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Compare eReaders: Kindle 3 vs NOOK vs NOOK Color vs Sony Reader vs Kobo eReader vs Kobo WiFi

Updated on July 8, 2011

E-book readers, simply known as "eReaders", are becoming very popular. E-book readers appeal to those that wish to consolidate all of the physical books into a single portable device. The idea is great. Thousands of books could be stored on these eReaders. If you have a full bookshelf, this may sound better by the moment. The main eReaders on the market today are Amazon's Kindle, Barnes & Noble's Nook, Sony's Reader, and the Kobo Reader. Each of these e-book readers attempt to offer you the best reading experience while also showcasing its own unique character. What are the benefits of buying an eReader? And what eReader is right for you? Let's compare them.


First, let's look at why you might want an eReader. E-book readers are like digital books. Unlike a computer, smart phone, or tablet, eReaders are not back-lit. This means they do not use powered LCD screens to display the text. How exactly does it work? 


Amazon's Kindle 3
Amazon's Kindle 3

Most e-book readers use a technology called E Ink. This electronic ink technology allows you to view text without a back-lit screen. E Ink has many advantages over LCD. For the application of reading long books and novels, LCD back-lit screens can strain the eyes. Much like real paper, E Ink puts very little strain on the eyes allowing you to read comfortably for hours. Most eReaders also credit the E Ink technology by boasting extremely low glare while using their devices. A positive side effect of this technology is the extended battery life. While most can run for about a week before charging, the Kindle 3 claims that it can go 1 full month before needing to be charged. When I think of the E Ink technology, the old solar powered classroom calculators always seem to come in mind.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
E Ink for a Kindle vs Pixel Qi (pronounce 'pixel chee')Hanvon's color e-ink display.
E Ink for a Kindle vs Pixel Qi (pronounce 'pixel chee')
E Ink for a Kindle vs Pixel Qi (pronounce 'pixel chee')
Hanvon's color e-ink display.
Hanvon's color e-ink display.

Besides, e-ink, a new technology is looking to be a promising alternative. It's called Pixel Qi. While the results look very similar to e-ink, Pixel Qi offers the same low glare, low eye stress viewing as e-ink, but with color capabilities. This technology looks great for e-magazines. 


Another color e-ink display is currently being developed. Made by Hanvon (a Chinese company), this new display is setting the pace for future color eReaders. Most manufacturers are aware of this technology but are waiting to see how if performs in China and possibly for the technology to mature. Expect future eReaders to use this or a competing technology for their color displays.


Amazon's Kindle 3

While we wait for technology to improve, let's take a look at Amazon's third generation eReader, the Kindle 3. Officially, it's simply called "Kindle" by Amazon. However, users, customers, and the mainstream recognize this device as the "Kindle 3". The Kindle 3 is smaller when compared to the Kindle 2. Amazon claims that the Kindle 3 has 50% improved contrast over the last model. This claim appears to be true. There are 2 version of the Kindle 3. One with only Wifi($139) and a more expensive version with Wifi and free 3G for life($189) supplied by Amazon's "Whispernet" data network. Like the previous Kindle, the Kindle 3 features a full qwerty keyboard and ambidextrous page turn buttons. The Kindle 3 weighs in at 8.7 oz and is light enough to hold in one hand comfortably. The experimental webkit browser is fair. You won't be surfing the web like a pro but it is nice to use in a pinch. The added addition of free Internet become a more apparent bargain if you decide to purchase the version with 3G. The Kindle 3 does play music with its mp3 player but don't expect this 4 GB eReader to replace your PMP or smart phone. A cool feature on Kindle is its text to speech software. This feature allows you to put on headphones and let Kindle read to you. While it is somewhat unnatural hearing a robotic voice read to you, it's a nice touch. This feature is only available on some e-books.


Amazon claims the Kindle 3 can go a full month without recharging but you have to turn off wifi and 3G. Expect it to last a week in real work conditions. The Kindle 3 is not perfect. Many people have been widely critical of Amazon with some of the design of the Kindle 2. The Kindle 3 was criticized for a lack of added memory slot, and no removable battery. In response, Amazon upgraded the Kindle 3 to 4 GB of internal memory from 2 GB. Still there is no memory slots for upgrading. Others have also complained about the battery. Like the Kindle 2, the Kindle 3 does not have a removable battery. After a long period of use, the battery tends to lose it's ability to hold a charge. In order to remedy this problem, you must send your Kindle back to Amazon and they will send you a new Kindle 3. While this allows you to get another Kindle faster, it is not the same device. This means you have to re-download your books from your Amazon account. It is much more convenient for the user to just buy a separate battery and replace it themselves. Even if Amazon pays for the shipping, it is still a hassle most people would rather do without.


The last issue with Kindle 3 is it closed nature. Epub is the new standard in e-books and Amazon have been very vocal that they will not support this format. If you are looking to buy an eReader is something to consider.


The Kindle 3 is the standard in eReaders. For that, the Kindle 3 is a "safe" buy. You should buy the Kindle 3 if you like the lists if Amazon books and periodicals. Personally, I would not recommend the Kindle 3. My friend purchased it and could not get his books loaded. The closed nature of Kindle 3 made it impossible for him to use it. Another thing to note is the lag. There is a noticeable lag when typing due to the e-ink display refreshing. If you plan to purchase lots of ebooks from Amazon, the Kindle 3 is a perfect choice.


Barnes & Noble's "NOOK"
Barnes & Noble's "NOOK"

Barnes & Noble's NOOK

The "NOOK" is Barnes & Noble's own take on eReaders. From a design standpoint, the NOOK is very different compared to the Kindle 3. The NOOK is an Android based eReader. Those familiar with Android can find a host of smart phones running this platform. The NOOK features a 6 inch E Ink display and a small color touchscreen under it. The touchscreen is used for primary input as there is no qwerty keypad. Like the Kindle 3, the NOOK comes in 2 different models. Barnes & Noble sells a wifi only model for $149 and a version which includes both wifi and 3G for $199. Right away, the NOOK picks up where the Kindle falls short. The NOOK has support for ePub as well as other DRM publishing formats. The NOOK also has a replaceable battery as well as a microSD expansion slot for added storage.


If you head down to Barnes & Noble, you can test out a working model yourself. The NOOK has received many complaints on its lag and deservingly so. The touch screen is unresponsive and the page flips take a good second longer than Kindle and Sony's Reader. In response, there have been a few firmware updates released which has helped improve the NOOK's performance. The touch screen is a bit more responsive and the page flip is just a split second slower than Kindle's since firmware updates.


