ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

History and Designers behind Vintage Ladies Compacts

Updated on December 20, 2008

Compacts for the Elegant Woman

Glamorous vintage compacts - ready to accessorize your handbag or be put on display in your collection.

What to Know about Collecting Compacts

Each week I receive at least one email asking me which compacts are best to collect. I always recommend collecting those you love. What good is a collection you're not really fond of? You would soon grow tired of the dusting and cleaning, they would be packed away somewhere and your investment of time and money would not be well spent. Stop and think about what attracts you to a particular compact. Is the shape, the color, the possible future value - or maybe all those reasons? If you're still not sure (and even if you are), I suggest investing in knowledge first. Buy books about compacts and read them - don't just look at the pretty pictures! When I was first starting out I had a compact book for a full year before it occurred to me to actually read it! I was so taken with all the photographs that I just didn't go beyond that. Once I started reading, the real learning began. I was no longer limited to knowing that one particular compact had more value than another - I began to understand why.

When you have decided what you want to collect, start hunting! Always try to buy in the best condition you can afford. Check latches to make sure they work well. Check for greening (corrosion) of the metal. Check the mirror. Some age spotting and clouding is inevitable with some of the old compacts. If it is a rare compact you might not be able to find again and the price is right, I'd go for it. If the compact is enameled or hand painted and there are large chunks of color missing, you may want to pass. Rarity is the key in this case too.

Quite often compact companies manufactured compacts in series. Two that come to mind are Kigu's "Bolero" series and Stratton's "Waterfowl" series. Owning each piece of a particular series certainly adds to the value of your collection.

To sum up - collect what you love, educate yourself and take good care of your collection. You own a little piece of the history of women.

Glossary of Compact Terms

Annulus: Flattened ring; circular plate with a central circular aperture

Art Deco: Artistic style prominent in the 1920s and 1930s. Took its name from L'Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exhibition of Decorative and Modern Industrial Arts), held in Paris in 1925. Influences included Art Nouveau, Ancient Egyptian architecture, and Cubism

Art Nouveau: Artistic style using curvilinear motifs derived from nature. Popular from circa 1890 to 1925 and frequently revived

Bakelite: Phenolic, acid based plastic, invented in 1907

Beauty Box: Vanity case containing cosmetic items other than powder and rouge, such as eye makeup

Butterfly Wing: Amazonian Blue Morpho Butterfly with wingspan of 9" used for costume jewelry and cases

Cabochon: A highly polished dome-shaped stone with no facets

Cabriole: An elongated S-shaped support

Cameo: Gem shell or stone with design or figure cared in relief against a background of a darker or lighter color

Carry-All: 1950 and 1960s term for a rigid case containing powder, lipstick, and feminine beauty aids

Cartouche: Decorative, framed space in which initials can be engraved

Chinoiserie: European decoration with a Chinese motif

Circa: Approximate date an item was manufactured

Compact: Small portable case used to contain face powder, usually comes with a mirror

Convertible Style: Interior adapted for either pressed or loose powder

Cream Powder: Or Crème Powder. Face powder combined with cream or oils to make it adhere to the skin. Used from the 1950s.

Engine-Turning: Technique by which regular patterns are cut into the surface of a metal object held in a lathe

Faux: Fake or false

Flapjack: Term used in the 1930s and 1940s for slim powder compacts. Cookie: to 2.5" diameter. Baby: 2.5" to 3.5" diameter. Standard: 3.5" to 5" diameter. Super: 5" to 6" diameter.

Godet: Metal pan used to contain pressed or cream powder

Inro: A small compartmented and usually ornamented container that is hung from a Japanese obi (sash) to hold small objects such as medicines, perfumes or cosmetics

Kamra: Case resembling early collapsible camera cases

Limoges: Translucent enamel of colorful portraits or scenes on copper that originated in Limoges, France

Minaudiere: Rigid metal, usually box-shaped evening bag with compartments for powder, lipstick, rouge, mirror, coins and cigarettes. The name is supposedly inspired by Estelle Arpels - cofounder with her husband of Van Cleef & Arpels. Her brothers used to say that no one could "minauder", or charm, in society like their sister Estelle.

