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Gorgeous Chic & Fun Scarves Hats & Wraps for Cancer & Other Hair Loss

Updated on May 27, 2016

My Own Chemo Hair Loss Story

I Cut My Hair Off Before it Came Out on its Own And I Began Covering my Bare Scalp

I turned my journals into daily drawings during treatment. Knowing my hair would soon fall out I decided to subvert the process and slew it myself. I'd read too many stories of women waking up to a hair-pillow-cover.

It was easy to pull it out once the chemo med had snipped the hairs at their roots. It could have been a comic show for the results! *Try to resist following suit.

PHOTO CREDIT: detail from my Chemo Journal Drawings series. copyright 1999 by Leslie Sinclair - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED - no use permitted

I forgot to douse my follicles in toner and ended up with breakouts all over my scalp. Chemo squashed my immune system so once my scalp was challenged it didn't recover for the whole 8 months.

Now that's something worth covering up! ***as a postscript - since my Rosacea dx wasn't made until years later, or more likely, I didn't hear my dermatologist's dx for a decade, no treatment worked. Now that I know about the nature of those devastating outbreaks and what measures free me from them, I can live mostly outbreak-free.

If that tidbit of my personal history left you queasy - begin breathing easily! The rest of this page will entertain you, educate you, astound you, and amuse you. Scarf-wearing can be necessary in some circumstances, like when the winter winds blow and you decide enough of this clear crystal cap from the icy deluges!

This is my Special Review of tips, techniques and items for the woman with hair loss caused by medical condition. When chemo cuts your hair cover it up using these tricks and resources.

A Scarf I Wore During Chemo

We have lots of choices now for how to cover our bald heads. From glitz and glam in hand-painted and gussied-up silk and viscose to gentle organic cottons. We can tie a bandanna at the back of the neck or softly wrap a turban. We can slip on a soft cotton knit undercap and top it off with a ball cap or spritely summer brimmed hat.

This could be the very one I had for treatment, and it is one of the styles I have worn ever since. It has the feel of featherweight fabric made of gossamer petals. I love this scarf and you will too. Mine has shades of cream and pink.

Multi Flowers Leopard Pattern Tassel Ends Sheer Square Scarf Sarong
Multi Flowers Leopard Pattern Tassel Ends Sheer Square Scarf Sarong

This soft and lightweight tassels ends sheer square scarf including different kinds of flowers and leopard patterns. The scarf measures 44 inches length and width (50 inches including tassels). You can wear it around your neck and shoulders as a scarf, fold it in half as a triangle wrap shawl, and wrap it around your hair/scalp to add some freshness.

Great for dressing up any outfit all year round, suited for both formal and casua. And it also makes a great gift for your friends and loved ones. Available in 4 colors: Gray, Pink, Blue and Brown. Machine or hand wash.

 

You'll Get the Knack for Scarf Wrapping

It can be puzzling, like when you position your laptop just right so you can glance back and forth from the scarf-wrapping videos to your mirror and decide there's some more practice to make.

It can also be by choice, like when you notice that the model's color selection reminds you of how you just could combine a filmy lilac wrap with your cinnamon sheath; and scarf-wearing can be a tease for your best friends to see the wild ways you learned to tie a scarf!

My Pro Tips for Covering the Bald - Anchoring your beautiful scarf to the baldness on top

Since my baldness began in Summer I first wore a tiny scarf under an old sunhat. It didn't fool anyone. I didn't even have eyelashes. My chemo took place long before I first entered the world of the Internet. Funny me! Several times during a walk I'd need to remove my hat and adjust my scarf to get it up out of my eyes. Today it's easy to find special gripper headbands such as I feature near the end. Slip on a headband and securely tie on a scarf or turban.

