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Best Boxers of the 1960s

Updated on August 28, 2016

Hall of Fame Prizefighters

Carlos Ortiz was a great Lightweight champion from Puerto Rico.
Carlos Ortiz was a great Lightweight champion from Puerto Rico. | Source
Muhammad Ali easily beat Sonny Liston to win the heavyweight championship in 1964.
Muhammad Ali easily beat Sonny Liston to win the heavyweight championship in 1964. | Source
Eder Jofre, from Brazil, was a great technical boxer with outstanding defensive skills.
Eder Jofre, from Brazil, was a great technical boxer with outstanding defensive skills. | Source

Who is The Best?

Who is the best boxer from the 1960s?

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Rock-A-Bye Ruben

Ruben Olivares had a record in the 1960s of 54-0-1.
Ruben Olivares had a record in the 1960s of 54-0-1. | Source

Top 10 Boxers From The 60s

1. Muhammad Ali: Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay) won a gold medal in the 1960 Olympics and won the heavyweight title three times. Ali beat Sonny Liston for the championship and knocked him out in the rematch to defend his championship. Ali defended his championship nine times and never lost it in the ring. It was stripped of him because he refused induction into the Military to go to the Vietnam war. Ali had speed, reflexes, great jab and strait right hand.His calling card though was his amazing footwork. His heart and chin were excellent and he took on everyone. His best wins were against Liston (Twice), Floyd Patterson (Twice), George Chuvalo, George Foreman, Joe Frazier (Twice), and Kenny Norton (Twice). His final ring record was 56-5 with 37 knockouts.

2. Eder Jofre: Golden Bantam was an excellent boxer-puncher with perfect timing and a solid defense. Jofre could box you from side to side and in and out with jabs and accurate counters or he could slug it out on the inside while slipping shots in return. Also, He had a steel chin as evidenced by homing never being stopped in over 70 pro bouts. He held the Bantamweight championship from 1960-1965 making 8 total defenses. Jofre won the Featherweight crown and defended it once before he left the game. Eder Jofre's best victories have came against Eloy Sanchez, Piero Rollo, Sadao Yaoita, Johnny Caldwell and Katsutoshi Aoki. His final ring resume reads an amazing 72-2-4 with 50 knockouts to his credit.

3. Emile Griffith: Griffith could box with smooth skills on offense and defense or he could bang to the head and body on the inside. Although not a knockout puncher, Griffith had enough pop and accuracy to keep opponents at bay. He fought all the best boxers during his long and distinguished career. Emile Griffith won the welterweight championship three times, the Jr. Middleweight Title once, and Two reigns as the Middleweight champion. Griffith's top victories have came against: Luis Rodriguez, Dick Tiger, Niño Benvenuti, Bennie Brisco, Benny Paret, and Ralph Dupas. Griffith has a career resume reading 85-24-2 with 23 knockouts.

4. Carlos Ortiz: Puerto Rican great Ortiz was not a knockout artist but rather a boxing artist if you will. Fantastic jab, footwork and defensive abilities to go along with excellent conditioning and a good beard made Ortiz hard to beat. Ortiz won the Lightweight championship twice and the Jr. Welterweight championship once during his fabulous career. Carlos Ortiz has had many great accomplishments including wins over: Ismael Laguna, Flash Elorde, Sugar Ramos, Kenny Lane, Joe Brown, and Battling Torres. Ortiz retired with a mark of 61-7-1 with 30 knockouts.

5. Niño Benvenuti: Nino was not great at any one thing but he was good at it all. He had solid boxing skills complimented by steady aggression and good combination punching. Benvenuti is a former Jr. Middleweight and two time Middleweight champion of the world. His best victories came from beating Emile Griffith (Twice), Don Fullmer (Twice), Sandro Mazzinghi (Twice), Luis Folledo, and Jupp Elze. Nino Benvenuti is one of Italy's best ever prizefighters and his final ring record reads: 82-7-1 with 35 knockouts.

6. Ruben Olivares: Rockabye Ruben was a deadly puncher with both fists and he went to the body like nobody's business. He had a so-so chin and slow footwork but he put on steady pressure and his offense was brilliant. Olivares is a two time Bantamweight and two time Featherweight world champion who fought with fierce aggression win or lose. His best wins came from beating Lionel Rose (Bantamweight Champion), Bobby Chacon (Twice), Chucho Castillo (Twice), Jose Luis Ramirez and Zensuke Utagawa. Olivares left the sport with a record of 89-13-3 with 79 bone crushing knockouts wins.