Motif: In the style of or resembling

Necessaire: Bolster-shaped version of the minaudiere with fewer compartments

Party Case: Another term for "Carry All". Used in the 1950s and 1960s

Patch Box: Small round compact with a set-in lid, akin to 18th century box used for beauty patches or spots

Pendant Case: Compact or vanity case suspended from a chain or ring

Pli: A make-up tube containing powder and a puff brush

Portrait Case: Picture frame feature in compacts and vanity cases for snapshot insertion

Pressed Powder: Compacted dry face powder, contained in godets. Used during the 1920s and 1930s

Reticule: Small handbag that is held in the hand or carried over the arm

Sifter: Fine mesh or gauze, mounted on a rigid frame, which fits tightly into the powder-well of a compact; allows access to small quantities of powder while retaining the majority of the powder within the well

Sifter Box: 1920s and 1930s term for a compact for loose powder

Vanity Case: Rigid portable case designed to accommodate cosmetics and personal items

Wedgewood: Fine English pottery best known for a white cameo-like relief ware on a tined matte background

CARING FOR YOUR COMPACT

Cleaning your compact: Remove powder using a small dry toothbrush. The perfume in face powder can discolor the lacquer used on the metal. You can also brush the sifter and puff, shake them or tap them against a hard surface to remove powder. Swans down puffs can be washed and dried carefully. Other puffs should not be washed as they can and will disintegrate.

I have had several people express some concern about using a vintage compact that has had powder in it previously. I clean each compact thoroughly. Because of hygienic concerns, I have now also started to clean all previously used sifters and powder wells with an antibacterial agent. You can do this yourself by cleaning the sifter in a mild antibacterial dish soap solution or liquid hand washing agent. Be careful with the sifters as the mesh can tear from the rim.

Goo Off or alcohol can be used to remove adhesive labels from metal or glass.

Mirrors can be cleaned with Windex or a similar glass/mirror cleaner sprayed onto a cloth - not directly on the mirror.

Do not wash your compact by immersing it in water as water will leak behind the mirror and damage the reflective coating.

Compacts can be buffed and polished with a good quality silicone polish and a soft cloth.

Replacing missing stones: This can be done easily. Be sure to match the original color and size. Replacement stones are available online at jewelry supplies stores and are also sometimes available at craft stores. Hypo-cement is my favorite glue for replacing stones.

Replacing missing or broken mirrors: This is a tricky subject. If you have a very valuable antique compact with a broken mirror, I would advise leaving it alone. You could devalue your compact with a replacement mirror. If you want to replace a mirror in a compact you use, please read the following information.

The mirrors in vintage compacts were much thinner glass than is available today. Trying to put in a modern mirror can distort your compact case or break the hinge. That leaves you with the only two options I can think of: pirate a mirror from an old unusable compact of the same size and shape or find a reputable glass dealer with a supply of vintage mirror on hand.

Once you have your replacement mirror you can get to work. Some compact mirrors are "framed in". If yours is done in this style, study how the frame is closed and whether or not you are able to open it yourself. If not, search for an agreeable jeweler who will do this for you. (Warning - they are hard to find!) Mirrors that are just glued in can be loosened with judicious use of a blow dryer to soften the glue and a dental pick to pry it loose. Hypo-Cement can be used to glue your new mirror in place. If you are going to offer a compact with a replacement mirror for sale, please be sure to disclose this to the potential buyer.

Replacing Vintage Puffs and Sifters: If you are using the compact for your own personal use, any puff will do and can be easily found in stores that sell cosmetic supplies. Trying to find a vintage puff and sifter that go with your compact can be trickier. You will usually have to pirate a puff and sifter from a like compact that is unusable.

Stratton compacts are still being made (though not of the same high quality). I have searched long and hard to see if they have replacement puffs available. I have not found a source. I also have had customers in England ask where they could find Stratton puffs. That shot down my hope that Stratton puffs were available in the UK if only I could find the right store!

