lightweight world champion and Ray Lampkin was a top rated contender in the 135 pound weight division.

Lampkin opened round one by landing some stiff jabs and right hands as Duran pursued but landed nothing of consequence. In round 2 Lampkin pounded Duran to the ribs and also landed some solid right hands to win a competitive stanza. In the third and fourth rounds Duran began to find distance and land hard shots to the body and head. In the fifth round Duran wobbled his foe and in the sixth both boxers slugged and boxed on even terms. It was the last hurrah for Lampkin who lost the 7th and 8th rounds easily. Duran started teeing off with crisp combinations behind speedy pressure. Lampkin began to show swelling around his eyes by the ninth heat and although he was landing some hard shots it was no match for Duran's output. The tenth-12th rounds were all Duran as he continued to punish his retreating opponent with a heavy two fisted assault. The 13th was a slow round as Duran took it off and Lampkin was satisfied to hold. In the 14th round, Duran landed a humongous Left hook that knocked Lampkin out old where he laid for almost an hour.

Aaron Pryor K.O. 14 Alexis Arguello (1982)

Aaron Pryor defended his 140 pound championship with a thrilling 14th round knockout of the legendary Alexis Arguello.
Aaron Pryor defended his 140 pound championship with a thrilling 14th round knockout of the legendary Alexis Arguello. | Source

Aaron Pryor vs. Alexis Arguello 1

Aaron Pryor was the undefeated Jr. Welterweight champion and Alexis Arguello was the legendary lightweight moving up to challenge him.

Arguello started off well using his height, reach and powerful right hands to keep even for four rounds, Pryor showed a steel chin and non stop pressure the whole bout. The fifth and sixth rounds was when the fight started turning in Pryor's favor. Pryor landed a crunching hook to cut Arguello at the end of the sixth. Pryor landed hard body shots and quick one-two's to win the seventh and eighth rounds even though he took some hard shots himself. The ninth-12th rounds were all Pryor as he never tired and Arguello seemed to be slowing down considerably. The 13th saw The Hawk landing almost at will as Arguello looked hurt and tired. In the 14th round Arguello leaned against the ropes and Pryor jumped on him. Aaron Pryor landed 10+ punches on a defenseless Arguello who was out on his feet. The ref jumped in and stopped the massacre.

Ray Mancini Highlights

Ray Mancini K.O. 14 Deuk-Koo Kim (1982)

Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini defended his lightweight tile by stopping Duek-Koo Kim in the 14th round.
Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini defended his lightweight tile by stopping Duek-Koo Kim in the 14th round. | Source

Ray Mancini vs. Deuk-Koo Kim

Ray "Boom Bomm" Mancini was the lightweight champion and Deuk-Koo Kim was his number one ranked title challenger.

Mamcini had a clear edge the entire fight with speed and skills but Kim was as game as it gets. It was competitive the first six rounds but after that it was all Mancini. The body punching, accurate jabs, hooks and right crosses seem to keep Kim from mounting a serious offensive down the stretch. By the tenth round, Kim was much slower and Mancini seemed to be fighting as if he had a second wind landing lots of clean shots to the head of the challenger. The eleventh and twelfth rounds were slow rounds with both boxers holding and landing very little. Towards the end of the 13th heat Deuk-Koo Kim was staggered from a two punch combination. In the 14th round Ray Mancini landed an alarming amount of clean punches that put Kim down and out. Kim died as a result of head injuries suffered in the bout and his death is why championship rounds were changed from 15 to 12 rounds.


Mathew Saad Muhammad K.O. 14 Yaqui Lopez (1980)

Mathew Saad Muhammad knocked out Yaqui Lopez in the 14th round of The Fight of the Year for 1980.
Mathew Saad Muhammad knocked out Yaqui Lopez in the 14th round of The Fight of the Year for 1980. | Source

Mathew Saad Muhammad vs. Yaqui Lopez 2

Mathew Saad Muhammad was the reigning light heavyweight champion and Yaqui Lopez was his top ranked challenger. The bout was named as Fight of the Year for 1980.

Muhammad fought like a warrior but after six rounds he was losing and his face was looking bad. Meanwhile, Lopez looked ready to go as he landed shot after shot to the head of Muhammad. The sixth was a good round for Muhammad as he landed a few wild rights and avoided any big punches in return. The seventh was a slow round for both boxers and could have went either way. The eighth round (Round of the Year 1980) was brutal as both men teed off on each other with Muhammad taking a true beating. Somehow, in round 9 Mathew Saad Muhammad staged a remarkable comeback and won all the final rounds and in the 14th heat, Muhammad put Lopez down four times to end the contest.

Sugar Ray K.O. 14 "The Hitman" (1981)

Ray Leonard he to mount a comeback to score a dramatic 14th round K.O. in a battle of unbeaten champions.
Ray Leonard he to mount a comeback to score a dramatic 14th round K.O. in a battle of unbeaten champions. | Source

Ray Leonard vs. Tommy Hearns 1

Sugar Ray Leonard was the WBC welterweight champion and Tommy "The Hitman" Hearns was the undefeated WBA welterweight champion. The match was named as Fight of the Year for 1981.

