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Which Is The Best Adult Tricycle Bike?

Updated on September 9, 2018

Three of the best adult trikes.

Cycling is fantastic. It's a great exercise and so much fun to get out on the road, and it's a great way to commute to and from work without spending a penny on gas.

But unfortunately a bicycle isn't an option for everyone. If you suffer from balance issues, injury or disability, a bike may not work. A good quality adult tricycle bike is an alternative for anyone missing the road.

Adult three-wheeled bicycles are great for a lot of reasons. Like conventional bikes, they are fun, fast and a great source of exercise. Trikes even have some significant advantages over conventional cycling.

This article will take a look at adult tricycle bikes and what makes them tick. We'll weigh the advantages and disadvantages and offer some tips on purchasing, riding and storing them. Then we'll review three great models I'd recommend checking out.

Let's get started!

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Why adult 3-wheeled bicycles are growing in popularity

The adult-sized tricycle is in demand today because there is a growing need for a middle ground in the cycling industry.

There are a lot of people who find a conventional bicycle is difficult or undesirable for a number of reasons, but still want to enjoy the many benefits of cycling.

Full-sized tricycles for adults aren't new. They have actually been around since basically the birth of the bicycle around 150 years ago. For some reason, however, they have been relegated to the background, and today they're commonly associated with children's toys, taxi service vehicles and utility cargo carts.

I suggest that we start to think differently, since in many ways trikes are a lot more practical than the two-wheeled variety!

Luckily, today is a great era for those interested in riding adult trikes. Popular bike brand names like Schwinn are coming out with some functional and attractive options, like storage carts.

1) Kent Bayside: A comfortable, versatile full-sized tricycle for adults.

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A proper three-wheeled bike with a generous basket

The Kent Bayside is a nice option for anyone who requires some versatility in gearing and a bit more comfort and support than what other models offer. It's a fully steel-framed adult tricycle bike with a seven-speed Shimano grip shifter, so if you do run into any hills you'll be prepared.

The trike is built with an adult rider in mind, and it's very comfortable and easy to get on and off. You'll notice the lumbar back support behind the seat, which is nice for when you need to lean back.

There's a front suspension fork for a softer ride, and a front fender for wet weather or gravel. Finally, it has a large integrated rear basket for groceries, bags or whatever you need to bring along.

This adult-sized tricycle gets great reviews (worth a read), and it's definitely one of the best three wheeled tricycles for adults available today. And it's pretty affordable considering the basket, the gearing options and all the free extras it comes with.

Schwinn Meridian: A large 3-wheeled adult bike that's fun to ride

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Full-sized wheels increase your top speed

The Schwinn Meridian is getting a lot of positive attention for its great looks, nice features and accessible price tag. The step through frame makes it easy to get on and off, and the aluminum construction makes it on the lighter side as adult tricycles go.

It's a single speed, so it's best suited towards flatter areas with few hills. It's awesome for the beach or the boardwalk.

This is one of my top choices because you would be hard pressed to find a more affordable option than this. It's a lot less expensive than many conventional bicycles, so it's wonderful for riders wanting a stable, stylish and cargo friendly ride without breaking their bank account.

The padded seat and riding position are really comfortable, and you have a few color choices to pick from. And it comes with a rare inclusion: 26-inch wheels, meaning a higher top-end speed and smoother ride.

Long and lean, it's got a dragster-like feel to it. If you're an adult looking for a three-wheeled bike or trike and don't want to sacrifice fun, give this one a look.

Mobo Triton Pro: A recumbent trike for a different riding position

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The Mobo Triton Pro is an affordable, unique recumbent tricycle for adults. Recumbent means that you sit in a reclined position with your feet in front of you while you cycle. It's a bit of a strange feeling at first, but ergonomically speaking it's probably the easiest and most comfortable position to do it from. It's a fantastic choice if you suffer from back or knee pain and feel more at ease in a reclined position.

With a single speed hub, a low center of gravity for great stability, direct steering and a high seat, this is comfy and easy to ride. You'll also get a ton of attention at the park or beach, and everyone will want to see how it works and find out where you got it.

The Triton Pro has an extendable frame, meaning it'll fit a wide range of riders. Pedaling is low impact and you steer using the two levers instead of a set of handlebars. It's fun!

One note, if you opt for a recumbent adult tricycle, I'd make sure to fit it with a flag if you're going to ride on the road, so vehicles can see you. The Triton Pro sits a bit lower to the ground than most upright trikes do, so buses and trucks might not see you very easily.