A shining feature that separates NOOK from its competitors is its "Lend Me" feature. Like real books, you can lend some e-books to others providing they have the Barnes & Noble's reader application installed on their devices. The e-book also must have a special license in order to be shared. A compatible e-book can be shared for up to 2 weeks.


Update: Amazon has recently announce that the Kindle 3 will have this feature as well. Same exact thing. 2 weeks to 1 person only once. That's to other Kindle 3 owners.


Another neat easter egg for NOOK owners is exclusive access to specials when bringing your Nook into the Barnes & Noble book store. Nook detects when you are in a Barnes & Noble store and gives you access to select books for up to an hour. Come in and occasionally, you may even get a free book. This is really a cool feature that makes the NOOK a bit more exclusive.


The NOOK has its faults. Alongside the initial sluggish performance, people have criticized Nook for its Lend Me feature. While it is nice to share, you are only allowed to share a compatible book once and for a period of 2 weeks. During this period, you are not allowed access to the book. The case could be made that just like a real book, when you lend it to a friend, you can't access it either. I can understand that. I suppose when you purchase an e-book online, you pay for a single license so copying it is out of the picture. Its the one time lending policy that people are not happy about. You paid for the e-book so would it matter if you lend it to someone indefinitely? The 2 week expiration is understandable since friends often forget to return things, including real books. It's the one time lending rule that bugs me. I suppose its purpose is to entice friends to spend their own money on the lent e-book and the "lending" feature is just a fun spin off of the word "trial". Whatever the case may be, Barnes & Noble might have to change this policy in the future. A million people buying a million "leased" e-books could mean a big class action lawsuit.


The NOOK does feel nicer in the hand compared to the Kindle 3, although the touch screen seems a bit out of place. I like the curved back that hugs your hands. You can head to your local Barnes & Noble store for hands on impression. Frequent Barnes & Noble shoppers may be temped to choose the NOOK over other eReader. If not for the eReader itself, the exclusive perks are nice touches.

You should buy the NOOK if you are a frequent Barnes & Noble customer. The free perks are nice. I like how Barnes & Noble encourage NOOK owners to bring their NOOKs into the store. These free perks add value that other eReaders overlook. NOOK owners will look at the eReader as an investment rather than "the next" gadget.

NOOKcolor

The NOOKcolor
The NOOKcolor

Barnes & Noble's announced the Nook Color(offcially written NOOKcolor). This new eReader will have a 7" VividView color LED backlit screen powered by Android 2.1 and upgradeable to 2.2. This new eReader will sell for $249. and will be shipping November 19th, 2010. It will include a web browser, Pandora radio, WiFi and image support. There have been some concerns about the battery life. The NOOKcolor will have an internally sealed battery that will last 8 hours. This may be good for a portable netbook or tablet but for an eReader? Most dedicated eReaders lasts for weeks before needing to be plugged in. Barnes & Noble may have to market the NOOKcolor differently. I will say this. It does look nice.


One of the nice things about the NOOKcolor is periodicals. Barnes & Noble will feature popular magazines such as Elle, National Geographic, Rolling Stone, USA Today, Car And Driver, and more. Magazines are best viewed in color so they should focus on pushing as many magazines as they can when the 19th comes.


It seems that the NOOKcolor is geared more towards entertainment and media consumption. You can load in you mp3's or listen to Pandora Radio while you read. That's a cool feature. Social media is not left out of the picture. You can share reading materials through Facebook and Twitter with NOOKfriends.


Built in WiFi means internet access. It's browser allows you to surf the web but how good of an experience that will be is still unknown. If it runs Android 2.2, it should have some type of Flash support. like the original Nook, you can bring your NOOKcolor into Barnes & Noble and access all of NOOKbooks for free for up to 1 hour per day.


The NOOKcolor looks like it will be a hot gift this holiday season. Yes, it is priced high but as far as eReaders go, this device is at the top of its class. One of the big downsize is the battery life. If you are looking for an eReader designed for magazines, this is the clear choice. For long reading sessions, consider the Previous Nook and other eReaders listed here. Get the NOOKcolor if you are mainly going to subscribe to magazines. Although the list of magazines are growing, be sure to check their website for a complete list of current and upcoming magazines available.


Sony PRS-950 Daily Edition
Sony PRS-950 Daily Edition

Sony Reader

Sony is not new to the eReader game. Their Reader line is probably the most widely available. As generic as the name sounds, the quality of these readers are very high. You can find them in nearly all department stores and electronics retailers. I've seen them in Radioshack, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, and even Borders. Their current line includes the PSR-350 "Pocket Edition", PSR-650 "Touch Edition", and PSR-950 "Daily Edition". The Pocket Edition retails for $179, the Touch goes for $299, and the Daily Edition sells for $237. The Reader Pocket Edition is the new entry level eReader offered by Sony. For the sake of this comparison, we will be looking at the Touch and Daily Edition. Like the name implies, the Touch and its older brother the Daily Edition are both touch screen eReaders. The Touch is slightly smaller than the Daily and 6" and 7" respectively. While the Touch offers 8 levels of greyscale, the Daily doubles its little brother at 16. The Reader Touch Edition does not offer wifi nor 3G. In order to get books with the Reader Touch, you must have it transferred through USB. The Reader Daily Edition, on the other hand, offer free 3G through AT&T Mobility, though wifi is not present. The Touch has an internally sealed battery while the Daily has a removable battery. Both devices claim up to 2 weeks of reading on a single charge with the 3G connection turned off on the Daily Edition. Both devices have memory stick pro DUO and SDHC expansion slots.


TIP:

Although most Sony Readers look strikingly similar, you can tell the difference between the old and the new version but the home button. The older Sony Readers have all rectangular buttons. The newer Sony Readers all have a "half mooned" curved home button. Look at the picture on the right for an example!


These Sony Reader devices have a thin layer of touch screen that overlays the E Ink Pearl screen. While not as quick as smart phones and tablets, the touch screen is fairly responsive and do well as an input method. The Touch and Daily edition support gestures which allows you to swipe the screen if you want to turn the page. The page turns very quickly with the new generation of Sony Readers.
 

Out of all the eReaders, the Reader Daily edition out ranks the competition with its dictionary and note taking. For example, if you are in the middle of reading a book and come across a word you don't understand, you can touch the word with your finger or stylus and the dictionary will pop up. With the Kindle 3 for example, you would have to use the D-pad to navigate to the word and then click on it. Note taking is also fairly easy with the Daily Edition. If you want to take a make an annotation, the Daily makes an overlay layer over the page so you can use the stylus and draw underlines and notes over it.