  1. NOW that we've got you covered - back to scarf-wrapping! Start with the soft, lightweight terry turban below. It'll cover you up with a snug feeling you need right now. Nothing can be easier than popping on a standby turban - get half a dozen different colors now - for when an unexpected visitor shows up with a chemo gift - or to keep you warm when you go out for an early weekend latte. Under a turban you control the flow of information during the day, and maintain the snuggle at night!
  2. Choose a lightweight cotton underscarf, a small square tied at the base of your neck - like a bright or muted color bandana (fold it into a triangle, placing the long end above your eyes, and the two ends at the back, then tie a knot). Cotton tends to stay put, creating an opportunity for expression of power over something in your life, at a time when you might feel a weenie bit powerless "Stay Put!"
  3. Try using a stretch headband over your late hairline, and pin your scarf to that. You can adjust the headband, up or down, depending on the look you are aiming for.
  4. Avoid those lovely silk scarves because they tend to retain head heat and you've got enough things to be hotheaded about already!
  5. Look for the soft cotton snug caps in links below. A lovely rayon scarf ties or pins beautifully to one of these comfortable undercaps. These are a lightweight cotton knit, more suitable for pinning a scarf onto, especially if you plan to use a series of hatpins or a heavier brooch. Please take a look at all the colors available.

    If your scalp is strong and healthy, and you can bear the feel of a snug undercap, and you are confident pinning into a very thin cap (to hold your rolled or folded scarf on), get very inexpensive and lightweight wig caps that are made to confine the hair under a wig. If you simply must have silk, and you lost the poster putty, try to use it as a loose overscarf. Maybe choose a thin shimmer of silk to tie around a chic cap so you get the glam without the sweat.

  6. In the beginning, as you adjust to having a bare head, a soft turban is comforting and easy, and lightweight turbans even fit under the long turban wraps. You can even wear a turban over an undercap. Or, you can select a soft hat from the selections below. Tilt the turban or hat to the side for a flirty feel, even if it's only with your visage in the mirror! Treat yourself well - you're worth it!
  7. If a lace cap and an overscarf still don't feel like the cake's been frosted, then pop on one of a variety of these great hats!

My Friends and I Love This Cap

Abbey Cap Women's Chemo Hat Beanie Scarf Turban Headwear for Cancer Ruffle Purple
Abbey Cap Women's Chemo Hat Beanie Scarf Turban Headwear for Cancer Ruffle Purple

I wear this supple pre-shaped cap in many colors. It's so lightweight I scarcely feel it.

Sometimes I turn it to the side and wrap a folded scarf around like a ribbon, tying it in the back, with the ends knotted twice and hanging about 4" down. The great range of patterns and colors is so appealing I own several.

 

Luscious Bamboo Rayon Prestyled

Luxury Bamboo Turban for Cancer Patients 3-seam (GREEN SAGE)
Luxury Bamboo Turban for Cancer Patients 3-seam (GREEN SAGE)

Choose from a variety of colors, a styled wonderful feeling turban. I like how it looks like it's actually hand wrapped and the fabric is grand and smooth.

 

Does Breast Cancer Affect Your Life?

Do you have, or have you had, breast cancer?

Gorgeous Creative Bare Head Covers

Each long scarf is wrapped separately. The underscarf is stretchy and very long. It shows a great foundation. The outer scarf is a heavier textured patterned cloth. Enjoy!

These Would Have Been My Favorite Chemo Caps

Had I only known about Abbey Caps back when I had a bald head

I'm pretty certain

these would have been super handy hats to have on hand.

Chic Abbey Caps

Easy Wear Soft Fleece Cloche

Abby Fleece Cloche Hat
Abby Fleece Cloche Hat

You know how just a change of scenery can refresh your mind - well, a change of head covering can bring a refreshing viewpoint to the cancer patient. This cloche looks snappy and smart.

Like a nifty green tye-dye with spiraling embroidery on a super soft cotton knit.

 
Chemo Cap Beanies, Cotton Knit, Easy Pretied Cancer Turban Headwear for Women, Hair Loss Patients
Chemo Cap Beanies, Cotton Knit, Easy Pretied Cancer Turban Headwear for Women, Hair Loss Patients

If I'd discovered the Abbey Cap during chemo I would have bought a half-dozen. Although they are made of viscose I could have slipped a lightweight undercap on and then the perfectly wrapped Abbey Cap.

I wear them now in a variety of colors and patterns. They always stay put and hold volumes of hair.

 

Smashingly Easy Turban Tie

Ingeniously easy design makes looking great a cinch! You'll want to wear this style long after your treatment phase is over. It's fun and smart all at once.