Why pick an adult trike over a regular bike?

Here are a few reasons why you might consider a three-wheeled bicycle over a standard bike.

  • Stability: tricycles are extremely stable in most situations. While they do take a bit of getting used to (they ride differently from a bike, no leaning involved), they are great for all weather and terrain situations that bikes normally face. For anyone with balance worries, an adult tricycle is worth taking a look.
  • Cargo Capacity: adult tricycle bikes can actually hold a decent amount of cargo compared with a regular bicycle. Many of them come with rear baskets that are quite large and stable. They are ideal grocery getters, and the ample storage capacity is a real advantage.
  • Comfort: Tricycles for adults can be quite a bit more comfortable than a traditional bike. The riding position is relaxed, and there's no tension involved with the effort to stay balanced. You can ride for a longer period without getting fatigued on one of these things.

Cons and potential detractors

There are a few ways that bicycles are more advantageous than tricycles. I'll list them here.

  • Weight: Tricycles are obviously much heavier than bicycles. That means that they can be a little harder to control, and you need to be sure your brakes are operating correctly. Re-aligning them or pulling them around can be a challenge.
  • Storage & Transportation: Storing your adult tricycle bike can be a pain, because they take up more room than a regular bike. They are still portable compared to a vehicle, but you should make sure you have somewhere to stash it. Likewise, transporting it in a car can be tough unless you opt for a folding variety.
  • Mechanically Complex: This is unlikely to be a major detractor, but the best tricycles for adults are usually more mechanically complex than a bicycle. That means they should have regular tune ups at a bike shop to make sure they're running correctly.

What do you think about these trikes? Would you ride one?

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    • profile image

      Patricia 

      16 months ago

      Hi. I am only 4'6" tall and weigh 280 . What size 3 wheel bike would be for me. And I have short arms. Thankyou

    • profile image

      Blair 

      2 years ago

      Hi, I am considering buying the Belize comfort Tri-Rider for my 70 year old grandmother, she intends to get electric fitted to the tricycle, would you recommend me buying this trike?

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      3 years ago

      Hi Brian,

      I'd opt for the Torker. I haven't seen either bike in person, but I'm a big Torker fan from the unicycle world. They seem very well built. I'd only avoid it if you're quite tall. The Town and Country is a great option too, and in my experience Schwinn's are pretty decent quality wise. Shipping damage would depend on the individual shipper.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      3 years ago

      Hi vla53, I'd definitely go for the 24, it should be the right size for you!

    • profile image

      Brian 

      3 years ago

      Great lens!

      I just bought a 2009 Schwinn Town and Country with a front tire friction mounted motor assist. My wife loves it and feels very comfortable on it. I am now looking for a trike for myself. I think the Miami Sun trikes are nice, single speed trikes but the seat is not tall enough. The Schwinn Meridian I have found tons of reviews about the overall quality (especially with shipping damage) and that being the main concern. Torker seems to be a great name behind the trike.

      My question is, for $600, do I get a brand new Schwinn Town and Country or do I go with the Torker Tristar? Both are 3 speed trikes, the Schwinn has 26" wheels all around the Torker is 24" front and 20" rear tires. I may eventually add a motor assist to either one, just looking for which trike is actually better.

      Thank you all for your time!

    • profile image

      vla53 

      4 years ago

      I am 5'4 What size adult tricycle should I buy ? 24 or 26. I can't find a bike store around where I live, that carry tricycles. So I can't try them out.

    • profile image

      IreneL11 

      5 years ago

      Great lens.

    • profile image

      acreativethinker 

      5 years ago

      These are nice looking bikes for shopping and leisure riding. Thanks for sharing.

      Take care :)

    • profile image

      jura 

      5 years ago

      Interesting ,gfet lens .

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Thank you for the info..are they available in Vancouver BC?

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I own 2 recumbent trikes- Terratrike Rambler and Catrike Villager. Very comfortable, stable and fun. I have a Burly Tail Wagon for my dog and also for hauling groceries, etc.

    • NatureFan LM profile image

      NatureFan LM 

      5 years ago

      The trikes are very cute, but I'm more of an extreme cycler. I see the point of them, however. Great lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Are there any Tricycles that have back wheels that can fold together?

      Do you know any Tricycles that fold small enough to bring on the bus with you?

      Would any of them be suitable to a 300lbs. person?