The Reader Daily Edition is not perfect. The most critical flaw of the Touch and Daily Edition is the glare. E-book readers appeal to the consumer because of their E Ink displays. The glare seen on the Daily Edition is caused by the thin touch screen layer. I found the glare to be marginal to even complain about. Yes, there is glare but it is not intolerable. Fortunately, the older Daily Edition and Touch Edition are on display at Best Buy for you to try out and decide if that's an issue. Newer PRS-950 Daily Editions will be slimmer and feature a sharper display.

Another feature criticized on the Daily Edition is their 3G. Unlike Kindle 3, the AT&T Mobility network only allows Daily Edition access to the Sony Reader store. Sony has added a browser for the Daily Edition but it will only work over wifi.


The Daily Edition feels good in the hand and is easy to use. Despite its flaws, Sony received praise for opening its products. Learning from past mistakes of using proprietary formats (ATRAC, memory stick pro DUO), Sony has opened up their Reader line in favor of more open formats like microSD and ePub. Standardized connections such as microUSB are also welcomed changes from the company's past. It is also worth mentioning that the new line of Sony eReaders will all have a full touch screen. The selling feature of the Daily Edition is the ability to download and view newspapers right on the device. Some newspapers are formatted much like a modern HTML page where headlines are clickable, sending you straight to the article. This feature is great. Adding the support of subscribing to a publication and you will find the newspaper or magazine delivered straight to your Daily Edition much like subscriptions are delivered to your mailbox.


The drawback to the Sony Reader eReaders is the price. Starting at $179, this is considerably more expensive compare to the wifi Nook and Kindle 3. The top of the line Sony Reader Daily Edition is suggested to retail at $299. As it appears, the Reader Daily Edition is MSRP $100 over the Kindle 3 and Nook. Another drawback is their smaller store compared to Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Their newspaper and magazine list is also small, currently only having one computer related magazine available for subscription. On the newspaper side, you can find the Wall Street Journal, LA Times and various other business oriented periodicals available for purchase. Sony needs to build their Reader store if they want to take advantage of the Daily Edition's strongest feature and possibly, appeal to a wider audience.


Although it seems like there are lots of negatives with the Sony eReader, I personally like it. The touch screen is very responsive. Turning pages is fast for this e-ink display. It also feels much more natural to swipe the pages rather than pressing a button. You don't need to exaggerate either. A short swipe is all it takes to initiate page turning. The Daily Edition has a great 2 page landscape view. After using it for a while, I found it to be much more enjoyable than I had expected. I found the 2 page landscape mode extremely fast for reading. I was able to fly through each line of text. I was also able to keep my place easier in the mode. I didn't think I would like it that much. For this feature, I would recommend the Daily Edition if you are a volume reader. If you need to read lots of text for an extended period of time, the Daily Edition is what you need. This would be perfect for people that want to finish newpapers very quickly. Currently, this 2 page landscape more is only available on the Daily Edition. The other Sony eReaders do not feature this.


Kobo eReader

The Kobo eReader is last on our list of e-book readers. Selling at Borders for $99, Kobo eReader is also the cheapest of the bunch. Kobo eReader features a 6" E Ink display and weighs in at a light 8 onces. With 1 GB of internal storage and upgradeable SD expansion slot, it beats Kindle 3 in terms of potential storage. As far as features, Kobo eReader is the purest of all our eReaders with support for ePub, PDF, and Adobe DRM. Lacking both wifi and 3G, you must connect with USB or Bluetooth(to select smart phones). Also a generation behind it competitors, Kobo eReader only supports 8 shades of greyscale while others support 16.


Kobo eReader
Kobo eReader

As far as looks go, the Kobo looks like plain Jane. Definitely not as sexy as the Sony Daily Edition, Kobo eReader aims for the minimal approach in its design. The front face features a "Home", "Menu", "Display", "Back'", and a 4 way D-pad. On the back of Kobo, you will find a rubberized "quilted" material that makes holding onto Kobo comfortable, even if it looks a bit tacky.


For an eReader the Kobo does the job fine. It's not the top of the line eReader but it gets the job done. It comes pre-loaded with 100 classic books so you can start reading right away. Even though it's the cheapest eReader out of the bunch we've looked at, it doesn't feel like it has the most value. For $10 more, you could get a Kindle 3 wifi and have more features. As it stands, the Kobo eReader needs to be $100 if it wants to compete with the other eReaders.


Update: Borders has dropped the non-WiFi Kobo eReader to $99! Maybe they have been reading this hub.


You should buy the Kobo eReader if you don't want to spend over $99. Although it does not have many features, it can perform the task without serious issues.


New Kobo WiFi in black.
New Kobo WiFi in black.

Updated: Kobo WiFi $139!

Apparently listening to its customers, Borders and Kobo are releasing a newer version of the Kobo eReader equipped with wifi and other internal upgrades. It will have a faster processor, a better screen, and longer battery life. The screen is not the new Pearl Ink display available on the new Kindle 3 and Sony Readers but it is improved. The faster processor will allow Kobo to turn pages over 2.5X faster than the original and the battery life will equate to 10,000 page turns with wifi turned off. The new Kobo will be available in 3 colors: black, silver, and lavender.


This has been an interesting move from Kobo. Kobo will also include apps for the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Tab and recently announced BlackBerry Playbook. Reading books have always been somewhat of a personal experience. Kobo intends to change that with the launch of their new social reading app for the BlackBerry. With this app, users will be able to chat, ask questions, share recommendations, and go public with your books. You can see what books your friends are currently reading and even read passages together. It's interesting to see the reviews of this new "social reading" app. I credit Kobo for trying something new and trying to bring back book clubs. Interestingly enough, the Kobo WiFi actually feels lighter than the original Kobo. I'm not sure if this is a good thing or not. It definitely looks better in black but the lighter weight makes it feel a bit cheaper. The new Kobo WiFi will cost $139 and will be available at the end of October. Expect the original Kobo to drop in price.


If you like the feel of the Kobo eReader, the Kobo WiFi is the natural upgrade. As far as features, there are better options. However, the quilted rubberized backing has a certain charm that can be described as "cute". It is a lovely device. Personally, I don't like the fact that it is lighter than the original but this is a quality for those who value portability. The Kobo and Kobo WiFi comes preloaded with 100 ebooks. That's a nice freebie!


Final Thoughts

EReaders are growing in popularity. Following the currently trends, expect more and more publishers to support the market. It would be excellent for students in high school and college. Imagine buying all of your e-books online and replacing 35 lbs of textbooks with an 8 once eReader. Shopping around for a good eReader will be top priority this holiday season. Thanks for reading this comparison!