Viscose Means Wrapping Finesse As Above

LibbySue-100% Cotton Batik Splash Print Scarf in Multi-Colors of Green, Orange
LibbySue-100% Cotton Batik Splash Print Scarf in Multi-Colors of Green, Orange

Here's how to wrap this stunner:

1. Hold one end 6" above fringe in left hand

2. Place over head, still grasping, as above, hold left end in place below l. ear

3. Wrap the scarf held in right hand around back of head and over forehead and back around to where you are holding l. end

4. Keep ends tight and tie knot below and behind l. ear

5. Arrange folds across head and at r. side, and pull any loose areas into knot or tuck them under along fold lines on head

6. Pull top end of tie down and to one side of knot, or tie double knot.

7. Let ends dangle! This wrap looks and feels elegant to wear.

 

Try a Superwide Stretchy Headband

A Clever Twist Tie

What could be easier than to finish off a back-tied long scarf with a bun finish in back!

Get Good Cover & Be Stunning - Pop a Sun Hat On & Dress It up with a Gorgeous Scarf

Each time I went out walking or on errands, during treatment and after, I wore a sunhat or rain hat on top of a lightweight and soft scarf - or I might wear a soft undercap under the hat. With breast cancer I became much more conscious of the need to prevent skin cancer, so I wear a brimmed hat to protect my face.

Use a square or a long skinny scarf to color coordinate with your outfit, to tie onto your hat. It gives a lift to your spirit and brightens your day

Convertible Crown UV Protection Hat - Pink
Convertible Crown UV Protection Hat - Pink

What makes this hat special is its wide brim and that shades the face, even the sides - at the same time as it covers the hair.

An added bonus is that it's two hats in one. Wear it has a full coverage cap and unbutton the top for a spiffy visor later on.

 

Back When I Had Breast Cancer............

Family death, separations, divorce, job hunt, financial crash, and breast cancer too. Sometimes I was just grateful to have too many distractions to focus on a single one so I tended to bounce from one to another - leveraging just so much stress to one thing, in passing.

Breast cancer - with me heedless to my high risk category - sat atop my worry hat like a bouncing tassle. Early onset menses, no childbearing,........and the third sign escapes me right now.........those three had earned me the HR designation, but it had run off me like Spring rain off a metal roof. I simply hadn't paid attention. It was only my second mammogram - and I had had my yearly provider exam within the month.

But intuition caught me by the throat when the "need for additional study" letter arrived, and I rushed off to take care of some of those other items on the list, still glowing like neon. The one bright and positive event I scheduled was the date for my "Shaddah", my conversion to Islam - two weeks (it turned out) before the pending surgery. From the conviction in my heart that I had found my spiritual home in Islam I claimed the strength I would need to face an uncertain future.

The next mammogram showed a mass with irregular borders and the radiologist rushed me into the Ultrasound Room - where her suspicions were confirmed, but I wasn't told. In the evening my Primary Provider called me with a question: "why hadn't I told her about the lump?" I didn't know about any lump until that phone call when she told me where it was...............and I folded my elbow and placed my index finger at the spot she described: "about 1 inch at 1 o'clock"!

No one else, no family members and no friends, knew about the likelihood of my having breast cancer. A chronically healthy woman, I truly believed I would be the exception to the 3-Strikes = High Risk rule. My Nurse Practitioner had called to schedule a "first-thing Monday morning" appointment to discuss surgery and the ensuing year as a breast cancer patient.

Covering with Bandana, Tichel & More

Overview of scarf fabrics and styles, including those for cancer and allopecia patients.

You'll Be Rarin' To Go In This Number

Comeaux Caps 118-1000-7-3/4 Deep Round Crown Caps, 7 3/4", Assorted Prints
Comeaux Caps 118-1000-7-3/4 Deep Round Crown Caps, 7 3/4", Assorted Prints

If I'd found a hat like this I'd have bought it in a minute. It's got allover coverage, even the nape of the neck.

It makes a take-charge statement, adding a fun touch to casual dress.

 

Her Beautiful & Creative Head Wrap!

ok, it's an exaggerated style, but it can be modified

.1. Use slightly stretchy fabric, over a well-fitting and comfortable chemocap.

.2. Stand up, and lean over forward with head hanging down towards the floor.

.3. Take 3 yards of fabric off the bolt, folded in half lengthwise.

.4. Lay the folded edge around hairline, tucking in behind ears.

.5. Keep wrapping in one direction, rolling shorter piece of fabric under longer piece.

.6. Now stand up and look in your mirror.

.7. Grasp the remainder of fabric strip, continuing the wrap.

.8. Gather the long tail of fabric to narrow it, and gently wrap it to the end.

