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Top 5 Cheap Fixed Gear Wheelsets: 2017 Reviews & Tips

Updated on December 30, 2016

Looking for the Best Inexpensive Fixed Gear Wheelsets?

Fixed gear bikes are fun to ride and even more fun to build, and they're getting more popular all the time. If you want to build a fixie of your own (or upgrade one you already have), you'll need a good fixed gear wheelset to get started. This involves a specialized cog that is fixed in place (no pedalling backwards!), which requires a unique hub and lockring. The first bicycles ever built were all fixed gears, and they are coming back into fashion because they are tons of fun to ride.

It's getting easier to find pretty good wheels these days, though it can be confusing because they range greatly in price from very inexpensive to high end. If you're looking for a good, cheap fixed gear wheelset, it's important to find one with quality construction and great components that will last.

This lens is intended for someone relatively new to fixed gears. I aim to narrow your search by suggesting a few fantastic options to consider. All of the wheelsets listed here will cost you less than $200, and each one includes quality components, solid construction and great reviews. Hopefully this list will help make your choice a little easier.

With each set of fixie wheels, we'll be looking at the quality of the components involved (including the rims, hubs, cog and lockrings) and the materials used (for example, carbon fibre, aluminum, steel), the experience other buyers have had, and the overall price as compared to the components.

We'll also try to cover a few different 'looks', since your taste is unique. We'll look at a few standard look wheelsets, a few 'deep V' wheels, and some colored options too!.

If you have any questions or comments, please leave a message. Now, let's look at the top 5 best cheap fixed gear wheels out there!

Vuelta Zerolite Comp: Good quality, budget priced fixed gear wheels

For more of a traditional look, these Vuelta Zerolites offer a cheap fixed gear wheelset with a really great look to them. With a standard depth for 700c wheels, these will look great on almost any bike. The decals on the rims can easily be removed if you want a more 'unbranded' look, or you can keep them on and they look great that way too!

Talk about bang for your buck! The Vuelta Zerolite fixie wheel set is inexpensive and really nicely put together. CNC machined sidewalls are perfect for brake setups, and the sealed cartridge bearing hubs spin freely. Speaking of the hubs, the rear is a flip-flop, meaning you have the option of a freewheel side, though it only comes with a fixed cog and lockring.

All of this is great, but when you consider the low price tag it's a total steal, since in most shops they cost twice what you see here! A great starting point for any fixed gear bike build.

Note: I've been asked many times which of the many wheelsets I've listed here is the best. I think they're all great, but if you're starting fresh and want clear direction, I recommend the Vuelta Zerolite set as a great starter. They're an inexpensive fixie wheel set that's durable, light, and looks great on any frame.

State Bicycle: An affordable deep-V fixed gear wheelset with good looks

State Bicycle fixed gear wheelsets are available in lots of color options, and their components are top notch, with a huge customer following. One of my favorites for when I build a custom fixie.

These fixed gear wheelsets are neat because they are very 'deep v'. Typically deep v wheels for a fixie will be quite expensive, but they've managed to keep these sets very reasonable with smart and flexible choices in components. Not only do they come in many colors, they are unbranded, so you can keep your bike looking clean and custom. They're put together very well, and they spin true and easily.

Another bonus: these wheels come with a flip-flop hub built in. This means you have two options for riding style: one side is standard fixed gear with cog and lock ring. The other side is threaded to hold a freewheel. If you want to be able to coast easily again, just flip your wheel around and presto, you'll be flying down the hills in style. (These wheelsets don't actually include the freewheel cog and lockring, you'll have to buy those separately).

As they grow in size and popularity, State Bicycle Co. fixie wheels are getting a bigger following, and the prices are simply great. Check them out!

Origin 8 Track Attack: A stealthy, budget fixie wheelset

Origin 8 is a relative newcomer to the fixed gear scene, but they're already putting out a ton of quality, fixie inspired components, including tons of colored stuff which is very popular. Their Track Attack brand represents a cheaper fixed gear wheelset that is aimed at inexpensive track builds. With deep v wheels and tons of options, they are really worth considering.

Origin 8 wheels include Origin 8 brand hubs, which are high quality and have sealed bearings. The sidewalls on most of these are not machined, so keep that in mind if you're going for a setup with brakes.

Given their low prices and options for color (both the rims and the hubs themselves) Origin 8 Track Attack wheelsets are really nice for a totally custom setup. You can plan a ride that really stands out by including these beautiful wheels.

EighthInch Julian: Among the best fixed gear wheelsets for brakeless

Eighth Inch Julian fixie wheels are popular, highly deep-V wheelsets for the non-brake crowd, and they are a fantastic choice if you're going that route (brakeless or track). They are a fantastically strong wheel and they also happen to look really great at the same time. The color choices are limited, but they come in a mostly neutral palette that matches almost any ride.

They do not have a machined sidewall surface, so they aren't set up for traditional brakes. They come with Formula sealed hubs (exceptional, for the price) and they are flip-flop. The rims themselves are triple walled, meaning they are tough as nails and very strong. They're quite light, and the few stickers the wheels come with are removable if you want to be 'badge-less'.

Overall this is an unbelievable price, at any shop a custom wheelset with these components would run you at least double, so give this cheap fixed gear wheel set a look.

Weinmann: A good track and fixed gear wheelset

In the track and fixed gear bicycle world, Weinmann is a big player. Their products are well known for being really high quality, and they have many expensive pro-level gear you can buy. I was shocked to find Weinmann fixed gear wheelsets this cheap. Their component quality usually indicates a much higher price level.