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    • profile image

      alian 5 years ago

      kindly advice me , I'm almost will buy an e-reader device for reading my pdf's files and books .

      which of them will give me the better experience

    • profile image

      compareboy 5 years ago

      Fantastic information! I was thinking about getting one, maybe it's not just a bad idea... Thx!

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 5 years ago

      Rickcx, thanks for the comment. I already use Calibre! It's a great tool. I run Kubuntu so I'm a big supporter of open-source programs.

    • profile image

      rickcx 5 years ago

      One thing you (and your readers) should look into is a free library management tool called Calibre (www.calibre-ebook.com). Its free and opensource. It will convert PDF's and (depending on DRM rights) convert any file type to your ereader default type. It also has a search feature built in, that scrubs the web for any book you search for, and it shows you the DRM rights BEFORE you buy. Check it out, it will add just a bit more to any ereader...

      rickCx of http://www.aheadofthebuck.com

    • profile image

      Ajeethaa 6 years ago

      Hi Adroit,

      I am a postgrad student and do read alot of articles in PDF format. I would like to get an e-reader but unsure which one i should i get. I am looking for one where i could highlight, write notes and bookmark pages. Of course I would be using one to read books and magazines.

      Thanks.

    • jpcmc profile image

      JP Carlos 6 years ago from Quezon CIty, Phlippines

      What a thorough comparison of e-reader products! It pays to know the products before buying. Many people simply buy b3cause of peer pressure or even the allure of ads. An informed buyer is always best.

      This definitely requires a Vote up. I'll be sharing this with other people interested in e-readers. Thanks for the info.

    • profile image

      afsnowangel 6 years ago

      I have a Sony Reader, and have loved it for the past several years. My daughter just got a Nook for her birthday a couple weeks ago, and while it suits her needs just fine, I am more impressed with my 3 year old Sony than with her latest and greatest Nook. It is time for me to upgrade my eReader pretty soon, and based on everything I've read here, and my own personal experience, I will be buying another Sony. Thank you for all your information and insight!

    • profile image

      EasyReader 6 years ago

      Received the NookColor for Christmas and LOVE it! I have arthritis, and find it not as painful to hold as a book. Glare is not a problem. Love the fact that the brightness is adjustable. Very easy to turn pages with quick finger or thumb flip. My only complaint is short battery life.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      On some Kindle books, it is able to "read" to you. I have tried it and although it works, it is not ideal. The voice is very robotic. Think Microsoft Sam-ish voice. This feature is not available to all books and is more of a gimmick.

      Long answer short, no. The kindle 3 "can" but only on some books and it is robotic. Pronunciation will not be accurate.

    • profile image

      rob 6 years ago

      Can any of the ereaders pronouce individual words for beginning readers? For instance, if you come go a word you don't know, you can click on it and hear that word pronounced (beginning readers won't be able to decipher a dictionary's pronunciation key).

    • profile image

      Fcp 6 years ago

      My library doesn't support Kindle and nook has been great for reading and plenty of free books too

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      gayle, that have been mentioned many times on the comments.

    • profile image

      gayle 6 years ago

      You forgot to mention the ability to borrow ebooks from the library on the ereaders that allow the drm protected ebooks.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      There's lots of PDF info in the comments. Yes, PDF support sucks but not because the devices suck. But because the PDF format suck. Lots of PDF do not alloow formatting which means texts stay the same size. This requires lots of zooming in and panning. ePub is much better because it allows for word wrapping.

    • profile image

      Jacob 6 years ago

      You dont say anything about PDF support. PDF support sucks on all of these. Some are better than others. Since people have so many PDFs, they need to be aware and not assume that these will work good just because PDFs are popular.

    • profile image

      michael mmmmmmm 6 years ago

      Okay guys, is no one interested in availability of books? Nook and nookcolor have over two million titles available and over half are free! The main concern for ereaders should be can i find the books i want? Amazon advertises 775,000 total books available. They have even had issues with selling books they dont have rights to. Amazon releases a new kindle every few months. Nook and nookcolor get free wireless software updates from android. Add to that the fact that there are barnes & noble stores for help and free reading and its clear that nook and nookcolor have the best value for your money.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      My vision is fine kabel,

      Perhaps you need to check yours. The first link you posted, there is glare on the top left corner of the second picture.

      In the video at the bottom, as Lisa, from mobile tech review, moves the PRS-950, you can see glare from the lights as she moves the eReader. This is especially true at the 3:15 mark.

      You can show me all the "facts" you want. Even your own sources prove you wrong.

      I can erase your post if I want. I've given you a chance and as far as I'm concerned, the issue is closed. Don't spam my page any more.

    • profile image

      kabel 6 years ago

      @ Adroit Alien: I do not need to go at some store to see if there is a glare issue with prs-950, i own one. It is obvious that your technical skills are lacking. Another thing that you are lacking is good vision. I just do not know where you see glare at prs-950, or prs-650, or prs-350. So to make the things clear, i personally own prs-950 and prs-600; my wife owns nook, and my brother has kindle 3. When I place all four of them together, from the glare perspective, kindle 3 is the worst; but that is not making it bad reader. So, you can call me biased now, and I can call you bad informer because you say “go see prs-900 if glare is your concern, because prs-900 and prs-950 act the same from glare point of view”. Not true.

      I will point out to some web pages so you can read that i’m not the only one with good vision and good technical knowledge; but i’m not going to quote the sentences where the authors are informing their readers properly, you have to find them your self; you may enjoy the reading and learn something.

      http://www.mobiletechreview.com/gadgets/Sony-Reade...

      http://reviews.cnet.com/e-book-readers/sony-reader...

      http://www.the-ebook-reader.com/sony-prs-950.html

      At the end, i can lecture you all i want, it is up to you to accept my facts (lecture) or not.

      Do not you dare to erase my post.

    • profile image

      JIM 6 years ago

      Received my Nook for Christmas and I love it. One thing not mentioned in the review is that you can take books out of the local library with the Nook. This is a real plus. The books are your's free for three weeks.

      As mentioned the "in store" features are another advantage for the Nook as well as "Free Fridays" when a ebook is offered for free.

      For me the Nook is the best choice.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Kabel, what are you talking about? Go to a Best Buy and pick up the newer Sony Readers. There is definitely glare(albeit low) on those devices. And yes, they are noticeable compared to the Kindle and Nook.