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: I know there are Terratrike dealers in Kitchener (Brauns), Guelph (Brauns) and London (First Cycle Works), but I'm not from that area so I can't confirm. As for a cross hand and foot pedalled bike, I've never really seen such a system. It would have to be custom built I'd think.

      Check out Recumbent Trikes Canada, based in Orillia, Ontario. They don't carry TerraTrike, but they have lots of alternatives. I'd give them a call.

      I have an incomplete paraplegic friend who uses an upright electric assisted trike similar to the Worksman Lightning. It lets him pedal when he wants and rest when he needs to, and he loves it. They're a bit pricier though at around $1300, and upright may not work for you. I hope that helps, and best of luck finding a bike!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      Ben is right, tadpole trikes are the way to go for two wheels in the front. You'll only really find recumbent versions, because an upright trike with two front wheels would be hard to make stable. :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Hi, your site is great and offers good info. I'm an incomplete quadriplegic and want to get back on the road again. The ideal bike for me would be similar to a Terratrike crossed with a hand pedaled bike. I have considerable weekness in all 4 limbs but could manage a bike if I could switch from hand propelled to leg propelled as either system tired? Have you seen any suck bike anywhere? All I've seen is either foot powered or hand powered but not a bike that does both. If not, can you tell me where I can find a terra bike tour or rambler in Onrario Canada? The dealers that are mentioned on Terrabike's website don't actually carry it anymore. They carry the Schwinn or Mobo only. I'd truly appreciate any help. None of the bike dealers in Ottawa had recumbent cycles for me to even just try out.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I read in the comments below that someone found the normal type trike to be or feel wobbly. I myself would like to see some manufacturer make a trike with two front wheels instead of the normal two in back, which would be much more stable

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: An upright trike won't go very fast, and 20 mph is the most you'll get. The TerraTrike recumbent bikes can go really fast, comparable to a bike. I'd look at those, in particular the 8 speed version.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I am looking for one, but one thing they're all LACKING is POWER.

      I want something that at least, if it has a 20mph top speed to suggest or sell options

      to bring the speed up to AT LEAST 40mph.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: I don't find the Schwinn to be wobbly. It's all about getting used to the 'feel' of how a trike turns. It will feel like you're tipping over at first, but it's just a strange sensation that you'll get used to with any trike (because with a standard bike you lean when you turn). That said, any trikes with smaller wheels will feel more stable!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      You failed to mention the Tri Rider Industrial, an excellent choice from Japan, used by their Postal service, comes with a 150 pound payload, 3 speed internal Schimano transmission, and large Industrial size tires, I have enjoyed mine for 3 years now with no trouble at all.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: The Tri Rider is a good choice, though they're pricier. You might check out Global Industrial Equipment's tricycles. They're all specced for 250 pound+ rider weight, and they're very stable. Be sure to opt for the 3 speed varieties. You might also consider an electric assist trike. As for the strap pedals, you'll most likely have to buy a separate set of universal pedals with straps and install them (very easy to install). I hope that's helpful!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I am a 6' 250lb male who suffered a traumatic brain injury and stroke as the result of a car accident in 2008. I am looking for an alternative for exercise and need something like a trike for balance and to exercise my dog. I believe a multi-speed is essential for the hills in the area. Do you have a suggestion on size, brand, and features? I liked the Tri-rider Industrial based on it rugged look, but I know nothing about trikes. I believe I will need weighted strap pedals to keep my left foot on the pedal because of my physical handicap. Any suggestions would be helpful.

    • profile image

      Lindle 

      5 years ago

      Wow! My cousin just learned how to ride a trike (He is 42) and he told me his favorite brand was Mobo Triton! He does not need a helmet! What a pro!

      -Lindle

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I've been looking at 3 wheeled bikes and was leaning towards getting the 26" Schwinn but I learned from a friend who owned one, that it was wobbly & ended up returning it. What kind of frame should I be looking for if I don't a wobbly ride? Also, I want to attach a child trailer or a rear child seat. Is there anything available out there for trikes? Again, what are your recommendations? Thanks.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @makingamark: Hmm, I know that Kent sells in the UK. You might also try searching for Viking, they have a few awesome folding options. Hope that helps!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @Greathaul2013: Thank you! It's true, they are way more prevalent around the world. Hopefully North Americans and Europeans will start using them too, they have great utility.

    • Greathaul2013 profile image

      Greathaul2013 

      5 years ago

      I see a ton of these tricycle bikes in China...people use them to deliver goods to the stores and restaurants...a lot of them are gas powered though. Cool lens. The TerraTrike is awesome.