.9. Tuck end under one of the wrap layers.

10. Trim it if you like, by wrapping a ribbon around it and securing with pins or tucking ends under.

“Turns out this video can't be embedded, so here is the link ”Super High Innovative Wrap

My Favorite-ever Chemo Hat

the first on the list belowl

It satisfied my every need during that Summer of Chemo

THE Hat I Wore During Treatment - such a wonder of styles to choose from

Parkhurst 11.5 Inch Cotton Knit Beret for All Seasons
Parkhurst 11.5 Inch Cotton Knit Beret for All Seasons

I have this cap in white. It is one hat I can always count on in a jiffy, and it always looks right, with its deep crown.

One of the things I love about Parkhurst is that they fit more than one size head.

I have hair now, and sometimes tuck my hair into this hat. This is the larger size, plenty roomy, without pinching.

 

Fun Front & Side Stunner Styles - it's all in how you twist the ends

Do the first wrap. Secure it with pins. Do not tuck the ends in because they are beautifully trimmed, if you buy the scarf below. Artfully arrange the tasseled ends and secure them with pins if they moved too much. You may consider tucking a couple ends in, and just arranging two or three tassels.

Video shows one chic style after another. First don a lightweight turban or undercap, then play. It's sure to be enjoyable.

Decade Post-Breast Cancer Musings

Every aspect of my life has been colored by the breast cancer treatment I received in 1999. Yea! I'm a 12-yr survivor of this dread disease.

But the chemo and the radiation put such a high level of stress on my nervous, muscle, skin, respiratory, etc. systems that network in my brain.

Chemo hit me hard. Radiation pummeled my ribs, collarbone, lungs, heart, diaphragm, and scarred these parts.

Who ever heard of peripheral neuropathy or fibromyalgia or sleep apnea, or choosing your bra size for comfort of the sensitive tissues wrapping the ribs below the breast line.

Ha! I wrote the closing lines in this section with a bit of exaggeration because, prior to cancer, I'd never heard of the conditions, but docs have tagged them with a chemo/radiation-genesis in my case.

So, back to my realization this year that I've been 14-yr cancer-free ----- oops! not really, because thyroid cancer showed up 11 years ago! That's still a hefty chunk of time though.

Awareness of the impact of my mother's recent death at the same time that the 12-yr mark hit my consciousness, brings a sweetness to my life. It reminds me, that through a focus on natural foods, exercise, prayer, good works, sensitivity to others' situations, the severity of many of my conditions had lessened.

“I can equate joy in wearing a beautiful cancer cap or scarf, to dawning awareness of ways to effect the rest of my life.”

More about My Story

life before breast cancer

Six years prior to Breast Cancer knocking at my door I received an MFA in Painting and Drawing.

This was an exciting day. The ceremony took place in June, but my program culminated with my MFA Thesis Show at the end of September.

Since I taught classes at the university during the Summer I opted to continue with my body of work throughout that time.

A return to college concurrent with two of my children felt at times like my initial college years revisited.

Long summer days immersed in art production shared time with literal immersion in crisp river water that runs through a local swimming pond. I painted in the morning, and took off for an hour of swimming, to return refreshed for painting sessions that lasted deep into the night.

Although my gynecologist informed me, during those graduate school years, that I was High Risk for Breast Cancer, I shed that notion as easily as I shed lake water, after swimming. Had I had precognition of the reality of my own breast cancer, the one change I would have made would have been to begin eating organic and gluten free back then. Learn more about Me

My Head Has A Wonky Shape So Bald Wasn't My Favorite Profile

If you experienced chemo or allopecia baldness, did you wear a cover-up?

Visit your care center's chemotherapy beauty center

I felt transformed by the lovely Irene who provided scarves and hats and showed me how to use them. If that is not an option, many organizations provide scarves, and hats. Find several below.

More Headwear Resources For You

Find your style in cancer coverups. Modesty elegant and baseball-slamming team caps, tiny lace caps under gracious great rayon velvet wraps, and just the right look for every lady and gentleman who wears the badges of chemotherapy or just plain loves the feel of glorious scarves, caps and turbans.

Breast Cancer Did a Number on Me

ChemoWraps is my first article on how to cover a bald scalp and do it in style. It is a well stocked scarf, headwrap, hat and cap resource, peppered with bits of my story, and others' stories. I include a short section on a complication I live with, from chemotherapy damage to my Peripheral Nerves.