      What doesn't make sense is your bias towards Sony. In fact, I gave the Sony Readers very, VERY high praise and I even own one. I purchased one over all the eReaders. Don't lecture me about misinforming people. While you crawl the Internet in defense of Sony, I'm already looking into the Color E-Ink technologies. My goal of this hub is not technical. It's informative. If there is glare, I will say it despite what the spec sheets say. That, my friend is called informing people.

    • profile image

      kabel 6 years ago

      "The Reader Daily Edition is not perfect. The most critical flaw of the Touch and Daily Edition is the glare. E-book readers appeal to the consumer because of their E Ink displays. The glare seen on the Daily Edition is caused by the thin touch screen layer. I found the glare to be marginal to even complain about. Yes, there is glare but it is not intolerable. Fortunately, the older Daily Edition and Touch Edition are on display at Best Buy for you to try out and decide if that's an issue."

      All new Sony eBook readers are using the infrared touchscreen technology for capturing the interaction with the user. In other words, the glare is not an issue anymore; no more resistive touchscreen layer that creates glare. So, how they can judge new technology by looking at the old one? It does not make any sense, you are misinforming the people.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Praedor, many people have the same problem with the NOOKcolor. It's good for what it is, but a real eReader will be enjoyed for hours on end.

      LCD screens are harsh but a new line of color e-ink displays are emerging. Let's hope we see them soon.

    • profile image

      Praedor 6 years ago

      I received a Nook Color for Xmas. I intend to take it back and get the regular (B&W) e-ink version of the Nook. The color LCD screen is very nice and all but it is LCD. Hard on the eyes, particularly in the dark (I cannot tell you how much I hate reading for any real length of time from my LCD computer screen - the smaller size and smaller pixels matter not a bit. LCD is LCD). The color nook screen is as invisible in direct sunlight as a cell phone screen and the battery life is very poor (8 hours is awful) and this means a very short battery life - like a laptop's).

      I've resisted ebooks/e-readers up to now because nothing matches the quality/value of a printed book (and a book is just as readable 200 yrs from now as it is when printed - not a single digital/electronic format will live longer than anyone reading this). However, I see a value to using one of these things for carrying lots of books to read on a vacation/extended trip. So...the regular Nook with wifi is what I'll be trading in for and handing the purchaser a nice $100 return on the deal.

    • profile image

      George 6 years ago

      Thanks for the great research. I just purchased a Nook and am 100% satisfied. With the "lend me" feature and ability to check out books from the local library, it was a no brainer. The Nook is an excellent e-reader!!

    • Kyrien profile image

      Kyrien 6 years ago

      Thanks for narrowing that down for me Adroit. I'm actually going to visit B&N tomorrow to buy it. I'm also going to pick up a nicely priced cover and a reading light for it. Thanks again.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Sorry Joker, the NOOKcolor uses an LCD screen which is much different than e-ink. There is color e-ink coming in the future but not any time soon. I wrote a hub about it and the link is above.

      Don't let these salepeople bully you into getting an item you don't want. I used to be in retail and I always let customers have their space. Hopefully, you get to meet a more competent salesperson.

    • profile image

      Joker 6 years ago

      I'm in the market...thanks for the review.....

      I just tried out the Nook and Nook Color....The most important feature to me is Epub works with my library, I can get any book for free at the library, just like I do with hard copy books....(The Kindle is out, since it cannot do this)

      The sales person at B&N really was pushing the color nook over the nook....but I really like the Eink page view....Too bad the Color Nook with all it's cool features (tablet like) can't use the Eink....

      I wonder if a software upgrade to Android 2.2 will include an option for Eink in the Color Nook???? (perhaps you have some insight, if the Color Nook could go to Eink with a software update only, or that'll be next generation)

      It appeared that the page view on the Color Nook would be acceptable, but the Nook's Eink is really sharp....

      I'm on the fence.....going to go in to a different B&N today, hopefully the salesperson doesn't lead me towards the Color Nook so quickly....

    • Adroit Alien profile image
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      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      eBook vary from $.99 to $13. These prices are pretty competitive between the Barnes & Noble's and Amazon store. Generally, an ebook is sold at $9.99. They are usually discounted 40%-50% from the paper counterpart.

    • profile image

      Allison 6 years ago

      One of the things I am curious about is the cost for the books themselves. Is it relatively similar, or is there a significant difference between the various formats? There's no point, for me, in saving money initially if it means I will end up spending more in the long-run.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
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      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      kyrien,

      If you want to be able to download from anywhere, you're stuck with the 3G Kindle, NOOK, and NOOKcolor. The rest do not offer 3G. I strongly suggest you consider the others which are wifi. Wifi in an urban area is practically everywhere and you have to realize how often you need 3G to download books.

      - if you want low glare, scratch the Sony off your list. They have a touch screen and it offers some glare. All of the rest are better, in terms of glare.

      - All of the eReaders excluding the NOOKcolor have excellent battery life. We're talking weeks between charges.

      - Scratch the Kindle as it has neither upgradeable memory nor replaceable battery. The Kobo(wifi) also does not have replaceable battery. You're left with the Nook(s)

      - preventing double downloads means having an online library. You would have to have some type of "account" which the Kindle and Nook offer.

      So if these are your absolute must have criteria, I suggest the NOOK (not NOOKcolor). It fills all of your requirements.

    • Kyrien profile image

      Kyrien 6 years ago

      Hi Adroit, let me first mention that your hub is very informative, and just what I have been looking for these past few weeks for information on e-readers. Anyway, for Christmas I was planning on getting a few books, seeing as I can't afford to buy one everytime I finish another, but my mother was the one who mentioned that I should opt for an e-reader instead, so I've been researching and have been set on a Kindle 3, but after reading this, I'm not sure. I would like your opinion on which type would suit me. This is what I would like it to have:

      -The ability to download from anywhere(doesn't have to include both Amazon and B&N, so one is fine as long as everywhere else is included)

      -Low glare

      -Good battery life so that I dont have to worry too much about charging

      -upgradeable memory and replacable battery

      -something to prevent double downloads when it comes to a book.

    • profile image

      savvygranny 6 years ago

      great article! very informative. Thanks.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
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      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      An average ebook will be around 2 MB but the size will vary depending on length and pictures. It is my understanding that you have a 5 GB bandwidth limit and you currently use 3 GB. That means you have 2 GB free for ebook downloads. If each ebook is 2 MB, you can download about 1,000 ebooks a month. That should be enough even if your ebooks are 4 MB. 500 ebooks a month is a lot to download.