7. Dick Tiger: Nigeria's Dick Tiger could box from a distance and bounce side to side with snappy jabs and strait rights or bull his way inside and rip hooks to the head and body. Although Tiger was not a one punch knockout artist his combination punching and counter punching accuracy did indeed score him several good stoppages. Tiger won the middleweight championship twice and he also won the world light heavyweight championship by defeating champion Jose Torres. Tiger's best wins came from beating: Nino Benvenuti, Jose Torres, Joey Giardello, Rubin Carter, Gene Fullmer and Don Fullmer. Tiger retired with a record of 60-19-3 with 27 knockouts.

8. Fighting Harada: Harada was a good boxer with excellent lateral movement and a hard, accurate jab which is the way he won his bouts. Harada had a tight defense and he is a former Flyweight and World Bantamweight Champion of the World. Hatada is one of the best boxers to ever come from Japan. His top wins came from beating the likes of: Pone Kingpetch (Flyweight Champion), Eder Jofre Twice (Bantamweight Champion), Bernardo Caraballo, and Joe Medel. Fighting Harada retired with a mark of 56-7 with 22 knockouts.

9. Flash Elorde: Flash is one of the best Filipino boxers in history and he is the longest reigning Jr. Lightweight champion in history, holding the title for over seven years. Elorde had fast hands and feet and solid overall offensive skills even though he was not a hard puncher. He knocked out Harold Gomes to start his title reign and he made nine successful defenses along with several non title wins. Elorde's biggest achievements were beating: Gomes (Twice), Sergio caprari, Auburn Copeland, Johnny Bizzarro, Teruo Kosaka, and Ismael Laguna. Flash Elorde retired with a resume reading: 89-27-2 with 33 knockouts.

10. Vicente Saldivar: Saldivar was a brawler but he still set things up with the jab and he was consistent with his body attack which helped him score several late round stoppage wins. He is widely considered one of Mexico's greatest ever world champions and one of the best Featherweight champions in history as well. Saldivar is a two time Featherweight World champion. Saldivar beat many solid champions and top contenders such as Johnny Famechon, Jose Legra, Howard Winstone, Sugar Ramos, Raul Rojas and Ismael Laguna. Saldivar left the sport with a record of: 37-3 with 26 knockouts.




Eder Jofre's Biggest Victories

Eloy Sanchez
Johnny Caldwell
Fighting Harada
Jose Medel
Bernado caraballo
Katsutoshi Aoki
 
 
 
 
 
 
Six opponents who learned the hard way what being taught a boxing lesson really means.

Italian Middleweight Legend

Niño Benvenuti retired from boxing with a mark of  82-7-1 with 35 knockouts to his credit.
Niño Benvenuti retired from boxing with a mark of 82-7-1 with 35 knockouts to his credit. | Source

Tiger Man Handles The Hurricane

Dick Tiger beat Ruben Carter by a one sided ten round decision in a middleweight contest.
Dick Tiger beat Ruben Carter by a one sided ten round decision in a middleweight contest. | Source

New EverLast Punch Mitts

Great Boxing Bouts of The 60's

Floyd Patterson K.O. 6 Ingemar Johansson (1961) Patterson went down twice in the first and Ingo was also dropped hard in the first. In the sixth Patterson put Johansson down and out.

Carlos Ortiz K.O. 14 Flash Elorde (1966) Ortiz fought a pitch battle with Elorde with both boxers taking the lead during the early and middle rounds. In the 13th round Ortiz rocked Elorde and in the 14th he rendered the scorecards useless.

Niño Benvenuti K.O. 11 Luis Rodriguez (1969) Fighting in his home country of Italy, Nino put on a show of will and heart as he was shaken several times and down on the scorecards when in the eleventh round Benvenuti landed a thudding left hook and boom the bout was over.

Floyd Patterson K.O. 5 Ingemar Johannson (1960) Patterson was wobbled several times before rallying to floor Johansson twice in the fifth round, the second time for the count. Patterson became the first man in history to regain the heavyweight championship.

Gene Fullmer W15 Sugar Ray Robinson (1961) It was a close, back and forth encounter but Fullmer upset the odds and beat Sugar Ray by decision in one heck of a prizefight. The rounds were close as both men landed blistering hooks and body shots throughout. Fullmer won the Middleweight championship of the world.

Emile Griffith Fight Clips

Eder Jofre Fight Clips

How Many Reigns?


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Birthplace of Eder Jofre (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Muhammad Ali Career Highlights

© 2013 Buster Johnson

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