Storing your compact: Before storing your compact, be sure to remove all powder. Remove the sifter and puff. Vintage compacts are best stored in acid-free tissue paper or a film-front bag

History of Stratton Compacts

Stratton compacts were designed and produced in Birmingham, England by Laughton & Sons Ltd. from 1923. Some of the earliest Stratton compacts carry the name "Stratnoid", which was also the trade name for the company's knitting needles. In 1940, four of their five factories were destroyed during World War II. By 1946, they were up and running again. In 1997, this company was taken over by Cork International. Although they are still making compacts with the Stratton name, they are no longer manufactured in Britain. The compacts I am carrying were all made prior to 1997

Vintage Mother Of Pearl Floral Compact - Mascot Great Britain

Vintage Mother Of Pearl Floral Compact - Mascot Great Britain
Vintage Mother Of Pearl Floral Compact - Mascot Great Britain

Petite Princess Style Stratton Vintage Compact, Courting Couple

Petite Princess Style Stratton Vintage Compact, Courting Couple
Petite Princess Style Stratton Vintage Compact, Courting Couple

Designers behind the Compacts

BEHIND THE COMPACTS

Info on Compact Manufacturers

Annette: Can find no definitive info.

Baird-North Co: Providence, Rhode Island. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1930s.

Birks: Established in Montreal, Canada on March 1, 1879. In 1887 started a jewelry factory upstairs over the shop. Called the "Tiffanys of Canada". Specialized in Sterling Silver. Earliest registered hallmark under the Birks family name is dated 1564.

Bliss Bros. Co: United States. Making compacts in the period between 1930s to 1950s.

Boots: Boots the Chemist was established in Nottingham, England in the early part of the 1900s. Signed "Boots" in script or a "B" in script. Still in business.

Charbert: New York. Selling compacts in 1930s. Probably did not manufacture their own cases.

Charles of the Ritz: American cosmetics house located in NY, NY.

Ciner: United States jewelry manufacturer. Making compacts during the 1950s.

Clarice Jane: Division of Elgin American.

Colleen Moore: Cosmetics house. Probably started mass producing affordable compacts in the 1940s.

Coro: American costume jewelry manufacturer. Probably produced a limited range of compact designs beginning in the 1940s.

Coty: Paris, France early 1900s. The Coty trademark was registered in France on 9-15-14 by Francois Coty for Airspun Face Powder and compact container with white and gold powder puffs on an orange background. This design was a collaborative effort between Rene Lalique, famous glassmaker, and Leon Bakst, designer of stage sets and costumes for the Ballet Russe. Also a New York division.

Cyclax: England. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1920s.

Debbie J. Palmer: Contemporary compacts. Debbie J. Palmer spent 12 years as the Vice President of Design at Estee Lauder before starting her own production company in New York, New York. Victoria's Secret, Bloomingdales, Nordstrom's and Neiman Marcus are among the distributors.

DFB Co: Manufacturing vanity cases as early as the 1920s.

Djer-Kiss: M. Kerkoff of Paris, France. Exported to the United States in the 1920s. Had Kerkoff's Parfum Shop on the Champs Elysees in Paris. Compacts are usually small and silver in color. Very collectible.

Dorset Fifth Avenue: United States. Manufacturing compacts between 1930s to 1950s.

Dorothy Gray: American cosmetics house. Probably began mass producing affordable compacts in the 1940s. Taken over by the Playtex Co.

Dubarry: England. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1920s.

Eisenberg Original: American costume jewelry manufacturer. Limited number of designs in compacts probably beginning in the 1940s. Very collectible.

Elizabeth Arden: American cosmetic house. Probably began mass producing affordable compacts in the 1940s.

Elgin: United States. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1930s. Started out as the Illinois Watch Co. of Elgin, Illinois in the 1880s. Manufactured compact cases for many of the famous cosmetic houses. In 1950, commissioned Salvadore Dali to create a compact. The result was the "Bird-in-Hand" which featured a powder compartment, pillbox and lipstick. It came in three finishes - satin bronze, silver and sterling silver - all with 14K overlay on the wings. In 1963, after a very long labor dispute, the decision was made to close the Elgin American plant and move to Japan.

Elsa-Peretti: Contemporary compacts.

Enessa: England. Manufacturing compacts during the 1940s and 1950s.

Estee Lauder: Contemporary compact manufacturer. Has been manufacturing compacts for over thirty years from classic goldtone styles to a wide variety of figurals, often encrusted with Austrian crystals. Her first compact was the Youth Dew golden rope solid perfume compact with a faux turquoise stone in the center in 1968. Creates approximately 25 new designs per year.