    • makingamark profile image

      Katherine Tyrrell 

      5 years ago from London

      Wow - I never knew you could get tricycles for adults with lumbar support - that puts a whole new spin on things! Do you know which are the best trike manufacturers in the UK?

    • profile image

      LUMOSE 

      5 years ago

      Really cool.

    • MarthaBuckly profile image

      MarthaBuckly 

      5 years ago

      Really cool!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @BowWowBear: Thank you!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @chi kung: Comfortable and fun! It's kind of like a go cart. Definitely the most high performance of the trikes listed here. Thanks for the comment!

    • profile image

      PenofNM 

      5 years ago

      @BikePro: Thanks for the advice ... we compromised on a 24" aluminum TrueBicycle (got it online from them) and are having lots of fun. It'll do 16 mph on the downhill! We did have to swap out the 12" seat post for a 14" post in order to accommodate at heavier 5'7" rider, though ... the aluminum seat tube was slightly deforming at the top end due to the 12" post being extended near the top.

    • chi kung profile image

      chi kung 

      5 years ago

      the TerraTrike Rover is really funny but I heard it's very comfortable!

    • BowWowBear profile image

      BowWowBear 

      5 years ago

      Always looking at alternate forms of transportation. This is a nicely laid out and informative lens. Thanks for sharing!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @ohcaroline: Yes, they definitely have a different feel to the ride. With two wheeled bikes, a lot of the steering is actually done by a combination of counter steering and leaning. With trikes there is no counter steering, so when you turn it will 'feel' like you're about to topple over, even though it's quite stable. Just a matter of riding and getting used to the differences. Thanks for the comment!

    • profile image

      ohcaroline 

      5 years ago

      just in case anyone wants to know...i was able to get mine in the back of my van by putting it on its side.

    • profile image

      ohcaroline 

      5 years ago

      I own a Schwinn Meridian Cherry Red; but haven't used it a lot yet. I do find tricycles a little more difficult to steer after many years of bicycling...but I just need to adapt to how they feel and navigate. I'm happy with mine.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @BikePro: *They're. D'oh, grammar!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @MarkRobinson537: There certainly not everyone's cup of tea! But I think they look pretty good, and you'd be shocked how much fun they are to ride, very addictive!

    • MarkRobinson537 profile image

      MarkRobinson537 

      5 years ago

      lololol .... May be useful, but so dorky looking haha. In my opinion anyway...hehe

    • lynnasafriend profile image

      lynnasafriend 

      5 years ago

      This is cool for travelling!!!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @PenofNM: Definitely the 20". Generally, the smaller the wheels, the easier a bike or trike is to control and to pedal. But smaller wheels mean a lower top end speed, so it's a trade off.

    • profile image

      PenofNM 

      5 years ago

      which size is easier to peddle and control ... 26", 24" or 20"?

    • profile image

      loveloi 

      5 years ago

      @BikePro: Belated, thank you for info.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @marianadln: Hi there. Technically it's possible, but it depends on the adult tricycle bike in question and the child trailer. It might require some minor modification. If you point me towards the trailer and trike you're considering, I can take a look and let you know...

    • profile image

      marianadln 

      5 years ago

      Can you attach a child trailer to a 3 wheel bike?

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Very nice pros and cons.

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @loveloi: Hi there, sorry but no, most adult tricycles won't fit on a bus rack, they're too wide.

    • profile image

      loveloi 

      5 years ago

      Hello. I want to know if Schwinn Meridian fit for the bus rack. Is it?

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      5 years ago

      @ecahan1: Definitely! Go for a model with an upright sitting position and high handlebars, like the Westport, and you should be a lot more comfortable.

    • profile image

      ecahan1 

      5 years ago

      Hi, i have a bad back and a very athletic dog. Am thinking that a 3-wheel bicycle might help me get modest exercise and my dog lots of exercise!

    • BikePro profile imageAUTHOR

      Graeme 

      6 years ago

      @DonMcCyclist1: Did they get a Tristar? I haven't seen one up close or poked around at it yet, but they look solid! Love the parking brake feature they all have. The only Torker products I have real experience with are their unicycles (love 'em).

    • profile image

      DonMcCyclist1 

      6 years ago

      Clients of mine working on a localized print advertising delivery service invested in a Torker trike for the delivery agent. That's probably because of my role in their start up delivery division so far. I wish them the best. What do you think of Torker?

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