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What's New on the Net? 3-15-12

Updated on March 15, 2012

Red Light District on the Web?

Chatroulette
Chatroulette

Amazing High Resolution Photograph Linked Below


You used to be able to get lost in the crowd, but not anymore. Double click on any area in the picture to bring the person closer. Or, just click the mouse and use the mouse wheel to bring them closer.

This is a photograph of 2009 Inauguration. You can see IN FOCUS the face of EACH individual in the crowd !!! You can scan and zoom to any section of the crowd. . . Wait a few seconds. Double click anywhere . And the focus adjusts to give you a very identifiable close up.

The picture was taken with a robotic 1474 megapixel camera (295 times the standard 5 megapixel camera). Everyone attending could be scanned after the event, should something have gone wrong during it.


http://gigapan.org/viewGigapanFullscreen.php?auth=033ef14483ee899496648c2b4b06233c

9-28-10 AOL Negotiating to Buy "TechCrunch" Technology Blog

According to today's Wall Street Journal AOL is in discussions to buy TechCrunch, Michael Arrington's technology blog. The sources didn't disclose the terms and conditions under discussion. AOL previously acquired on-line media companies Patch Media Corp. and Going Inc. as a part of its strategy to build out the company's position in the local on-line market. These acquisitions were priced at under $10 million each. The Wall Street Journal reported that in January 2010 AOL acquired online video company Studio Now, Inc for $36.5 million.

Based on a Wall Street Journal report by Jessica E. Vascellaro

The blog is valued by Website Shadow at $42.3 million based on ad revenue of $4.4 million per year.


FACEBOOK RESPONDS--NYTIMES EDITORIAL 5-24-10

Published: May 24, 2010

Facebook built its base of nearly 500 million users on the notion that it was a place for people to connect with each other and post their likes, dislikes, photos, activities with as wide a circle as they chose to define. Facebook, in turn, used that information to show users advertisements based on their tastes.


But Facebook has become the focus of an increasingly heated debate over whether it was keeping its end of the bargain and giving users an easy, straightforward and consistent way to set their limits. It has regularly revised its privacy settings, made them harder to find and massaged the way it describes the meaning of privacy. Leaving Facebook for good is a complex chore.

These are legitimate concerns. After a public outcry, Facebook is responding to them by revising some of its privacy policies.

Last month, the company caused an uproar among privacy advocates and attracted the scrutiny of lawmakers when it redefined many items on users’ profiles — including friends, current city and job, their school, listed interests and Web sites they liked — as public information, broadly visible on topical pages and accessible by applications running on Facebook. It did not matter how private users wanted to keep the information.

Facebook also started a program allowing Web sites to access the public information of users who clicked Facebook “like” buttons and another to share users’ public information with corporate partners such as Yelp and Pandora to allow them to personalize their services to users’ tastes. Users can opt out, but the process is far from straightforward.

On Monday, Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, announced in an op-ed article in The Washington Post that over the next several months the company would “add privacy controls that are much simpler to use,” and “give you an easy way to turn off all third-party services.” The company added that it would trim the information considered public by default. That would be the right decision for a company that has become a powerful force in the way people communicate online.

Last year, following another consumer backlash over changes to its terms of service, Facebook introduced a set of principles that included this: “People should have the freedom to decide with whom they will share their information, and to set privacy controls to protect those choices.” Facebook would do well to abide by this rule.

Indeed, Facebook should commit to give users full control over the use and disclosure of their data. That means asking for permission every time it wants to use the information for a new purpose. It also means providing users — in a simple, intuitive way — with the information they need to decide who can see their data and how those details can be used.

Facebook’s existence is predicated on people wanting to share information about their lives. It should trust that users who want to share everything will and not force the hand of those who don’t want to.

A version of this editorial appeared in print on May 25, 2010, on page A26 of the New York edition.

Privacy is an Increasing Internet Issue

Internet privacy continues to be an issue with Google in Europe and with Facebook here in the U.S. and elsewhere. Germany, the Czech Republic, France and Spain have raised issues over Google's collection of information from wireless networks in its Street View project.

