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Kentucky Bass, Largemouth Keep Ohio River Fishing Edgy

Updated on October 9, 2012
Nothing quite like the fight of a nice-size largemouth bass to let you know just how alive the Ohio River waterway is
Nothing quite like the fight of a nice-size largemouth bass to let you know just how alive the Ohio River waterway is
Like its largemouth and smallmouth cousins, the spotted or Kentucky bass is a berserkerwhen it comes to attacking baits. While the differences may seem minute between the appearances of the fish, they are real.
Like its largemouth and smallmouth cousins, the spotted or Kentucky bass is a berserkerwhen it comes to attacking baits. While the differences may seem minute between the appearances of the fish, they are real.
This smaller Kentucky bass was pulled out of the same rocky bank where smallmouths are common.
This smaller Kentucky bass was pulled out of the same rocky bank where smallmouths are common.

Kentucky Bass Smaller But No Less Aggressive

by Robb Hoff

October 5, 2012

The Ohio River may still teem with hybrid striped bass, but catching even smaller ones has become more of a chore as the Fall weather starts to creep into the river valley.

Fortunately, the other type of bass -- the real, native bass of the largemouth, smallmouth and spotted or Kentucky varieties -- continue to make their presence known with powerful hits and spirited fights.

After catching a pair of Kentucky bass and pointing out to my son the differences between these types of bass and their largemouth cousin, which they most closely resemble, I caught a 14-inch largemouth that my son could take a close look at to note the primary differences.

Some specimens of the Kentucky bass are more pronounced than others as far as their differences between the largemouth. Most notable are the display of black dots below the lateral line, the location of the jaw line even with the eye and the patch of teeth (often a raspberry color) on the tongue.

For all practical purposes, the differences aren't all that obvious or important, other than the fact that the Kentucky bass doesn't grow as big. For a detailed newspaper reference about the Kentucky bass and its history, please refer to the link below.

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