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Top 5 Worst Draft Picks- Minnesota Vikings

Updated on May 4, 2015

These guys were brought in to help the team win, but couldn't accomplish anything on the field. Today I rank the top five worst draft picks by the Minnesota Vikings

5. Christian Ponder

He was brought in to give the Vikings an added dimension, but failed to show progress year after year.

At Florida State, Christian Ponder was a steady field manager quarterback. He didn't get more pro Scouting until the Senior Bowl where he was named the game's MVP.

Ponder was selected 12th overall in 2011. He started off fairly well as a rookie, but seemed to regress each season and failed. To show toughness when he missed the Vikings 2012 playoff game because of a deep bicep bruise. The following year, he lost his starting job to Matt Cassel and has since been released and signed by Oakland.

4. D.J. Dozier

He was a two sport athlete that wasn't successful at either one at the pro level.

D.J. Dozier led Penn State in rushing all four seasons of his college career and scored the winning touchdown in their Fiesta Bowl victory over Miami that gave them the 1986 National Championship.

Dozier was the 14th overall pick in 1987 by Minnesota. The Vikings’ running game had been struggling with Darrin Nelson who had gained 793 yards in 16 games during 1986. The running game production fell even farther with Dozier on the team. Five of his seven career touchdowns came in his rookie season. In his five seasons in the NFL, the last one with the Lions, he gained a total of 691 yards. He was splitting the final two seasons of his football career with playing minor league baseball in the New York Mets’ system and in 1992 he began playing baseball full time.

3. Gerald Robinson

He was brought in to rebuild the defense, but did nothing but disappoint.

While at Auburn, Gerald Robinson built a reputation as one of the greatest pass rushers in school history. He left school as the Tiger's all time sack leader.

Robinson was selected 14th overall in 1986. The Vikings had hoped he would help rebuild the team's once great defense. Instead, he drastically underperformed. In two seasons, Robinson produced only 44 tackles and 3.5 sacks in 16 games. He went on to play six more years with the Rams and Chargers.

2. Dimitrius Underwood

He looked the part, but couldn't play the part.

At Michigan State, Dimitrius Underwood had monster size at defensive end. As a junior starter, he registered 57 tackles and 8 sacks.

Underwood was selected 29th overall in 1999. The day after he signed his five-year, $5.3 million contract, he left training camp and never returned. Underwood claimed he could not resolve the conflict between playing football and serving his faith. He was released by Minnesota a month later and bounced around the NFL and CFL until calling it a career in 2005.

1. Troy Williamson

His speed couldn't overcome his poor hands.

Unlike some of the other busts on this list, Troy Williamson didn't have much success at the college level.

Williamson was the seventh overall pick in 2005 by Minnesota. What the Vikings forgot to incorporate in their evaluation was a little attribute we like to call "catching" or "hands." Williamson did not possess either ability and it was blatantly obvious. He led the NFL in drops his rookie season, claiming his depth perception and therefore hand-eye coordination was poor due to vision problems. Un three mediocre seasons in Minnesota, he caught solely 85 passes for 1,131 yards, and four touchdowns.

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Comments

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    • profile image

      Kevin Goodwin 

      3 years ago

      Williamson couldn't catch a ball to save his life.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 

      3 years ago from Oklahoma

      I don't know if I would have put Ponder on this list.

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