If you, or a friend or family member suffers pain or numbness in feet and/or hands, please read my lens that describes what Taxol chemotherapy did to me. My purpose is to alert others to an often debilitating condition that lays me up worse than chemo ever did.

Unfortunately my medical oncologist glossed over "complications" of my particular chemo regimen. He didn't mention anything that could befall me, other than hair loss, which was a certainty. Well, I knew that chemo induced baldness was temporary --- especially because my version of ductile infiltrating carcinoma was rated at "Stage One!"

What medical oncologist didn't tell me was that I may succumb to something that would be a lifelong plague - that is, in the allopathic world. Since I didn't know what the symptoms of "complications" from my treatment "might" be, The medical oncologist also did not tell me what to do, if anything to prevent those symptoms.

The intention here is to alert others who have chemo to be aware that these symptoms can indicate Peripheral Neuropathy. My primary doctor told me that I have PN, years ago, a decade or so.

Because I had ocular migraines, so was already taking a med to prevent them, in increasingly higher doses, the neurologist and primary just kept upping the doses. Not a word was spoken about what the neuropathy really meant.

They each told me that the condition was permanent, and that "it only becomes worse." Today there is hope for recovery or improvement, and my natural treatment regimen is a success. Read about how I am impacted by Peripheral Neuropathy

Research & Education is Vital for Disease Prevention & Awareness

How do you support breast cancer research and awareness?

I Appreciate Your Reflections on My Story & Your Breast Cancer Experience

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    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @sha-ron: It's my sincere pleasure to share this collection with others who have needs caused by hair loss. Thanks

    • sha-ron profile image

      sha-ron 3 years ago

      Great lens and these ideas should help many people suffering from cancer.

    • shadowfast7 profile image

      Sure Temp 3 years ago

      lots of good info :)

    • shadowfast7 profile image

      Sure Temp 3 years ago

      lots of good info :)

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @anonymous: One never knows what will transpire when the unexpected happens, and I just knew how I felt and how much I would have benefited from such tips as I give.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Terrific page! Your attitude is amazing!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @PNWtravels: We are an ever-widening-the-boundaries circle of grateful folk.

    • PNWtravels profile image

      Vicki Green 3 years ago from Wandering the Pacific Northwest USA

      So glad that you are a cancer survivor and that your sense of humor is still alive and well, too. You've turned a very somber topic into something uplifting and enjoyable to read.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @norma-holt: Thanks for your comments. There's so much to learn about cancer and it's all interesting.

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 3 years ago

      Great lens. Sorry to hear of your problems with this horrible disease. Congrats on LOTD

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @mel-kav: Thank you! All prayers are welcomed, as every now and then when it's time for another mammogram I do find it challenging to quiet the fears.

    • mel-kav profile image

      mel-kav 3 years ago

      This is a beautiful lens! Thank you for sharing your story. I say a prayer right now that you continue to remain free of cancer. You are truly a survivor.

    • betara-indra profile image

      betara-indra 3 years ago

      hi i am Greetings from Indonesia, may I join you

    • profile image

      tahirmahmood 3 years ago

      LOVE the lens!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @queenofduvetcover: Thanks. This is my first conceived lens.

    • queenofduvetcover profile image

      queenofduvetcover 3 years ago

      Really nice lens. =)

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @Jogalog: Thanks, it's something I had wished I could have found during my experience.

    • Jogalog profile image

      Jogalog 3 years ago

      I think some of these hats are lovely and I'm sure they really help cancer sufferers.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @Belva Boggs: Thanks BelvaBoggs. I hope we live to see the day when chemo caused baldness, and that from alopecia too, are things of the past.

    • Belva Boggs profile image

      Belva Boggs 3 years ago

      This lens is very needed. Great versatility! Thanks.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 3 years ago

      @richardrose: It's what brought me to Squidoo in the first place.

    • profile image

      richardrose 3 years ago

      Beautiful lens and very kind of you to share your journey with us.

    • weakbond profile image

      Nnadi bonaventure Chima 4 years ago from Johanesburg

      Highly informative lens , thanks for sharing

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @sierradawn lm: Thank you. i'm pleased.