Evans: United States. Established as the D. Evans Case Co. in North Attleboro, Mass. in the early 1920s. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1920s. Famous for their mesh bottomed compacts and their guilloche enamel. At some point in time, they became a division of Hilsingor Corp. of Plainville, Mass. Disappeared after 1965.

Evening in Paris: Part of the Bourjois line. In 1930, International Perfume Inc. of NY decided to market all its products under the Bourjois label. Evening in Paris and Springtime in Paris were two of their very popular lines.

Faberge: Prestigious jewelry house. Compacts were probably individually commissioned.

There is also a Faberge perfumer. New York circa the 1930s.

Fiancée: Part of the Woodworth line prior to 1930, but after 1930, International Perfume Inc. of NY decided to market all its products under the Bourjois label.

Flamingo: England. Established by the Fulmen Engineering Ltd in the early 1950s. Manufactured compacts for only a few short years.

Flato: Paul Flato opened shop in New York City in the 1920s as a jewelry designer. He is credited with designing the jewelry worn by Katherine Hepburn in "The Philadelphia Story". He made compacts in the 1940s and 1950s which were whimsical in design and now very collectible. The majority of his compacts also came with a lipstick which matched the compact.

Foster & Bailey: American. Turn of the century. Exquisite enameled vanities.

Georg Jensen: New York division. Georg Jensen was a very famous Scandinavian silversmith.

Girey: United States. Manufacturing compacts somewhere between the 1930s and the 1950s. Famous for their "camera" compacts.

Gloria Vanderbilt: Not the Gloria Vanderbilt of jeans fame. This was Mrs. Reginald Vanderbilt - nee Gloria Morgan. Opened a NY salon from July 1946 until October 1947. Mainly a parfumerie.

Gucci: Well known name in fashion. Producing contemporary compacts.

Gwenda: Gwenda was the trademark of Hussey-Dawson of Birmingham, England. Began manufacturing compacts circa 1930. Famous for their butterfly wing and foil compacts. At the time they were made, they were actually lower end compacts. Now, very collectible and rather high end. I was told by a British customer that the old Gwenda manufacturing plant is now being turned into an office building.

Halston: Well known name in fashion. Contemporary compacts.

Harriet Hubbard Ayer: New York. Trademark name registered by Vincent B. Thomas in 1907 for his cosmetics. The original Harriet Hubbard Ayer was a woman who manufactured Lady Recamier's Facial Creme in the late 1800s and also wrote a popular beauty advice column. HHA was in business at least through the 1950s.

Hattie Carnegie: American costume jewelry manufacturer. Probably did a limited range of compact designs sometime in the 1940s or 1950s.

Helena Rubenstein: American cosmetics house. Probably began mass producing affordable compacts sometime in the 1940s.

Henriette: Trade name for the New York division of the Wadsworth Case Co of Kentucky. Manufactured compacts during the 1940s and 1950s. Famous for their novelty compacts such as the 8-ball compact.

Hingco VAnities Inc.: United States. Manufactured compacts sometime between the 1930s and the 1950s.

Hobe': American costume jewelry manufacturer. Probably had limited number of compact designs sometime in the 1940s to 1950s.

Houbigant: France. Famous perfume house. Exporting compacts as early as the 1920s.

Innoxa: England. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1930s.

Jay Strongwater: Contemporary compacts.

J.M Fisher Co: Attleboro, Mass., United States. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1920s. Very Art Deco and Art Moderne case design. Very vivid colors. Each design had a name. Fragile enamels. Rarity may increase as the enamels deteriorate.

Jonteel: Cosmetics house. Probably began mass producing affordable compacts in the 1940s.

Katherine Baumann: Contemporary compacts.

Kigu: The first Kigu compact was created by Gustav Kiashek, a second generation master silver and goldsmith from Hungary. By the early 1920s, he had a factory in Budapest to produce these compacts under his firm's tradename - Kigu. The name Kigu was derived by KI-ashek, GU-stav. His son George came to England in 1939. The Kigu Co. was established by George Kiashek in Great Britain in 1947. Advertised their product as "compacts of character". Excellent compacts - beautiful, well engineered with quality materials. Made their very collectible "flying saucer" compact in 1951. Stopped making compacts in the late 1950s and manufactured costume jewelry. Taken over by the AS Brown Co. (Mascot) in 1977 on the death of Mr. Kiashek.