      If you do not want to babysit your bandwidth, get the pay a little extra for the 3G kindle. You get free 3G for life(advertised).

    • profile image

      savvygranny 6 years ago

      We have almost decided on the Kindle 3, but I have a question I have not seen addressed, if you could give us your opinion, please. Currently, I can only download 5 GB on my wifi for the price I pay monthly. Anything over that is very expensive. I realize every book can be different, but is there an average MB per book I could try to figure out how many books a month would put me over my limit? We are using about 3 GB a month now.

      I was thinking that rather than worry about going over my 5 GB limit, for $50 extra for the 3G Kindle, I could download the books on the 3G instead of my wifi. What do you think of this idea?

      This is a very informative hub and my husband and I really appreciate all the info you have provided.

    • profile image

      David 6 years ago

      One point regardind the PDF format. I have used the sony, kindle and Nook for some time and the only one wich reads pdf properly is the nook, the other two make some weird remapping and it's not easy to read pdf in them.

      There are programs out there to convert pdf to their native formats, but if you need to read a lot of pdf documents for work on the go and don't want to print all of them the nook is a good solution.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
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      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Sorry Andrea. You cannot read Amazon ebooks on the Nook. The opposite is also true. You can't read Barnes & Noble's ebooks on Kindles.

    • profile image

      Andrea 6 years ago

      Im leaning towards the Nook color because it is more compatible with other types of files. Does that mean it would also use the ebooks from amazon?

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Lauretta, Yes you can buy Kindles from Amazon.

      @ Lender, thanks! The iPad is a nice device. I choose not to compare them because the iPad is a completely different device.

      @ Unsure, The NOOKcolor is a bit sluggish. It feels exactly like an underpowered tablet. While the battery on the NOOKcolor lasts hours, the battery on the Kindle and tradition eReaders lasts weeks. Page turning varies on each device but they usually are a second or less. I'm not sure what you mean by downloading. They should download books at the same speed if they have wifi. Of course 3G will be a bit slower. Being classified by me as a small tablet, the NOOKcolor should have more options but I feel if you want to buy a swiss army knife, get the iPad, Galaxy Tab, or wait for the PlayBook. The Nookcolor is too slow to compete with real tablets, and too awkward to compete as an eReader.

    • lender3212000 profile image

      lender3212000 6 years ago from Beverly Hills, CA

      Outstanding hub! I did one comparing the Kindle to the iPad but it's nice to see some of the newer eReaders making it into the discussion. Sometimes it is easy to look beyond the smaller players in the market even though they may have decent products.

    • Lauretta123 profile image

      Lauretta123 6 years ago from Ukr

      Can I buy it from Amazon?

    • profile image

      Unsure 6 years ago

      Not sure which one is best for me, I keep going back and forth between the kindle 3 or the nook color. I like them both but just not sure on which one to get. I kept hearing that the nook color is sluggish and the battery life is not that long vs the kindle 3 whose battery life is long. Which one has a longer battery life and also which one is faster with turning pages and downloading.Also which one has more options as far as internet, games, and then also adjusting font and other formats for reading. Pleae help.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      @ samii,

      Don't get him a NOOKcolor. It will be a hassle for him. Color is nice for magazines but I'm assuming you want to buy him ebooks for English literature, not for magazines. He will have a better time with an open eReader platform. Make sure if you buy the Kindle that his books are available in the Amazon store. If not, get the Sony Reader or the Kobo. They are very open to all popular formats.

    • profile image

      samii 6 years ago

      hi i am looking to buy one of these ereaders for my bf. It will mainly for his school books so that he doesnt have to buy so many and need a place to put them all. I still dont know which one to buy. nookcolor seams cool with the music and internet but everyone is saying that kinle is better. help

    • giwrgos12 profile image

      giwrgos12 6 years ago from San Diego

      Hi, Very informative post ! I really appreciate all the efforts that you put into writing this post . Keep posting…

    • profile image

      Christina 6 years ago

      Andriot,

      Thanks so much for your opinion and information :) After doing tones of research today (coming back here many times) I think I am leaning towards the Kobo wireless. I just want something simple, and this seems to be the one to get the job done.

      Thanks again!

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Roo, for your son, I'd suggest the Kobo.

      Christina, Since I already own a Sony Reader Daily Edition, I am a bit bias. I suppose if I was using my eReader just for library books, I would've bought a Kobo. They are cheap and they get the job done. Would I trade my Sony Reader for a Kobo? Probably not. eReaders are somewhat of a personal choice. I suggest holding each and trying them for yourself before making a decision. Most electronic retailers have working models in store that you can hold and get a feel for.

      If purchasing books is out of the question, stay clear of the Kindle and Nook. They heavily promote buying books from their store.You can't go wrong with a Kobo or Sony Reader.

      Do note that reading ebooks in PDF format is not ideal. PDF was the previous standard and they render like images. If you want to read a pdf, you will have a chore zooming in and panning left and right. ePub allows you to format the text size and it will wrap nicely on screen. Just a little tidbit. If you have a choice, get ePubs over PDFs.

    • profile image

      Christina 6 years ago

      @Adriot Alien, yes my State does ePub and Adobe PDF for ebooks.

      I'm not really into purchasing books when I can borrow them from the library and being a busy Mom it would be awesome to be able to download right from the library to an eReader.

      Anyway, what would be your first choice if you were using it for ePub alone?

      Thanks!

    • profile image

      Roo 6 years ago

      I own the Kindle 3. Looking to purchase an eReader for my 14 year old son - an avid reader. He loves books from the library...I can purchase books but balk at paying $10 a book for an avid reader. Do I get Nook, Nookcolor or Sony eReader etc???? Something else?

    • profile image

      MemyselfandI 6 years ago

      People keep commenting on the Barnes and Noble's ebook selection not being as large as Kindles. Keep in mind that with the Nook, you can download books from anywhere (but Kindle, and Kindle can only download from Kindle), any other ebook site, store, library, etc. The Kindle is very limited in that respect.

    • theelhub profile image

      theelhub 6 years ago from UK

      interesting. Dont like the look of Nook color

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      @Christina, If the ebook is in ePub format, then yes. The Sony Reader will work fine with that. Most libraries use ePubs so that shouldn't be a problem.

    • profile image

      Christina 6 years ago

      I'm only looking to download books from my public library, so would a Sony Reader be best for me? I really don't need to do anything else but read on it :)

      Thanks!

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Great point BlackMiracle!

      Sorry, I am from the US and I didn't take any consideration to those living in other countries. Thank you for pointing that out. Clearly, the NOOK is a poor choice for non-US readers.