Facebook privacy issues involving the use of personal data for commercial and legal purposes are coming in for criticism from several quarters. The difficulty Facebook users encounter in utilizing Facebook's privacy options is also coming in for criticism.

Twitter is fighting a subpoena in Pennsylvania seeking the names of two Tweeters who criticized the Pennsylvania attorney general, Tom Corbett. Civil liberties groups oppose the subpoenas as a violation of civil liberties.

Privacy is apparently not on the minds of users of ChatRoulette or on many Facebook users either.

Check Your Internet Profile

Do you know what your online profile says about you? Do you know what's private and what's not? Here are some resources to help:

Reputationdefender.com: For $14.95 a month you can use My Reputation, a service that will aggregate all online references to make you "totally aware of your online presence."

The site also has software that will monitor your personal information (My Privacy, $9.95 a month); a service that monitors your child's online activity ($14.95 a month), and a service that attempts to control search results in your name ($99).

Brand-yourself.com: this site has a free Google Grade tool that tells you if the top 10 search results for your name are representing you well or not. It also has services that allow you to monitor what others are saying about you online.

Profilewatch.org: Tells you your online privacy score based on how much information it can find from your Facebook profile. It includes what you have publicly shared on Facebook.

Youropenbook.org: Want to see what Facebook is making public? This site takes content from Facebook that includes the phrase "don't tell anyone" or "cheated test" and publishes it for all to see. It's a statement that shows that what you think is private isn't really so.

Krista Jahnke in the Detroit Free Press

Comment: You can probably figure out yourself what's online about you by doing an occasional Google search and cleaning up your Facebook page and not putting anything out there that might compromise a job or school application or a future election campaign. You shouldn't have to pay anyone to do this for you.

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    • lovemychris profile image

      Yes Dear 7 years ago from Cape Cod, USA

      Chatroulette sounds very interesting...I work at a hotel, and like him--

      “I was really excited to work there, because I met, like, hundreds of different nations in a day,” Ternovskiy said recently.

      Last year, it was girls from Moldava...always had cool shoes! Every day new ones!

      The year before it was Russians and Lithuanians...

      Russian girls love Putin. Lithuanians love Obama!!

      Thanks for the info Ralph....I always stick to the same old sites...good to see something new.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Well, the New Yorker article about chatroulette.com was fascinating, but I tried the site and found it disappointing. When I logged onto chatroulette.com and fired up my web cam the first thing that popped up was a guy masturbating. I moved on and encountered several what appeared to be teenagers who called me "gramps" and xed me out without further comment. I didn't encounter anyone who wanted to engage in discussion (or any beautiful women).

      Thanks for your comment.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Now that the Library of Congress is archiving tweets and lawyers are using Facebook status updates in cross-examinations, how private are our online musings? Ira Flatow and guests discuss the ethical, legal and social issues associated with increasingly public social networking sites.

      NPR 5-20-10

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      reclaimprivacy.org

      http://www.reclaimprivacy.org/

      Keep up with the latest news about privacy policies on Facebook.

      * The Erosion of Facebook Privacy eff.org

      * Facebook Privacy Changes eff.org

      * 7 Things to Stop Doing Now on Facebook yahoo.com

      * Facebook's Gone Rogue wired.com

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Facebook should commit to give users full control over the use and disclosure of their data. That means asking for permission every time it wants to use the information for a new purpose. It also means providing users — in a simple, intuitive way — with the information they need to decide who can see their data and how those details can be used.

      Facebook’s existence is predicated on people wanting to share information about their lives. It should trust that users who want to share everything will and not force the hand of those who don’t want to.

      From NYTimes editorial 5-24-10

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      WolframAlpha a new computational website--http://www.wolframalpha.com/

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      “It has been a pretty intense few weeks for us,” said Mr. Zuckerberg, who added that he had been huddled with other senior executives for the last two weeks to help shape Facebook’s response. NYTimes 5-26

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      After a towing company hauled Justin Kurtz’s car from his apartment complex parking lot, despite his permit to park there, Mr. Kurtz, 21, a college student in Kalamazoo, Mich., went to the Internet for revenge.