K & K: United States. Kotler & Kopet. Manufactured compacts sometime during the 1930s to 1950s.

Klix: Klix is the trademark of D. Harris & Co. of Great Britain. Began manufacturing in 1950s. Famous for their transparent plastic compacts with a simple print on lid.

Lady Esther: American cosmetics house. Another company that probably began mass producing affordable compacts in the 1940s.

La Mode: United States. Ripley & Gowan Co. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1930s.

Langlois: Cara Noma and Shari were two of its compact lines.

Le Rage: Great Britain. A division of the Evans Components Co. Manufactured compacts only during the early 1950s.

Lilly Dache: From what I can tell, Lilly Dache was a designer who was commissioned by different cosmetic houses to design compact cases.

Lucien LeLong: Paris. Cosmetics house.

Lucretia Vanderbilt: No definitive info

Madelin Beth: Contemporary compacts.

Majestic:

Margaret Rose: England.

Marhill: One of the leading manufacturers of mother of pearl compacts.

Marie Earle: A cosmetic house. Had their compact cases manufactured by another company.

Mascot: Trademark of AS Brown of England. Manufacturing compacts as early as the 1940s and signed "ASB". Began using the Mascot tradename in 1950. Famous for compacts shaped as handbags which were done during the 1950s. Absorbed the Kigu Co in 1977. Continued producing compacts into the

How to Care for Your Stratton Compact

DATING YOUR STRATTON COMPACT:

* If your compact has a self-opening inner lid, it was made after 1948.

* If your compact is convertible or takes cream powder, it dates from at least the 1950s

* If your compact has the famous "Compact in Hand" logo on the inner lid, it was made from 1950 to 1970. The "Compact in Hand" mark indicates the compact has a self-opening inner lid. This was patented in 1948 and is unique to Stratton compacts. It helped prevent damage to fingernails

See the About Compacts page for tips on caring for your compact and replacing missing parts, etc

My thanks to Juliette Edwards who wrote Miller's Powder Compacts - A Collector's Guide. This is a wonderful little book full of information and where I got my information about Stratton. This book is for sale in most places books are sold. Highly recommended. Click on the Amazon shopping cart on my front page of www.bitzofglitz.com -this will direct you to Amazon to purchase this book.

Your great grandmother, your mother or even you have a special story about how you received your compact.

Share your storys of your Compacts

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      bob 19 months ago

      could you help with info on le rage compacts

      thanks

      bob

    • profile image

      Melanie 2 years ago

      I have an oval sliver compact with butterfly and flower on outside wld like to any thing about it . Has no makers marks

    • profile image

      bob 2 years ago

      thank you great information have bookmarked look forward to reading on

    • profile image

      Nemo 2 years ago

      Great informative page!

      Your History of Compact Makers suddenly stops mid sentence with Mascot. Could you add the N to Z makers please.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I'm curious to know the approximate value of a Stratton cruise lines series compact? It is in really nice condition and is still useable. It has the RMS Scythia on the cover and contains the original mirror, which oddly enough still has the original sticker with directions for use. The sticker reads

      Important Instructions

      To Open inner lid press mirror lid gently back

      To Close bring mirror lid slightly forward

      and press inner lid down

      A STRATTON Patent

      I find this aspect to be more significant, as far as rarity is concerned and I think that it is pretty cool to have the original sticker still in place on the mirror, considering that this compact was used.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      wadsworth compact with lettering usn over an anchor(navy) --any value OR RAREITY ??

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      wadsworth compact with lettering usn over an anchor(navy) --any value OR RAREITY ??

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have two Stratton Compacts they were with my late Grandads possessions.. One is round and the other is an ornate shape. Both have the gold hinged compartment inside which you can open and this is were the powder went. Both are gold in colour and on the front have a picture of "SS Empress of France" were the picture is it is raised and soft plastic. I have tried online to find out about them for quite sometime. Can anyone shed some light on them and what the value may be. Both of them are in reasonable condition but no powder or puff.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a "Fiancée compact case /w Josephine Baker image. I was hoeing someone could tell me more about this ? acase

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I FOUND A COMPACT AND IT WAS A MERRY GO ROUND. NO NAME, JUST MADE U.S.A. SO WHO MADE IT?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      lipstick bronze case with a turquoise gem on the tube front- valuable??