    • sierradawn lm profile image

      sierradawn lm 4 years ago

      Congratulations on your LOTD! This article is heartwarming, inspiring, and very beautifully done. Well deserving of LOTD!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I deeply appreciate the opportunity to tell the story and am so happy to spread help and awareness. Thanks.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 4 years ago from Fresno CA

      Very informative. It helps to hear a woman's perspective who is/has gone through it. My dear cousin wore hats through her chemo but, sad to say, she didn't survive. Mother of three, she died at the age of 38. Now that is just not right! People need to know and make a fuss. A decade has passed and I still mourn her loss. Her little twins are just starting college this year. She missed so much.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @PAINTDRIPS: Tears sprung into my eyes in reading your tender message of loss and concern. Personally, i believe the severity of environmental links is such that we need to examine our diets and demand clean unadulterated foods and clean air and water. Let's hope that we can reverse the trend for younger women to incur this dread disease, and develop less harmful treatments. Thank you, as I know your nieces thank you.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @SusanDeppner: Ah Susan, thanks for your lovely comment. I am pleased for your neighbor. May we all have our discoveries early on so they can be zapped or removed similarly, without need for assaulting treatments.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great story. Congratulations on getting LotD!

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 4 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Our next-door neighbor was diagnosed with breast cancer just recently and her surgery is scheduled for two days from now. This is a recurrence in the same spot after 14 years. Good news is that it was caught early and doesn't appear to have spread, so she shouldn't need chemo - or hats and scarves! Congratulations on your very positive, upbeat, cancer warrior-style Lens of the Day!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: So kind. Let's just spread the awareness that everyone, men and women too, get too much breast cancer, and perhaps we can make organic foods the deal-of-the-day for everyone so we face less challenges from pervasive chemicals.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @changrcoacher: I appreciate your kindness. I'm almost thinking that the PN is a thing of the past. I just made an update to my ReBuilder lens to share my success. Thank you for expressing such encouragement.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @AundreaG: wa alaikum assalam! Yes, and yes, in me it really affected my immune system in a hugely negative way, but it also killed the cancer. It has taken me years and dietary change to charge up my immune system, but I'm grateful to have found my chiropractor, who showed me the way. I pray that less drastic means of fighting the disease will be necessary in the future, partially because we will eat more healthily and exercise more, and also because some of those new tiny treatments will work more effectively.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Natural_Skin_Care: I'm glad you like them, and thanks. It's amazing how differently different fabrics feel on a bare scalp. Mine is more tender than most so I picked my favorites.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @EzLoanLookUp LM: Thanks. All these thoughtful comments make me feel so happy that I risked putting my baldness up for everyone to see.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @SteveKaye: You are so right, and our chances of getting breast cancer magnify as we age. I figure that if we cover up we may reduce some of those chances.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Susan Zutautas: I sure appreciate your comment, and yes, we are surely members of a huge group that may not have made it in our mothers' day.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @pawpaw911: Many thanks, there! It is truly a labor of love.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @writerkath: Kathy, I'm so glad to hear from you and thrilled about LOTD! It was freaky to discover a lump last month, and a relief that it disappeared. So many women experience that over and over again, even having repeated biopies, that I want to comfort whoever I can.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Diana Wenzel: What a beautiful expression of support!!! May your mom triumph, and it sounds like she is.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @getmoreinfo: Thank you sincerely. i am hoping that others will benefit from all the new developments in avoidance, detection and treatment. My hope is to provide hope for others so it's rewarding to know your opinion.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @jura: Maybe I should update this article to reflect the fact that I'm usually unaware of having had Peripheral Neuropathy anymore. It controlled my life for so many years after chemotherapy and I had been told that it would never get better. But diet and chiro treatment and then the ReBuilder and seldom do I even feel the slightest prickle in my feet. My hands are very well.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @darkflowers: It's rewarding to know that others find value here. Thanks.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @JaspinderKaur: Sharing is the best way to help. Now it's so easy to do on facebook, etc.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Diaper Bag Blog: i really wanted to be able to help, back in 2006 when I created this lens and even more so now that I learned about the side effect causes. Thank you.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @ruandeyu: That was really thoughtful of you.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @girlfriendfactory: That's a real demonstration of solidarity, isn't it!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Thank you. My treatment changed my life and caused horrible ramifications, and after 14 years I feel fortunate to have discovered some natural treatments to combat the chemical type from back then.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Very interesting lens thank you. And I would think it very helpful to nayone dignose with cancer, helpin them to feel more positive.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great work.