      Outraged at having to pay $118 to get his car back, Mr. Kurtz created a Facebook page called “Kalamazoo Residents against T&J Towing.” Within two days, 800 people had joined the group, some posting comments about their own maddening experiences with the towing company.

      T&J filed a defamation suit against Mr. Kurtz, claiming the site was hurting business and seeking $750,000 in damages.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/01/us/01slapp.html

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Former Gateway Computer CEO, Rick Snyder is one of the leading GOP candidates for governor of Michigan this year.

    • Lady_E profile image

      Elena 7 years ago from London, UK

      Wow, 500 Million. That's a loooooooot of users. Interesting Hub. I heard something about security probs on Facebook but you have explained it better. This is a good Hub to Bookmark to keep up with the situ - with lots of info.

      Best Wishes.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Barnes & Noble, the national bookseller, announced Monday that it was dropping the price of its six-month-old Nook e-reader to $199 from $259 and introducing a new version of the device, which connects to the Internet only over Wi-Fi networks, for $149.

      Responding rapidly, Amazon.com then cut the price of its popular Kindle e-reader below the Nook, to $189 from $259.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      In a major victory for Google in its battle with media companies, a federal judge in New York on Wednesday threw out Viacom’s $1 billion copyright infringement lawsuit against Google’s YouTube, the No. 1 Internet video-sharing site.

      The ruling in the closely watched case could have major implications for the scores of Internet sites, like YouTube and Facebook, that are largely built with content uploaded by their users.

      The judge granted Google’s motion for summary judgment, saying the company was shielded from Viacom’s copyright claims by “safe harbor” provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

      Those provisions generally protect a Web site from liability for copyrighted material uploaded by its users as long as the operator of the site takes down the material when notified by its rightful owner that it was uploaded without permission.

      NYTimes 6-23-10 Read the entire article here

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/24/technology/24goo...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A Red Light District on the Web?

      The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers on Friday agreed to move forward on a long-standing proposal from a Florida company to create a specialized dot-xxx suffix for adult entertainment Web sites. But the plan upset much of the adult entertainment industry. It joined hands with religious groups in lobbying against it, arguing that the new domains would lead to regulation and marginalization.

      NYTimes 6-26-10 http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/26/technology/26dom...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      NYTimes--6-28-10--Turns out it was Time.com and Politico, both well-financed, reputable news media organizations, that blithely stepped over the line and took what was not theirs.

      Both companies said that a frenzy involving a significant national issue was under way and that because Rolling Stone itself did not post the article on its site, they took matters into their own hands. Each said that when Rolling Stone protested, it was taken down, and that when the magazine put up the piece at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, their sites linked to that instead.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      7-15-10NYTimes:

      "The potential impact of Google’s algorithm on the Internet economy is such that it is worth exploring ways to ensure that the editorial policy guiding Google’s tweaks is solely intended to improve the quality of the results and not to help Google’s other businesses.

      Some early suggestions for how to accomplish this include having Google explain with some specified level of detail the editorial policy that guides its tweaks. Another would be to give some government commission the power to look at those tweaks."

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/15/opinion/15thu3.h...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 7 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      7-18-10NYTimes--On the Internet, users supply the raw material that helps generate billions of dollars a year in online advertising revenue. Search requests, individual profiles on social networks, Web browsing habits, posted pictures and many Internet messages are all mined to serve up targeted online ads.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/18/business/18unbox...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Amazon.com will introduce two new versions of the Kindle e-reader on Thursday, one for $139, the lowest price yet for the device.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A revolution in traditional publishing is under way for writers, readers and publishers thanks to the Internet.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google and Verizon, two leading players in Internet service and content, are nearing an agreement that could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content’s creators are willing to pay for the privilege. NYTimes 8-5-10

    • profile image

      Wiz 6 years ago

      It comes down to the same old question that brought the Romans to their knees: "Quis Custodiet ipsos custodes" (Who will guard the guards?)