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a compact that has a handpainted picture of Napoleon on porcelain? or some type of material that is similar and the powder puff inside has a little leather top with a little ring and the puff is made of some type of feathers. Does anyone know where I could get this appraised online or even just to find out how old it is. I live in a small town and there is nowhere around here to find out any information about it. Thank you.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @ResearchAddict: Can anyone tell me about this compact I've found selling at auction? I'm new to this and have no idea. Thanks guys. www.tooveys.com/lots.asp?WEBLOTID=225990&LOTID=1454

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Can anyone tell me about this compact I've found selling at auction? I'm new to this and have no idea. Thanks guys. www.tooveys.com/lots.asp?WEBLOTID=225990&LOTID=1454

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Maybe you can help me or I you could point me in the right direction I would be so thankful. I found this compact while metal detecting in my yard (1830's home). I can only see a date pat jan 1926. No name whatsoever. The compact is small and round with a small etched picture of flowers in the center. Inside it a mirrow that flips up. Can you tell me how I can find more info on a brand name or where it could be from. Thank you much.

      Ashleigh

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have a Marie Earle,double compact peach-light in itsown box and has never been used,I would say that it might be before the year of 1940 or even 30's the lady that gave it to me was 105 years old,I took care of her for 2 years. What could you tell me about it and is it worth anything. I also have a Elgin American compact that has never been used and in great shape also in its own box. could you tell me anything on this one also. Thank you,Chi

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      i have a very old birks sterling makeup compact-wonder it worth anything?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Lynne

      I found a sterling compact 2 years ago in an antique store. It's 2 1/2" square and 1/2" deep It's stamped "Sterling," on the outside of the compact, on the back. Under that mark was stamped "DOREL", but the name could be " DORE" or "DORCL" . The top of the compact has a stamped Art Deco stylized decoration with leaves and flowers within a square chain like border. The thumb push is very rudimentary 1920s style. I hope someone can identify the manufacturer of this beautiful compact for me.

      thanks Lynne

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      My great grandfather worked for GM in the 30's and 40's. He gave my great grandmother a black enamel clarice Jane compact that had the Chevy log in silver on the lid. I'm looking for more information about this simply for the history involved. Only other information I have found re this compact is that it's rare. Any more information would be helpful. Coutcherdavida@yahoo.com

    • ResearchAddict profile image

      ResearchAddict 5 years ago

      I've never had a nice compact like these but they are absolutely beautiful. You've included so much interesting history in your lens. Great job!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Dorothy June15,2012

      I have a compact with a picture of Marseille on the waterfront made in France.

      My greatgrand parents came from France,but my grandmother was born in Ohio.

      Do you have any information on such a compact?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hello: Great information! glad I found your site. I have a Stratton, red enamel, pheasant. It still has the tags, cloth bag, ring (plastic) and filter. I received as a gift years ago - maybe early 1980s. I don't think this would be vintage! When I do a search (ebay, web) it says they are vintage - and they are exactly the same. I would like to sell - as I have never used it and not really any sentimental value nor do I collect these. Any suggestions on how I can determine if this is truly vintage or its worth? Thank you!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hello, this is a lovely article about compacts! If anyone is trying to get hold of replacement puffs and sifters for their compacts, I'm selling official Stratton ones on Ebay for just over £5 and free postage. Have a look! x http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/270978283473?var=&am...

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @TheWhimsicalPea: I can try or you can even google them :)

    • TheWhimsicalPea profile image

      TheWhimsicalPea 5 years ago

      hi, love your story, i recently bought some at a garage sale, but don't know where to take them to know if they are worth anything. either way, i love them, can you help? thank you

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @Darlenedio: Darlene, I have been a member of Roselyn Gershon's club. I don't have the information at hand, but try googling her name and Ladies compact club. I will try to locate my papers on this. Hope you can find her!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      mine was my great grandmothers.I am just curious to know the value

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @glitzygramy: Hi,I have a Stratton cameo compact,opens up,then you have to open another area,then there is area for your powder,i also have with it a lipstick holder,that you put your lipstick in.it is covered with lovely little stones of some sort.just wanting to know ,how old it is.I got it from my Mother,as she no longer wanted it.I have googled a lot but nothing comes up for this specific compact.My email address is coleneduncan@bigpond.com.just also wanted to see if i had to insure this.hank you for taking the time to read this