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      changrcoacher 4 years ago

      Thank you for sharing your journey. All the beautiful fashion that you discovered and share is a special gift. Also spreading the word about healthier eating. Good luck with your diet changes to make a difference in your PN. I send you healing thoughts.

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      AundreaG 4 years ago

      As-salamu Alaykum. Something that has always bugged me, is if chemotherapy does more harm than good. It seems to be the go-to method for the doctors, but doesn't it kill more than just the cancerous cells and lessen the immune system? Hopefully in the near future we will develop a method that is more efficient and safer in fighting cancer. Inshallah.

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      Natural_Skin_Care 4 years ago

      These scarves are gorgeous. Congratulations!

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      EzLoanLookUp LM 4 years ago

      What a wonderful lens. Thank you for this.

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      SteveKaye 4 years ago

      Wearing a hat is a good idea for everyone. Sun damage accumulates over time, which can result in skin cancer during a person's senior years.

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      Susan Zutautas 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Thank you for sharing your story. It's always an honor to meet another survivor.

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      pawpaw911 4 years ago

      Congratulations on LOTD well deserved.

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      writerkath 4 years ago

      Good morning Papier! What a smile it put on my face to see this chosen as LOTD. Congratulations! You did a wonderful job addressing a sensitive topic with your usual warmth and care. :) Kath

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      Renaissance Woman 4 years ago from Colorado

      Stopping back by to celebrate your life and today's honor (LOTD). Though my mother continues to fight a major battle with her cancers, she still has the same strength of spirit that exudes from you. Be well. Live strong!

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      getmoreinfo 4 years ago

      Congratulations on LOTD I really appreciate the value and experiences you shared, I know it will be an encouragement for both men and woman who may be facing a similar situation.

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      jura 4 years ago

      Great lens hope you will get better

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      Anja Toetenel 4 years ago from The Hague, the Netherlands

      I have a lot of respect for you, thank for sharing your story and the wraps of course. I wish you all the best!

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      JaspinderKaur 4 years ago

      it is such a great lens.

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      ruandeyu 4 years ago

      Such an amazing lens, just had to come back and give it some more love

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      Stanley Green 4 years ago from Czech Republic

      Touching lens. I love to read lenses which share personal stories. These have something more than other "standard lenses". Thank you for sharing your experience!

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      girlfriendfactory 4 years ago

      Thank you for sharing your story. A family we know was supportive by having everyone in the family shave their heads in support of the one daughter. It was so neat to see all of them bald while she went through chemo.

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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @EpicFarms: That is certain to be a long-lasting memory, to have your husband's caring assistance at a vulnerable time. Smart idea!

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      EpicFarms 4 years ago

      I had my husband shave my head for me; a pillow full of hair is excellent motivation. I found some cute colored baseball-style caps in different colors and had horses embroidered on the front to wear with scarves until my hair came back in. Nice lens!

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      socialcx1 4 years ago

      This is such a great lens and brings back great memories of a wonderful friend. Thanks

    • carol2 profile image

      carol2 4 years ago

      My son wore the same camouflage cap the first 18 months of chemo, all day, every day, until his hair grew back, then he switched to a Rush Limbaugh cap for going out of the house. Thank you for liking and commenting on my lens about James, Memorable Day.

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      Takkhis 4 years ago

      I just want to tell you that, I am happy to see you around here on Squidoo, take care always. However It is a very beautiful lens with important message! :)

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Dabdab: I sure appreciate your sharing this comment. It is a gift to other women who hesitate to think that having a nice cap or such could make a very big difference. Thank you, may you be blessed for being generous in sharin.

    • Dabdab profile image

      Dabdab 4 years ago

      I bought some of the cover-ups on this page for my mother-in-law when she was having chemo for breast cancer. She was a very proud and private woman, and the difference it made to have something to wear that looked like a fashion choice rather than an attempt to hide an illness was amazing. Unfortunately they caught the cancer too late and she passed away last christmas, but her quality of life was really very good right up until the last 3 weeks because she was able and confident enough to be up and about, even just for short periods of time.