In a set of Weinmann wheels, you'll get a straightforward, back to the basics type set of wheels. They may be a cheap fixed gear wheelset, but they are well built all the way, with Formula sealed bearing hubs front and rear, Weinmann rims and 32 spokes for maximum strength and integrity. They have a machined surface that's set up to work well with front and rear brakes. They typically arrive true and ready to roll right out of the box.

Like the State Bicycle Co. wheels reviewed above, these Weinmann single speed wheelsets are cheap and available in a variety of color choices and rim types, including deep v. If you're on a budget but still hoping for quality, definitely check these ones out.

Building Fixies on the Cheap? How much to spend and why

Building a custom, cheap fixed gear bicycle is getting easier, and parts are more readily available today than ever before. It is super satisfying building something from scratch, and I've built quite a few myself. Hopefully this article helps you track down a good, inexpensive fixed gear wheelset that works for whatever you're building.

Whether you opt for a good, inexpensive deep V wheelset or want something more clean and classic, I hope you place the brand and the build quality above looks. Wheels carry all your weight at high speed and they need to be built right.

I love to help people out, so if you have any questions about any of the wheel sets here, or just plain fixie building in general, please leave a comment!

More Recommendations

Be sure to pay attention to customer reviews when considering a brand you're unfamiliar with. Take your time and be sure that you're investing in a good set for your ride.

Questions or comments regarding fixed gear wheelsets?

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    • CoolFool83 profile image

      CoolFool83 4 years ago

      These can help save people a lot of money.

    • cargoliftken profile image

      cargoliftken 4 years ago

      Nice lens. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      imxta2 4 years ago

      I love this post thank you!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi there,

      thanks a lot for your post! As I am living in the Netherlands and face some difficulties or extra expenses ordering from the USA, have you heard about the Gipiemme Pista R40? Are they worth the money? I read something about problems with their bearings etc. but also good stuff, and the style fits perfectly to my Classic Peugeot!

      I am thinking of the silver unmachined version

      Many thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I ment gipiemme pista A40

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yeah, from what I read about the Gipiemme Pista wheelset their non sealed bearings are horrible, I would avoid. I strongly recommend a wheelset with a sealed bearing set, it's much better. Sorry, most of my reviews are North American based! Have you checked out Planet X? They ship to the EU and have a good set of Weinmann wheels available.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      So which is the best of the five, i like eightinch and vuelta.

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: They're all solid. I'd base your choice on the look you're going for. Vuelta is a great starting point. :)

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Jesse, yeah it's tough, deep V is really popular. Try Ebay, search for the Mavic CXP22 track or H Plus Son track wheelsets. Alex ACE-19 is semi-deep v but probably fits the look and it's inexpensive. Hope that helps!

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Hi, thanks for the info! If I go from a 27in to a 700c will I not be able to have brakes at all ? or could I just get a long reach one for the front wheel?

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      good stuff! do you have a list like this for cranksets ?

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Is this for an older road bike? 27 inch is slightly bigger in diameter than 700c. So if you're switching to 700c, go for brakes that have around 4mm more reach. Your brakes may have 4mm of room to play with already, some older road bikes have adjustable pads.

    • BikePro profile image
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      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Actually yes, I wrote one on affordable cranksets not too long ago! https://hubpages.com/sports/the-best-single-speed-...

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      @BikePro: Yeah it's an old road bike that I'm converting to a fixie. I went with the vuelta wheel set. Thanks !

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      i'am planning to buy some B43 velocity wheels, but i don't know if i can get brakes on them (in the way of the paint coming of or something )

      if know please reply fast!!!

      thx

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Out of all the wheelsets mentioned above which set would you ultimately recommend and or purchase

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      I'm not very familiar with wheels, and I have a low budget and live in the Netherlands. Would you recommend me these: www.bikester.nl/fietsonderdelen/fietswielen-naven/velgen-fiets/5135.html ?

      I plan on putting them on my peugeot frame converted from the '80's.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      @anonymous: b43s are really heavy

      if your going to put brakes on your bike make sure you get machined wall rims or else the paint will strip and look ugly

      if your intending on spending around 300$ go for mavic ellipses

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Hey thanks for the great info...good of you post this stuff.

      I am getting ready to convert my Schwinn Tempo 10 speed into a fixie. It has horizontal drop outs so it should be pretty straight forward. I think I'm about ready but still not clear about a couple things;

      Size of the chain.

      Will I be able to use my original chain ring? Can I get a rear cog that takes the same chain size? If so may I use either the small or the large chain ring and get a straight chain line?

      Also, I have seen a non toothed rim that is made to replace the large chain ring in one of the You Tube clips. This part allows you to have a chain guard in front and use the original chain ring bolts. (really not sure about this one??)

      Thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      what are some fixie wheel sets that are under 40 bucks if there are any, but still look cool on an all black 1973 nishiki roadbike frame

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Under 40 for a set? You won't find any, unless you're looking on Craigslist for a used set, and even that will be tough to find. The ones listed above are about as cheap as you should safely go.

    • BikePro profile image
      Author

      BikePro 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Bob, a 1/8" chain like your 10 speed uses should work fine with a fixed gear cog (usually 3/32"). You can't go the other way though (single speed chain won't work on a derailleur bike). And yes you can probably get your existing chainring to work, just make sure that the chain is reasonably straight as you say.

      The bit about the guard is very tricky, I'd avoid. Chainring bolt spacing varies from bike to bike, could be an exercise in frustration! Hope that helps.

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