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How to Handle Plastic Surgery Gone Wrong

Updated on June 14, 2019
Plastic Surgery Gone Wrong
Plastic Surgery Gone Wrong

When most of us hear the words "plastic surgery" we have an immediate image of someone who is dissatisfied with some part of their body and wants it corrected. Whether it is breast reduction, liposuction, collagen injections or a facelift, more and more people are placing themselves under the surgeon's knife to make the changes they feel nature shorted them on. For some it is a way of regaining confidence in their appearance, and therefore in other areas of their life. Others may feel they can recoup their youth by using plastic surgery to deny the telltale signs of the passing years. When making the choice, many do not tell those they love what they have planned. Opting for plastic surgery is a personal, even intimate decision for some of those who make that choice. When all works out well, there may not be a problem. There may be very different reactions, though; when it turns out they are faced with plastic surgery gone wrong.

That desire for a more perfect image can be far from the best reason to opt for such a drastic solution. In a few of the more bizarre cases, it has also led to an increasingly warped perception that if a little plastic surgery is good, more will be even better. A search of the internet will provide some grotesque pictures of people who have become so addicted to the surgeon's knife they are no longer recognizable. The saddest part is they continue down that destructive road, apparently unable to see that the results they are getting are far from good ones.

Surgery of any kind comes with risks. There can be complications, difficulties in healing or issues not uncovered before the surgery was attempted. Plastic surgery comes with the additional risks that the correction it was intended to make doesn't happen. A person with a preconceived idea of the magic they believe the surgery will perform may find that once the bandages are off, the results are far from magical. When that happens, what must be determined is the reason the results did not live up to the promise.

Some Important Discussions to Have

Before ever having any kind of plastic surgery, it is of the utmost importance to have an honest, thorough discussion with your surgeon that details exactly what results you can expect from your procedure. The hope is you had this discussion, and others, that helped you find a surgeon with a good reputation and good results. Should you find you did not achieve the results you desired, it's time to have another honest discussion with your surgeon.

The doctor should be able to evaluate a few things for you. They can talk with you about time needed for the full results to appear. It may take several weeks for your body to heal completely and for you to see the final results. Your doctor can speak with you about making another evaluation at a later date, or even doing additional surgery to accomplish more of the results you wanted.

Time can be an important component in other ways. You may find that the results improve when you wait a bit, or you may come to realize that your expectations were unrealistic. No surgical procedure can give you self-esteem all by itself. Plastic surgery can correct a physical problem, but that doesn't necessarily resolve an underlying issue that drives the need to change your physical appearance. It is possible that you need to evaluate some of the other aspects of your life and understand why you placed such importance on the surgery.

What If There is Clearly Malpractice Involved?

Should you find that your results do not improve, or should you immediately notice that there are some serious issues with the procedure that was done, it may be time to look at what recourse is available to you.

Talking with your surgeon should give you an idea of how to proceed. If communication between you and your doctor doesn't answer your questions, or you feel he or she is not listening to you, it may be time to take the next step. If you are looking at correcting any problems from the surgery, you can try to find another surgeon to do the work. This could involve additional costs to you so you should consider whether or not you wish to take legal recourse against the first surgeon.

This is not an easy option and will take an investment of time and possibly money on your part. A lawsuit should be considered very carefully beforehand. It should be based on clear-cut malpractice and not simply on the fact that the results did not meet your expectations. Legal compensation may also depend on proving that the results, no matter how unsatisfactory, had a tangible, negative impact on your quality of life. This can often be difficult to prove in court. You need to understand going in that this course of action will be draining, both emotionally and financially and you could end up without a successful judgment when it is all over.

Whether you do or don't choose to take legal action, another recourse available to you is to file a complaint with the state medical board. If you feel there was malpractice or incompetence involved in your surgery, this is one way to ensure that other potential patients don't end up with the same results. Your complaint may be only one of many this surgeon has received. Or you may be the one to provide the evidence they need to remove an unqualified surgeon from their practice.

No matter which choices you make, dealing with plastic surgery gone wrong (See more discussion here Plasticsurgerytalks.com) may take its toll on you and on your loved ones. The very issues that brought you to the choice of surgery can be complicated by poor results. Take the time to heal both mentally and physically and examine the next step you take carefully.

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