      Our government, bribed by extortionist corporations, condoned by our so called Supreme Court, now only goes through the motions of democracy in order to hide the oligarchy of capitalist thuggery that controls Washington.

      What's tragic about what I've just written is that it isn't hyperbole, but fact.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Yep!

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Joe Nocera on Net Neutrality

      So there we now stand. Net neutrality is in limbo because the public interest purists believe that any compromise is a sellout, and because the F.C.C. so badly shot itself in the foot by pursuing the Comcast case. It is difficult to see how we’re ever going to get net neutrality rules.

      Then again, maybe the current snarl isn’t such a bad thing. “If everybody just walked away, the probability of anything bad happening is quite small,” said Mr. Moffett. I agree. Consumers have come to expect an open Internet, and companies will violate net neutrality at their peril. That is just the way the Internet has evolved.

      But don’t spread that around, O.K.? With so many hours spent on this thing, who really wants to admit that it’s much ado about very little?

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/04/business/04nocer...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      9-4-10

      Craigslist, the popular Web site for classified ads, has blocked access to its “adult services” section and replaced the link with a black label showing the word “censored.”

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/05/technology/05cra...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      9-28-10 AOL Negotiating to Buy "TechCrunch" Technology Blog

      Click edit above to add content to this empty capsule.

      According to today's Wall Street Journal AOL is in discussions to buy TechCrunch, Michael Arrington's technology blog. The sources didn't disclose the terms and conditions under discussion. AOL previously acquired on-line media companies Patch Media Corp. and Going Inc. as a part of its strategy to build out the company's position in the local on-line market. These acquisitions were priced at under $10 million each. The Wall Street Journal reported that in January 2010 AOL acquired online video company Studio Now, Inc for $36.5 million.

      Based on a Wall Street Journal report by Jessica E. Vascellaro

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A powerful new suite of capabilities will become available to Web developers that could give marketers and advertisers access to many more details about computer users’ online activities. Nearly everyone who uses the Internet will face the privacy risks that come with those capabilities, which are an integral part of the Web language that will soon power the Internet: HTML 5.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google has been stunningly adept at devising computer algorithms to help people search the Internet. But when it comes to building features for social networking, the company has been much less effective.

      Vic Gundotra, a Google vice president, is responsible for mobile applications.

      And changing that is one of the company’s biggest business challenges these days.

      Google depends on having its finger on the pulse of the entire Internet, and maintaining its status as the primary entree to the Web. But as people spend more time on closed social networks like Facebook, where much of the data they share is off limits to search engines, Google risks losing the competition for Web users’ time, details of their lives and, ultimately, advertising.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/18/technology/18goo...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A number of Facebook’s early employees are giving up their stable jobs, free food and laundry service to build their own businesses. Many of them are leaving as wealthy, either on paper or after cashing in their ownership stakes to do what they say they like best: start companies.

      More here:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/03/technology/03fac...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      NYTimes:

      Students have always faced distractions and time-wasters. But computers and cellphones, and the constant stream of stimuli they offer, pose a profound new challenge to focusing and learning.

      Researchers say the lure of these technologies, while it affects adults too, is particularly powerful for young people. The risk, they say, is that developing brains can become more easily habituated than adult brains to constantly switching tasks — and less able to sustain attention.

      “Their brains are rewarded not for staying on task but for jumping to the next thing,” said Michael

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/technology/21bra...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      11-28-10NYTimes--"A Bully Finds a Pulpit on the Web"

      * A Bully Finds a Pulpit on the Web--The Perils of Shopping on the Internet

      This long article tells the story of Vitaly Borker an unscrupulous Internet marketer of eyeglasses and one of his victims Clarabelle Rodriguez who courageously fought back against harassment by Mr. Vitaly and unresponsive banks, including CitiBank.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Signaling a sea change in the debate over Internet privacy, the government’s top consumer protection agency on Wednesday advocated a plan that would let consumers choose whether they want their Internet browsing and buying habits monitored.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/02/business/media/0...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      GROUPON A BARGAIN FOR GOOGLE AT $6 Billion?