    • profile image

      BlackMiracle 6 years ago

      Great review. But you didn't mention that NOOK has no support outside US but Kindle. I see all NOOKBook are available only in the US, also the device is shipped only in the US. A lot of people outside US want to read magazines, books that is not available in their country. I don't know what is the situation like for Sony and the other eReader, but Kindle beats NOOK definitely on this issue.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      The true color eReaders are not going to come out for at least another 6 months. If you are not a magazine person, I suggest a standard e-ink reader, the NOOK. If you want something w/ internet and games, the best option is an iPad or the Samsung Galaxy Tab, but those are quite a bit more expensive.

      For what it's worth, there will always be something better coming out. That's just the way technology works. I enjoyed my Sony Reader for a year before I sold it on craigslist for a newer Daily Edition. You said you are a huge bookworm. I suggest buying a standard eReader(NOOK). It will be more enjoyable reading for hours on end.

    • profile image

      qgarv 6 years ago

      I have been looking at ereaders for a while and after hours of research narrowed it down to getting the nook or nook color. Now though, after hearing about the color ereaders that may be coming out, i'm torn. I don't want to buy something if something better is coming. I'm not really a magazine person, just a huge bookworm. Internet and games would be nice though. Should i wait in your opinion, or should i get a nook or nook color?

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Jbird, it's true. Amazon's ebook store is much larger than Barnes & Noble's NOOK store. You can listen to mp3's on the the Nook, Nook Color, Sony Reader Touch, Sony Reader Daily Edition, and Kindle 3.

      All of the eReaders have upgradeable sd/micro sd storage slots EXCEPT for the Kindle 3 and the Sony Pocket Reader. The Sony Reader Touch and Daily Edition however, does have upgradeable memory. If this is a major concern, consider crossing the Kindle 3 from your list. Even the Kobo eReader has an upgrade SD memory slot.

    • profile image

      Jbird 6 years ago

      I just became interested in getting an e-reader. This is a tough decision as there are things about each (Kobo, Kindle, Sony) that are attractive. I want access to the largest library possible. I like to read new books and some older ones as well. I've heard a con in the Nook "camp" that their library wasn't as extensive. One feature I found a bit appealing is the ability to listen to music. Is that a feature that can be utilized as I read a book? If so, is there an e-reader that is built more for that sort of thing? I know that the native memory provides for a large library, but I do like the option of adding more memory to expand my library. Which e-reader(s) are best for that as well?

      Thanks Adroit for all your research :)

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      @cassie, if you want a pure dedicated eReader, I suggest the Nook over the NOOKcolor. The glare and the LCD screen can strain your eyes after a few short hours. If color is a must have, I suggest waiting a 6 months to a year for the crop of color eReaders heading to hit the market.

    • pisethz profile image

      pisethz 6 years ago

      Kobo eReader look cool to me. I like this one

    • Trinsick profile image

      Trinsick 6 years ago from Cali

      I'm leaning towards the Sony reader. My dad has the Kindle 2 and it's solid as well.

    • dgicre profile image

      dgicre 6 years ago from USA

      Great and very informative hub. Thought about getting a Kindle and ended up with an iPad. The Kindle is tops in it's field at the moment as an eReader though. Voting Up!

    • AaronAdamic profile image

      AaronAdamic 6 years ago from New York

      I haven't known anything about e-reader gadgets but I learnt a lot from your review. Thanks a lot!

    • nuwy profile image

      nuwy 6 years ago from Indonesia

      thanks for your review...I get brighter than before!!!

    • profile image

      KLeichester 6 years ago

      Thank you for this post. It's a good comparative read. I like it.

    • danielpolly profile image

      danielpolly 6 years ago from New York

      Yea, I also prefer the Kindle :) Your reviews are awesome!

    • profile image

      Scrub 6 years ago

      This is a terrific hub. Thank-you so much!

    • profile image

      cassie 6 years ago

      I dont know if i should get the Nook or Nook color? i would like to get on the internet, and i of course want it to read alot of books and i hear the Nook color has a glare kind of when your outside. I like the way you can listen to music on the Nook Color, but i am still not sure. Nook or Nook color, what do you suggest?

    • SUSIE405 profile image

      SUSIE405 6 years ago from Delray Beach, Florida

      I have been researching ereaders for a while, and it looks like if I want it mostly for reading books , the Kindle is the right one for me.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Mountainhealer,

      ePub is the standard in ebook formats. Much like mp3 is to music or jpg/png is to images. You wouldn't buy a portable music player that can't play mp3 so would you buy an eReader that can't read ePub? The previous standard was pdf but pdf renders much like an image. Texts cannot be formatted (made bigger or smaller) in pdf.

      @smilingman. Interestingly enough, the regular Kobo and Kobo wifi are advertised as the same weight. 221 grams or just under 8 oz. In the hand, they do feel different.

    • The Smiling Man profile image

      The Smiling Man 6 years ago from USA

      How much lighter is the Wifi kobo?

    • profile image

      mountainhealer 6 years ago

      Thank you so much for your reviews. It has helped me to clarify the differences between the e-readers. So far, I am leaning toward purchasing the Kindle 3 for a friend who is an avid reader. However, I don't know what e-pub is. (Sorry, but I am from the older generation:) Would you tell me what it is? In the end, that may be the determining factor for deciding which e-reader to purchase.

      Thanks for the excellent review. You brought me, a dinosaur with these things, into the 21st century!

    • profile image

      dream on 6 years ago

      What great information.Still searching for the best deal!Thank you do much.

    • Randy Kadish profile image

      Randy Kadish 6 years ago

      I guess for me I wanted to take ebooks out of the public library so I decided not to buy a Kindle. I went for the Sony Pocket Reader because it's so light. To me, downloading books from my computer is no big deal, but there's not question that Amazon has the largest selection of ebook. I guess that's why some people have two ereaders.

    • willjackson profile image

      willjackson 6 years ago from New York

      nice post you have a comparison on which device would work best for you

    • TroyM profile image

      TroyM 6 years ago

      THanks for the time you took for this research and for posting about it. I've checked out the Kindle, but that's it so far. Interested in something for a holiday gift.

      Thanks!

    • ericfrusy profile image

      ericfrusy 6 years ago from New York

      Excellent reviews! Helped a lot :)

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      improved protection of piracy was not the purpose of the Kindle 3, but a side effect. My friend returned his Kindle because he could not get library ebooks loaded. I agree with you about the NOOKcolor. It's a nice device but it feels like a stepping stone to a full tablet. An iPad, Galaxy Tab, or BlackBerry PlayBook is more my style albeit more expensive.