Sugar Ray boxed as expected against Tommy Hearns who boxed also but from long range and he had dynamite power. After five fast paced chess rounds Hearns was winning at least four of them if not all. In the sixth, Sugar Ray who ironically was losing by boxing turned brawler and visibly hurt The Hitman with a booming left hook. After that Leonard landed big shots to the head of his foe in the seventh and almost got a stoppage as Hearns seemed to really be hurt. The 8th round was a toss up round as both men slowed and took the stanza off. The 9th-12th were all Hearns as he stayed away and used great footwork and long range jabs and rights to close one of Leonard's eyes. At the end of the 13th an on rushing Leonard floored Hearns with a right but he beat the count and survived. When the 14th started, Leonard landed a huge overhand right that put Hearns out on his feet. Sugar Ray landed a hook to the body and head to force a stoppage.

Birthplace of Bob Foster (Albuquerque, NM)

Bob Foster vs. Chris Finnegan (1972)

Bob Foster was the light heavyweight champion and Chris Finnegan was a top ranked 175 pound contender. The bout was named as Fight of the Year for 1972.

Foster won the first two rounds with his stick and his aggression but in the third the bout became interesting. Finnegan began landing lead right hands and body shots. The fourth, fifth and sixth heats were closely contested with Foster landing the harder shots but Finnegan landing more punches. The seventh was a good round for Foster as he let loose with several big hooks that stunned Chris Finnegan. In the eighth and ninth, Finnegan staged a minor comeback by trading evenly with Foster and even seemed to have outgunned Foster for a moment. The tenth was all Foster as he landed a huge straight right hand that floored the boxer from England. Finnegan survived the round and fought on even terms with the champion in the eleventh. Foster was badly hurt himself in the 12th round by a devastating right hand but he recovered and had Finnegan out on his feet in the 13th. In the 14th and final round of this bout, Foster landed a left hook followed by a right hand that left Finnegan down for the count.

Ali- Frazier 3 Highlights

The Greatest vs. Smokin' Joe (1975)

Muhammad Ali stopped Joe Frazier after 14 brutal rounds of action in their third and final encounter.
Muhammad Ali stopped Joe Frazier after 14 brutal rounds of action in their third and final encounter. | Source

Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier 3

Muhammad Ali was the heavyweight champion and Smokin' Joe Frazier was the top contender for the title. This was the third and final battle between the two warriors.

Ali started fast by scoring with lead rights, clean jabs and footwork while Frazier seemed a step slower. After five rounds Ali was ahead but the body punching and vicious left hooks from Frazier were taking their tole. Frazier worked his way back in the bout and after 9 heats it was anybody's match. But it was to be Frazier's last hurrah as he received two swollen shut eyes, a bloody nose and mouth and a contorted face in rounds 10-13. Smokin' Joe never stopped swinging and definitely landed his share of shots until the end. In the 14th stanza it was obvious that Frazier couldn't see well and Ali tore into his adversary with deadly combinations. In between rounds, trainer Eddie Futch stopped the bout fearing for Frazier's health.

Tony Zale K.O. 14 Steve Mamakos (1941)

Tony Zale strikes a fighting pose prior to defending his 160 pound championship.
Tony Zale strikes a fighting pose prior to defending his 160 pound championship. | Source

Tony Zale's Biggest Wins

Rocky Graziano
Ben Brown
Fred Apostoli
Al Hostak
Georgie Abrams
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Five of "The Man of Steel"s top victories.

Tony Zale vs. Steve Mamakos

"The Man of Steel" Tony Zale was the world middleweight champion and Steve Mamakos was a top ranked 160 pound contender.

Zale lost the first two rounds as he was constantly beat to the punch. Mamakos landed hard jabs and several big hooks to win the heats. The third and fourth were close rounds with both guys landing plenty of leather. Mamakos landed a thudding right hand in the fifth which dropped Zale to the canvas hard. He got up instantly but barely survived the round. The sixth, seventh and eighth rounds were competitive with Zale throwing everything he had and Mamakos taking and coming right back with his own shots to the head and body. The tenth and eleventh were all Mamakos as he landed stiff jabs and accurate rights over and over. In the 12th both boxers slowed down and the round was a close one for Tony Zale who landed the harder punches on the inside. Zale was down on the cards when he unloaded a three punch combination that put Mamakos on the deck. He was saved by the bell and when the 14th began Mamakos was still badly hurt. Zale pounced on his rival with two big rights to end the contest without a count.

Amazing One Punch Knockouts

© 2014 Buster Johnson

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Sandra Eastman profile image

      Sandra Joy Eastman 2 years ago from Robbinsdale MN

      As always your hubs are thorough and interesting. Wondering on the average how many of these men had permanent disabilities because if their careers as Ali appears to have had.

    Click to Rate This Article