      As investors fret that Google’s $6 billion bid for Groupon is too high a price to pay, new details about the company’s sales and growth suggest that it might be more like one of Groupon’s cut-rate deals.

      http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2010/12/01/googles-bid...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      "Less than a decade after the dot-com bust taught Wall Street and Silicon Valley investors that what goes up does not keep going up forever, a growing number of entrepreneurs and a few venture capitalists are beginning to wonder if investments in tech start-ups are headed toward another big bust.

      "The chief evidence, according to industry experts and analysts, is the way venture capitalists and established companies are clamoring to give money to young companies, including those with only a shred of an idea. They are piling into me-too start-ups that imitate popular Web companies that already received financing. Companies that involve social shopping, mobile photo sharing and new social networking are finding it easy to attract investors because no one wants to miss the next big thing."

      MORE:

      http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2010/12/03/a-silicon-b...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      NY Times 12-7-10

      Federal law enforcement agents on Monday arrested a Brooklyn Internet merchant who mistreated customers because he thought their online complaints raised the profile of his business in Google searches.

      Federal postal authorities with Vitaly Borker after they arrested him on Monday at his home in Brooklyn.

      Related

      Postal inspectors removing boxes after searching Mr. Borker’s home.

      The merchant, Vitaly Borker, 34, who operates a Web site called decormyeyes.com, was charged with one count each of mail fraud, wire fraud, making interstate threats and cyberstalking. The mail fraud and wire fraud charges each carry a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. The stalking and interstate threats charges carry a maximum sentence of five years.

      He was arrested early Monday by agents of the United States Postal Inspection Service. In an arraignment in the late afternoon in United States District Court in Lower Manhattan, Judge Michael H. Dolinger denied Mr. Borker’s request for bail, stating that the defendant was either “verging on psychotic” or had “an explosive personality.” Mr. Borker will be detained until a preliminary hearing, scheduled for Dec. 20.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/07/business/07borke...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      HOW far does consumer privacy protection lag behind data-collection systems, those advanced technologies that media companies use to gather, share and profit from our personal information?

      Too far, according to two privacy advocates.

      “Solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual; but modern enterprise and invention have, through invasions upon his privacy, subjected him to mental pain and distress,” the privacy experts wrote in the Harvard Law Review. “In this, as in other branches of commerce, the supply creates demand,” they added; and that demand, they noted, ends up broadcasting our private matters in public spheres.

      Sound familiar?

      The review article, written in 1890 by the young lawyers Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis, concerned the spread of that era’s viral technology: snapshot photography. Newspaper photographers, the lawyers wrote, were feeding an “unseemly gossip” industry by taking and publishing candid shots of people without their consent.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/business/12strea...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      How the NYTimes Manages Reader Comments:

      The system of commenting at The Times owes much of its success to the human beings who actually moderate comments — read them, filter them and decide which ones to publish. This filtering process yields, in many cases, substantive commentary by a readership that feels empowered to participate online — a combination that I believe is of great value. Many other news sites offer comments areas, but because they are not human-moderated, they are deluged with snappy tripe that scrolls on endlessly.

      Jonathan Landman, now The Times’s culture editor, recounted that the comments feature began four years ago as a replacement for forums where readers could exchange views. The unsupervised forums, he said, had devolved into something less than Timesian.

      “They were taken over by crazy people with aluminum foil on their heads,” said Mr. Landman, who headed online operations at the time.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/opinion/12pubed....

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Time Magazine's Man of the Year, Mark Zuckerberg

      At just 26, Mark Zuckerberg, the co-founder and chief executive of Facebook, is joining a select group of presidents, kings, popes, dictators, freedom fighters and other influential people selected by Time magazine as Person of the Year.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Anonymity and the dark side of the Internet--Stanley Fish in the NYTimes:

      The practice of withholding the identity of the speaker is strategic, and one purpose of the strategy (this is the second problem with anonymity) is to avoid responsibility and accountability for what one is saying. Anonymity, Martha Nussbaum, a professor of law and philosophy at the University of Chicago observes, allows Internet bloggers “to create for themselves a shame-free zone in which they can inflict shame on others.” The power of the bloggers, she continues, “depends on their ability to insulate their Internet selves from responsibility in the real world, while ensuring real-world consequences” for those they injure....

      http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/03/an...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      MySpace Crushed in Murdoch Clutches

      As Facebook was negotiating a half-billion-dollar investment from Goldman Sachs recently, MySpace, once the dominant Web site for social networking, was preparing to fire nearly half its staff.

