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Top 5 Worst Draft Picks- Jacksonville Jaguars

Updated on April 29, 2015

These guys were brought in to help the team win, but couldn't accomplish anything on the field. Today I rank the top five worst draft picks by the Jacksonville Jaguars.

I know what you're thinking. The Jags have drafted a lot of busts at wide receiver. So many I could almost make a list of just worst wide receiver draft picks by the Jags.

5. Matt Jones

He was a college quarterback who tried to make a position change and failed.

In his four years at Arkansas, Matt Jones was known for his outstanding speed and his ability to escape tackle attempts, providing numerous highlights for the Razorbacks. When he left school he was the SEC's all time leader in rushing yards by a quarterback.

Jones was selected 21st overall in 2005. He had potential as a wide receiver, but his career was plagued by arrests and drug addiction. The team could have drafted standout tight end Heath Miller over him. When it came down to it, he was nothing more than a fast ex quarterback with bad hands. He lasted four seasons in Jacksonville before being released in 2008 due to his drug related arrests.

4. Justin Blackmon

He was another disappointment at wide receiver for the Jaguars.

In his four years at Oklahoma State, Justin Blackmon was as productive as any wide receiver in college football history. In 2010, he was named the BIG 12 Offensive Player of the Year. He finished his college career as a two time All-American and two time Biletnikoff award winner as the nations top wide receiver.

Blackmon was selected fifth overall in 2012. While he had impressive 273 yard receiving performance against Houston as a rookie, things soon went downhill. In the past two years he has been suspended twice and arrested multiple times for substance abuse. His dependence on marijuana has cost him his career with the team and likely a career with any other team.

3. Derrick Harvey

The team traded up to get him and paid the price.

In his three years at Florida, Derrick Harvey dominated the defensive line. He finished his college career with 20.5 sacks, 51.5 tackles for loss, and two forced fumbles. He was the MVP of the 2007 National Championship game and two time All-SEC team member.

Harvey was selected eighth overall in 2008. After holding out for a team record 38 days, He was a major failure as a pass rusher and run stopper and was only a part-time starter. In three years in Jacksonville, he only recorded eight sacks. He was released by the team in 2011, and has failed to make another team's roster. The Jaguars were way off in declaring he was a better version of All-Pro Terrell Suggs.

2. Reggie Williams

He was seen as a can't miss prospect at wide receiver.

At Washington. Reggie Williams was a stud possessing prototypical size, above average speed, and exceptional leaping ability.

Williams was the ninth overall pick in 2004 by Jacksonville. In 2006, he was charged with possession of marijuana. 2009 was the same story, but also included a DWI and possession of cocaine. These downfall inducing addictions, combined with on-field inconsistency, ushered out another Jacksonville bust. His best season, the only one that he missed a game, came in 2007 when he set career highs in yards and touchdowns. Aside from that minor achievement, Williams found himself broke and jobless by the age of 26 in the primmest of years.

1. R. Jay Soward

He let his personal issues affect his promising career.

As a freshman at USC, R. Jay Soward burst onto the college football scene with a four touchdown game vs. UCLA. Despite his superior skills, he never reached his potential in his USC career, ending his tenure with 32 touchdowns in four seasons.

Soward was drafted 29th overall in 2000 by Jacksonville. The Jaguars saw his pure talent as too much to ignore and had to take a risk on him. Soward had a history of off field controversies and substance abuse problems. At USC, he admitted to smoking marijuana everyday. He lasted only a year in the NFL before more off field issues forced him to play in the CFL, recording a measly 14 receptions for 108 yards with no touchdowns. His demise stemmed from the personal problems in his life. Seriously, even head coach Tom Coughlin, paid for a limo to pick him up from practice in case he didn't show.

People's Poll

Which Jaguar was the worst draft pick?

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Comments

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    • profile image

      Kevin Goodwin 

      3 years ago

      Blackmon could have been good but he could not stay out of trouble.

    • Ty Tayzlor profile imageAUTHOR

      TT 

      3 years ago from Anywhere

      Jones just had to many issues outside of football.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 

      3 years ago from Oklahoma

      Matt Jones was an NFL combine Dynamo. If only it had translated to actual success on the field.

    • Ty Tayzlor profile imageAUTHOR

      TT 

      3 years ago from Anywhere

      I could have also included guys like James Stewart, Byron Leftwich, or Reggie Nelson. Face it, Jacksonville rarely strikes gold in the draft.

    • Chris Austin profile image

      Chris Austin 

      3 years ago from St. Augustine, Florida

      I agree with all 5 -- the order I would change on some the article is on point. I feel Matt Jones, as a project player, though should be the #1 for this list

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