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Who to Trust to Repair My Computer?

Updated on September 28, 2017

Finding a Good Computer Repair Technician

Being a computer repair technician, I am ashamed of the type of quality that is out there when it comes to taking advantage of a client's lack of knowledge on the topic of computers after watching a video clip on the news recently. I know I am not able to service the entire world, lol, so I figured writing a short hub on how to find a trusted computer repair shop would be helpful for those in search of one.

Here are a couple of vital tips when looking for a "trustworthy" computer repair technician or business:

Ask around:

  • Talk to your friends and family, see who they have used and who they have come to trust. This is a big deal. Generally I would stay away from non-business related repairs, for example: my nephew is in 8th grade and can fix it, or Johnny down the street works on them at his day job. The reason for this is, sadly stereotypical scenario is, the repair will not happen on a timely fashion, and/or risk of your data being in the eyes of one with little accountability. Be cautious on who has access to your data while your not present.

Don't be afraid to:

  • Ask for upfront cost, or even an estimate from the company or tech. It is your money, don't forget they need you as much as you need them. If you feel the cost is too high, simply tell them you are calling around to get prices. The trusted companies will not be offended that you are doing that, they are often confident you will call back. Typically they will ask for you name, so when you call back they can reference the call prior.
  • Ask about their experience, don't worry about the certifications. Sometimes the certs look good, but doesn't say much for real world experience and client manors.
  • Certainly don't be afraid to ask questions while the tech is working on your computer. He/She shouldn't be offended that you ask, and should always be ready to answer, even if the answer is "I don't know." A good technician will always say let me look into that specific answer. This generally translates to, he/she knows an answer, but needs to think on it to be understood by one that may not know much computer terminology.

At the end of the day, the more educated you are with your computer, the less likely you will be a victim of an untrustworthy computer technician or business. Hopefully with the help of this hub, you will find a trustworthy tech/business, and help put the rest where they belong, "out of business."

The video below is an example of what is happening out there, when people are taken for their ignorance and burned.

Computer Repair Fraud Video

Final Thoughts

Isn't it crazy and frustrating what these companies wanted to blame the hard drive so quickly? There has been some times in the course of starting my business since 2004 that I made some mistakes, unintentionally, but never to take advantage of people like this video reflects. Business operations like this should be illegal. It borders scamming laws.

Again, educate yourself on the different parts of a computer, what they do, and keep your options open. I am not asking that you, yourself become a guru, however knowledge is power and the look on the technicians face when you call his/her bluff will be priceless. Always ask your friends, neighbors, and co-workers whom they use or have had good/bad experiences with.

Back when I was a child, G.I. Joe cartoons pushed the idea of "Now you know, and knowing is half the battle!" There is some great truth from this once a Saturday morning cartoon, consider the simplicity if it were applied to general day to day life.

You are not alone...

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  • profile image

    Colin Pernet 

    7 years ago

    My tech lives in my road. He charged us for a new hard drive. My Belarc report shows that the origianal serial numbers are still showing up after the new one was fitted. My Dell Inspiron 6000 2003 xp is now working OK. He refuses to write down the new serial numbers. I wonder why. Have to read between the lines.

    Thanks for your tips. From a 67 year old in Australia.

    Colin

    .

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