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      This is Cherise again I forgot to give my email address....tjmyangel@hotmail.ca

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi I have my grandmothers compact. Not too sure but it is anywhere from the 1920s to 1950s. It had a picture of the queen of england on it but it ripped so I threw it out. I still have the compact itself and was hoping to sell it. It has GWENDA and BRITISH MADE wrote it in. It still has the powder applier and the mirror isn't broken. I live in a town where I can't find anyone to appraise any antiques for me. If you could give me some guidance that would be so appreciated. Thankyou.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi,

      My aunt was a WAC during WWII. I have her induction papers dated 1943. I have a round red, enamel compact with gold scrollwork around the edges. It was in a ClariceJane box and has a ClariceJane powderpull and rouge interior with original label inside. I cannot find any comparables on line that tells me that ClariceJane made compacts for the army during WorldWarII. My question is whether the actual compact with the WAC insignia on the cover has any relationship to ClariceJane? Do you know about this?

      Any information about this compact would be greatly appreciated.

      Thank you.

      Susan Cain

      s.cain0630@gmail.com

    • glitzygramy profile image
      Author

      glitzygramy 5 years ago

      @anonymous: over 20 yrs is vintage over 100 is antique :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Can anyone tell me how old a compact has to be to be classed as vintage?

    • glitzygramy profile image
      Author

      glitzygramy 5 years ago

      @Darlenedio: I know nothing about those type of shows or clubs-- just doing any antique show would be the thing to do- check your local area

    • profile image

      Darlenedio 5 years ago

      I am having such a hard time finding out information on compact club events and shows or any vanity acessory clubs/shows....just signing up has been difficult and I am ready with a collection and cash in hand. The web sites seem to be outdated ..last update on moat 2011 and showing event info from last year! please send me info on Vegas event in June, and a site thAt will let me sign up to become a member! Thank you!

    • profile image

      Darlenedio 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hello,

      Did you ever find the value of the Bird in hand compact? I love thar one, are you thinking of selling it? Darlene

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I recently inherited a compact which commemorates the 1953 Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. It is in a Kigu box but it does not actually say 'Kigu' anywhere that I can see on the compact itself. Can anyone confirm it is a Kigu or suggest which company made it if not Kigu? It depicts seven items used in the Coronation i.e. the sword of state, the orb, St Edward's crown etc. Can anyone suggest a value and where best to try to sell it if I decide not to keep it?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi! I have a VELT(politicial) Evans compact. Can anyone tell me anything about it? The front is sort of looks llike a ceramic tile with a rose with VELT printed on top of it. It is appears to be gold elsewhere. Inside there is a mirror....powder and a powder applicator. It is quite nice...passed down in the family.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have a Salvador Dali designed "bird compact" in the silver finish.It was my mother's. It still has its original American Elgin box. It is in excellent condition just showing wear.from gentle use.Does anyone have an idea of its worth?

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Hi I have a Stratton compact its round and has a mirror inside along with a little puff with Stratton on on the outside is a press button on the front. On the top is AIR FORCE STATION BRUGGEN SEEK AND STRIKE on the rear is just the word "Stratton"

      Does anyone have idea of date and how much it would be worth?

    • profile image

      Rivergull 6 years ago

      @anonymous: There's loads of stuff on internet about your Girey compact. Why are you having trouble finding info? http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/2030999

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have a stratton compact i am tring to date , it is rectangle,embesseled with compact in hand symble.however this one has a pop up lipstick holder

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Many years ago I purchased a brass cigarette case with mother-of-pearl blocks on the lid. Today, I purchased the matching lighter, lipstickcase, and perfume bottle. From what I can tell, they're Elgin American Beauty. I think there may be a compact that matches the set. I'm wondering if there are any other items I may be missing, and the approximate age of the set.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      My late husband gave me a Stratton silver compact that has my initial engraved on it. I have chershed it for over 40 years. Sunday after church I dropped it in the parking lot and the insides, all except the mirror, flew in all directions. I think I retrieved all the pieces but am unable to get them to go back together....is there a company that can repair it for me.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have just found out that the oblong shaped compact I have had for over 20 years that I got from an opportunity shop is a KIGU lipstick and powder compact. It has green and red gems in diamond pattern and has never been used. original powder puff and mesh. Im very excited with the find and think it dates back to the 30s or 40s. Has anyone got any information on these compacts or has one.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Did you ever find any info on this piece. I have been searching for info on a similar compact from the Worlds Fair and am unable to find any value/info.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I have powder compact from my mother compact is red and soilder and girl waying good buy and said on compact WHEN THE WORLD START I'LL BECOMING BACK TO YOU

