ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Fashion and Beauty»
  • Fashion Accessories

Cold Hands? How To Buy Good Winter Gloves

Updated on December 8, 2010

It's important to stay warm during the cold seasons of fall and winter. One of the most important piece of clothing we buy are gloves. Aside from our head, we lose most of our body heat through our hands. Gloves help keep blood flowing through our hands and prevent them from getting frostbites. Some gloves are good for chilly evenings while others are better for the blistering cold. Some even have pouches where you can insert hand warmers to further help keep your hands warm. There are three main things to consider when buying a pair of gloves. Price, function and comfort. A general rule when buying gloves is to choose 2 out of the 3 rules. There are also different types of gloves. Let's look at them and see which is right for you.


Under Armour Liner Gloves
Under Armour Liner Gloves

Liner Gloves

Liner gloves are light and thin. They are also very cheap. While they don't offer the best protection from the cold, they do have exceptional versatility. You can easily store a pair of liner gloves in your pockets and not notice them. Bigger and bulkier gloves are noticeable and take up more room. This means you wouldn't likely carry them due to space constraints. Most men's jacket have an inside pocket. A good idea is to carry a light pair of liner gloves inside your jacket pocket and keep it there. Liners gloves are generally plain and unisex in design. When your date or significant other gets cold hands, you will earn extra points when you offer them your gloves. Make sure to get them in a snug fit. If you get a more capable gloves, you can wear your liner gloves inside them adding another layer of warmth.


Winter Gloves

Dakine Titan Gloves
Dakine Titan Gloves

Winter gloves are big and bulky. They offer better heat insulation compared to liner gloves but they are also much less comfortable. You will lose a lot of dexterity with winter gloves. Be sure to try them on. You would want to get the most comfortable pair. Winter gloves are much more expensive than liner glovers. Expect to spend over $50 for a good pair. I own a pair of Dakine winter gloves made for skiing and they are fantastic. Materials are very important for a higher quality winter gloves. Leather gloves are an excellent material. They are durable and comfortable once you break them on. Leather acts as a second skin and is highly sought after for gloves. You can have a relatively thin pair of leather gloves that will do a great job of keeping your hands warm. Despite its advantages, leather has its downsides. Leather is not breathable. This means if you start to sweat in your gloves, your hands will stay wet. If you hands start to get cold after a sweat, it can freeze resulting in very bad frostbites.


My Dakine gloves are not made of leather. Synthetic gloves may not be as comfortable as leather but they are getting close. While they lack in comfort compared to leather gloves, they make up in versatility and function. My Dakine gloves have a Gore-Tex membrane. Gore-Tex is an artificial material that is both protective from the elements and breathable. Gore-Tex is made up of microscopic pores that are big enough to let water vapor to pass through but small enough that it prevents liquid water from penetrating. This is the advantage of a synthetic, high quality glove. While leather still remains the material of choice for casual wear, synthetics like Gore-Tex will out-perform in both comfort and cold protection in active conditions where sweat is a possibility.


Hand Warmers

A nice feature with these gloves is the hand warmer compartments. Hand warmers are usually small, disposable packets that creates heat when exposed to air. They are usually used by skiers and hikers but have recently become available to the general public. Now, you can go to your local drug store and buy some. In this case, when I know conditions are going to get frigged, I pack a pair or two in my backpack just in case.


Dakine Cougar Mittens
Dakine Cougar Mittens

Mittens

If you are faced with extremely cold conditions and have to go outside, then consider a different style of glove. The mitten. Mittens are not just for kids. Those who know better realize how good they are at keeping your hands warm. The mitten is used by many different people living in the arctic circle including Native Americans, Baltic people, and Vikings. The reason they are so good is they are designed to keep the fingers together. Keeping the fingers together means less heat is loss compared to traditional gloves. Mittens have less surface area compared to regular gloves. Although the mitten design is the best at keeping your hands warm, they do have a drawback. If you need to work outside, it may be difficult to do so. With mittens, you are basically handicapped to using 2 fingers including your thumb. Depending on your application, this may not be a drawback. 


Lobster Gloves

Pearl Izumi Men's Barrier Lobster Glove
Pearl Izumi Men's Barrier Lobster Glove

There is one other option when buying gloves. This is the lobster glove. Lobster gloves are relatively new. Popular among cyclists, lobster gloves fuses the advantages of mittens and the versatility of traditional gloves. Lobster gloves make it easier for cyclists to use the brake lever. With lobster gloves, you get 3 fingers. One dedicated to the thumb, one for the index and middle finger, and the last for the ring and pinky finger. Although lobster gloves are sold exclusively as cycling gloves, I can see them being used by people that want the warmth of mittens but also want the dexterity of traditional gloves.


"Different styles of gloves offer different benefits"

It is important to be prepared for the winter. Buying gloves may seem like a simple task but it's important to know and understand the different styles. Different styles of gloves offer different benefits. Some styles are more versatile while others offer more protection from the cold. Only you can decide which style is right for you. Be sure to keep this in mind next time you are buying a winter glove!


Join The Community

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)