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      Karen Kay 4 years ago from Jackson, MS

      Beautiful lens! Thanks so much for sharing your personal story and helping others behind you find comfort. I think scarves and hats are lovely and hope your lens makes it a little less intimidating for cancer patients. Who wants to wear a wig! Yuck! Celebrating beauty of the face with these lovely adornments is classy I say!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      nice lens

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      hmommers 4 years ago

      Tough to read this, but good of you to share and educate. Thanks.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @mattcut: Your comment couldn't be more touching. Your wife is fortunate to have such a caring spouse. The smoothies is definitely the way to go, and organic, if possible.

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      mattcut 4 years ago

      I am humbled by your lovely lens. Thank you for sharing this info. My heart goes out to the afflicted and my dear wife has been going through some stuff of her own which means I am going through it, because she is an angel in every sense of the word, my angel. I am going to start making green smoothies. Thank you dearly for creating this masterpiece

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Ibidii: ibidii,

      Thanks for the beautiful message. I now have new hair growing in, where my hair has been thinning for years. A year ago I began drinking green smoothies 3X each day. I wrote a blueberry smoothie lens and a couple others, but haven't done the hair regrowth one yet. Several months after beginning those green smoothies (all leafy greens and fruit only, no dairy) I noticed the first new growth around my hairline, tiny new hairs where none had grown for over a decade. Now I have my longer hair, which I generally straighten with my blowdryer brush, and a new crop of curly hair that is several inches long. Once the new hair gets longer I guess I'll need to trim the old. I'm delighted and making the smoothies is well worth the work. Since it worked for me after decades of gradually thinning hair, and a couple small bald spots, maybe it would be worth a try for you too.

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      Ibidii 4 years ago

      Awesome Lens Papier, I did not have breast cancer or any other cancer or any chemo or radiation. I did have an operation that left me damaged and I was in a chemical coma for 6 weeks. I had very long hair that I could almost sit on. It was in a ponytail. It rubbed a quarter size piece of my scalp raw. My hair needed to be cut. So they lopped off my hair at the base of the pony tail. The raw spot healed and I still have a dime size spot that has no hair. it took 3 years for my hair to grow back and it is only 1/6 th the thickness of what it was then. It is about 12 inches long now. I wore hats and scarves like you have here in you lens. Thank goodness for those things. My grandson has Alopecia from his syndrome. He has worn several wigs but all too hot for him. He wears hats all the time. He has maybe 100 hairs on his head. Thank goodness there are a lot of hats for both woman and men! Blessings to you dear. :)

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @squidoopets: That was a mighty neighborly thing to do today. Thanks.

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      Darcie French 4 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      Such an amazing lens, just had to come back and give it some more love

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      nick-gondoras 4 years ago

      Our radio group has a fundraising event event coming up called "Cure Kids Cancer". Great lense as a resource to help! Thank you!

    • nick-gondoras profile image

      nick-gondoras 4 years ago

      Our radio group has a fundraising event event coming up called "Cure Kids Cancer". Great lense as a resource to help! Thank you!

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      DivaChick LM 4 years ago

      love you lens many blessing to you :-D

    • Michey LM profile image

      Michey LM 4 years ago

      You have an incredible story to tell, and a great collection of wraps. Blessings! I wish you well!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Torrs13: I'm grateful for your comment. My help came from a lady at the hospital who ran the hat center for cancer patients. She was so gracious that I wanted to be able to give it back somehow.

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      Torrs13 4 years ago

      I think this lens is going to inspire a lot of people with cancer. You brought a lot of beauty to the matter by posting some beautiful scarves and hats for people to wear. Thank you for bringing hope!

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      Research_Analyst 4 years ago

      I like these fashionable scarves.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @favored: Your comments are much appreciated.

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      Fay Favored 4 years ago from USA

      You have overcome so many things in your life - and I want to keep reading. Words don't always say what you're feeling. I appreciate your boldness in sharing all you have been through in your lenses here on Squidoo.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @LynetteBell: Thanks. I appreciate the comment.

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      LynetteBell 4 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

      Great lens...thanks for sharing your journey

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It's so meaningful to read comments such as this.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Awesome lens and i loved to read every thing from the top of the page to the bottom.Good work.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @DeborahDian: Thank you so much. My experience was such a challenge that I wanted to use it to help others.

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      Deborah Carr 4 years ago from Orange County, California

      What a wonderful article. I have had several friends go through chemo, and your article will be a blessing to anyone else who goes through the same experience.

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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Craftypicks: That is truly amazing! She must have been both amazed and delighted.

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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Craftypicks: Thanks for your generosity.