    • Magdelene profile image

      Magdelene 6 years ago from Okotoks

      Kindle all the way, I have one, love it. Looked at the others except for the Nookcolor, it looks nice but if I'm going to go color I think I would just get an Ipad or the latest smaller version that they may or may not come out with. You can get personal stuff loaded onto your Kindle but there is a small fee involved. On the other hand, the others, not including the Kindle are easy to pirate, but I won't get into that.

      Great hub, very informative.

      The Kindle fanatic.

    • susansisk profile image

      susansisk 6 years ago from Georgia, USA

      I have been looking at e-readers, so this was very helpful. My favorite is the new Nook color.

    • lovelypaper profile image

      Renee S 6 years ago from Virginia

      Thank you for an informative hub. I want one of these for Christmas.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      The Kindle $139 has WiFi. The Kindle $189 has WiFi + 3G. This means you can connect to stores online through Amazon's Whispernet network.

    • SJKSJK profile image

      SJKSJK 6 years ago from delray beach, florida

      I am planning to get a Kindle. It seems to meet my needs the best. I am confused about the difference between the 139 and 189 models. What's the difference.

    • profile image

      awesome77 6 years ago

      very useful and detailed info. I am leaning towards getting the ipad, but will look again at the nook and kindle just to be sure. Excellent hub indeed!

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      I have the older Sony Daily Edition but will be upgrading to the new one in a few weeks. Your problem with the Kindle 3G is the same reason my friend returned his. He is in college and he also couldn't get his epubs loaded. In my opinion, 3G is overrated. If you are dying to read a new book at the park or suburbs, I can see 3G being a must have feature. Right now, it's simple to load ebooks at home and go. I found the new Sony Daily Edition to be a worthy upgrade. eReaders are getting cheaper so unless you are a die hard reader like me, I would suggest buying a cheaper model. The Sony Daily Edition is on the expensive side but I really like the build quality and I am bias owning a previous model. I would suggest trying each eReader for yourself. They stay with you for hours and the purchase can be a very personal preference.

      As for color, if you are dying for one, you will have to settle for an iPad or NOOKcolor. If you want the low glare, wait a few generations. I will keep an eye out for the Chinese, Hanvon eReader and it's color e-ink screen. Thanks for the comment!

    • profile image

      Sheri 6 years ago

      I'm surprised the newer ones haven't combined all of the wanted features. I want one that has 3G, wifi, color , low glare, removable & long lasting battery life, and is compatable with my libraries ebooks. Is that too much to ask? I have heard so much praise for the Kindle 3G but it doesn't work with my library's ebooks. I also would really like to know which one you got and why.

    • SUSIE DUZY profile image

      SUSIE DUZY 6 years ago from Delray Beach, Florida

      Thanks for the info. I am planning to get an ereader and have been trying to figure out which one to get. This hub will come in handy.

    • profile image

      Maestrous 6 years ago

      Thanks for the great reviews. I recently bought a Kobo Wifi and find it easy to read.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Hannah,

      Thanks for the suggestion. I added a brief explanation at the end of each eReader. I kept it short because I wanted to be as objective as possible. Suggesting an eReader demands my opinion. I wanted to be as informative as possible but if my readers demand it, I will oblige. Thanks for the comment!

    • profile image

      Hannah 6 years ago

      Great site, but i still dont know if i want the NOOKcolor or the Kindle 3 any advice a little more like get this one because or dont get this one because :)

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Thanks Kim and Stephanie!

      I'm glad I could help. I'm updating this hub as more info is released so things are subject to change. Cheers!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image

      Stephanie Henkel 6 years ago from USA

      I'm thinking of buying a eReader and this is wonderful research with tons of great information. I appreciate finding all the descriptions and prices in one location.

    • kimballtrombone profile image

      kimballtrombone 6 years ago

      Great info! I've thought of an eReader for a Christmas gift. It's nice to see the comparisons.

    • Alternative Prime profile image

      Alternative Prime 6 years ago from > California

      I've tried them all and each has it's benefits and unique qualities or features.

      I can tell you from personal experience they do come in handy if your interested in consolidating a mountain of reading materials into one electronic devise.

    • Adroit Alien profile image
      Author

      Adroit Alien 6 years ago

      Desmond. I have extensive knowledge of batteries. The batteries used on Kindle 3 are either Lithion Polymers cylindrical cells(found in laptops) or prismatic cells(in cell phones). Lith poly batteries will lose capacity if they are deeply discharged. You have to have a really good battery management system that will cut off the amps at a very specific low voltage cutoff. In this case, the battery technically is never "drained" but shows a low enough voltage for the device to shut down. This is common in cell phones and newer electronics.

      As of now, the only "deep discharge/charge" lithium batteries are lithion manganese aka Sony Konion cells. Other deep cycle batteries are available in Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) chemistry.

      I understand that cycle life may not be an issue for some people. Especially if they tend to upgrade often. In this case, I am appealing to the people that will keep their eReaders for a long time. In this situation, yes, an enclosed battery is an issue. Take for example laptops. When the battery can't seem to hold a charge after a year or two, most people will spend $50-$70 to buy a new battery while few will spend $600 to buy a new laptop.

      As long as there is a type of memory that needs to run, ie clock or calender, there is a degree of discharge. Your calculation of a 20 year shelf life is not accurate. Lithium Polys, depending on cell quality and ambient temperature, will loss 4-10% capacity each year. Japanese cells tend to have the highest quality, followed by Taiwanese cells. Chinese cells generally have the lowest quality.

      Different chemistries react differently. For example, my 48V 20AH LiFePO4 battery would be hot off the charger at 60-64V. After a year of cold storage, it would read at 55V.

    • profile image

      Desmond 6 years ago

      I don't think that the lack of a removable battery is an issue at all. To day's batter can be survive 1000's deep charge cycles, cut that number in half, you get 500. I ready have 2-3 hours a day, I had my Kindle for 3 weeks and the battery still has not run out yet, OK, let's say you charge it every 2 weeks. 500 * 2 week is nearly 20 years! I bet you have a new book reader by then.

    • profile image

      Listerino 7 years ago

      Thanks great hub. I think I'm really excited about getting a Nook after reading this where before I was swaying towards a Kindle.

    • profile image

      maddy757 7 years ago

      wow.. thanks for the review. But even then i shall opt for kindle.

    • The Smiling Man profile image

      The Smiling Man 7 years ago from USA

      Nice! I was gonna get the nook, until you showed me that for $10 more I can get a kindle.