      LOOKING FOR PICTURE OF IT ONLINE NOT ABLE TO FIND ONE

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I have a rare Classic gem-cut Compact made by Bucklein Creations during WWII. 2000 were made and this is #500. The compacts were made of airplane windshields and were stored in Bucklein's garage until they were rediscovered. Does anyone have an idea of the value?

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Hi,

      I just recently purchased a gold mesh compact with a matching pouch with soft black velvet backing and the front, gold mesh,from a charity shop. It does not have any label on it but on scrutiny, I discovered a subtle marking of two interlocking circles at the side of the inside rim of the bottom compact lid. Does anyone know which company produced this very attractive compact? I am at my wit's end trying to know if the markings are gold hallmarks or a company's logo or just some markings of where it is made. Please help! Email: dsilvanu@yahoo.com.sg

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      HI ITS ME AGAIN MICHELLE GURULE YOU CAN EMAIL ME IF YOU CHOOSE!!! mag2010@hotmail. com

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I HAVE AN ANTIQUE BLUSH COMPACT 1939 NEW YORK WORLD FAIR, LOGO INSIDE IS GIREY ! FAIR COND. ANY IDEA WHAT ITS WORTH IS?OR MABY A COLLECTER THAT'S INTERESTED?? CAN'T SEEM TO FIND IT ONLINE ANYWHERE , IT MAY BE RARE, IT REALLY IS A BEAUTIFUL PIECE!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I HAVE AN ANTIQUE BLUSH COMPACT 1939 NEW YORK WORLD FAIR, LOGO INSIDE IS GIREY ! FAIR COND. ANY IDEA WHAT ITS WORTH IS?OR MABY A COLLECTER THAT'S INTERESTED?? CAN'T SEEM TO FIND IT ONLINE ANYWHERE , IT MAY BE RARE, IT REALLY IS A BEAUTIFUL PIECE!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I'd appreciate it if you could give me some information on a butterfly wing painting I have. It's a lovely bowl of anenomes, the anenome petals are made of butterfly wings. The signature on the bottom left hand side clearly reads "Dawson". Could "Dawson" possibly be somebody from Hussy-Dawson, the company that used to manufacture Gwenda butterfly wing compacts in the '20s/'30s? Do you think this painting may be worth anything?

    • profile image

      1001OJG 7 years ago

      Nice topics! I like this articles, I am looking this type of articles and finally I got this, I want more about this articles.

      Thanks for this nice articles.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I just put a great Old Hollywood compact on my web site. http://www.glitzandglamourofoldhollywood.com

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I just purchased a Star Queen compact at an estate sale the lid is black velvet with a gold embroidery. Any idea when these were made and what they are worth. They were asking $40 for it, but I paid $20.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Hi, I thing the jewelry is beautiful be decorated for all lady's, naver mine who is lady's type!.

      Just choose the true jewelry.

      Your Honest

      juruteknik

      http://jewelryandwasher.blogspot.com

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      http://www.bitzofglitz.com/compacts/tn_tonight1001...

      is it like this if in great condition at least 50 or more

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Just bought one at an antique store for $5 but never knew the history, I just thought it was pretty. It is gold with flying geese on the front and the Stratton name. Any idea when it was made? robradmore@hotmail.com, thanks

    • profile image

      muddlerminnow49 8 years ago

      Hi! I wasn't sure exactly what I was looking at...but had wife look over my shoulder...She loves what she sees...Not all we need is that little thing called extra$$...LOL...Looks great!!!

    • profile image

      Marshell 8 years ago

      You did good!:>) They are beautiful.

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 8 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Wow! I don't have any, but now I want one, or a collection. These are beautiful! Great information!