      Wendy and Rupert Murdoch were early supporters of MySpace.com founders Tom Anderson and Chris DeWolfe, left to right. In the past, Mr. Murdoch met the founders for impromptu beers.

      The layoffs, which cut nearly 500 employees from a payroll of close to 1,100, were announced Tuesday. The downsizing is the most draconian yet for the beleaguered company, and could be a precursor to a sale of the site by the News Corporation, which bought MySpace in 2005 for $580 million after a bidding war with Viacom.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/12/technology/inter...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google has weathered criticism in the past that it has copied some features of Microsoft’s Bing search engine, like background images. Now it has turned the tables, contending that Bing copies something much more important: search results.

      http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/02/01/google-to...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      AOL Buying Huffingtonpost.com

      For those of us who were around for the last content boom on the Web – Remember 2000? Remember synergy? – AOL’s decision to buy The Huffington Post has an echo of AOL’s last effort at transformation, the now infamous merger with Time Warner.

      The numbers are very different – HuffPo went for $300 million in cash and $15 million in stock while the price of AOL getting its hands on Time Warner was $182 billion in stock and debt. But still the price turned heads: at about 10 times HuffPo’s revenue of $31 million, AOL paid a hefty premium for a new-media asset, perhaps because the merger creates a new behemoth with a combined audience of 117 million unique visitors in the United States.

      More important, it will give AOL, which until now has been a big blob of content, a legacy of its days as a portal, a unique identity and perspective. Now in addition to tech sites like TechCrunch and Engadget, AOL will have a huge brand name in politics and a new editorial director in Arianna Huffington, who has shown an ability to engage audiences, build community and get the visitors to generate content as well.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      In agreeing to buy The Huffington Post for $315 million, AOL is putting what appears to be a significant premium on the ability to attract and build a community of readers.

      Yet as more and more advertising dollars flow to the Web and to mobile devices, demand is rising for popular and prolific online content producers like The Huffington Post. The market for online advertising is expected to increase 14 percent, to $51.9 billion, this year, according to the research firm Borrell Associates.

      With that kind of growth, the deal for The Huffington Post is expected to raise the bar for other independent online media companies whose audiences have surged with the help of social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook.

      http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/02/07/huffington-...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Yahoo Said to be Moving Toward Personalized Content

      Confronted by declining revenue and a steady stream of prominent departures, Yahoo plans to announce that it is developing a publishing platform for applications that would let users get personalized content on their phones and other mobile devices.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/07/technology/07yah...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
      Author

      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      An example of an art and science at which The Huffington Post excels: search engine optimization, or S.E.O. The term covers a wide range of behind-the-scenes tactics for getting search engine users to visit a Web site, like choosing story topics based on popular searches.

      Because Google is many Internet users’ front door to the Web, S.E.O. has become an obsession for many Web publishers, and successful ones use the strategies to varying degrees. But as newspapers, magazines, blogs and online-only news sites increasingly compete for readers, they are making it more of a priority than ever and adopting new techniques, like trying to maximize pass-alongs on social networks.

      The Huffington Post’s skill at using these tactics to increase readership and revenue was one of the ways it made itself worth $315 million to AOL, which acquired it this week. And Demand Media, which runs sites like eHow and Answerbag.com and values search engine optimization perhaps more than any other publisher, raised $151 million in a public offering in January.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/11/business/media/1...

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google has described one crucial factor in detail: links from one site to another.

      If you own a Web site, for instance, about Chinese cooking, your site’s Google ranking will improve as other sites link to it. The more links to your site, especially those from other Chinese cooking-related sites, the higher your ranking. In a way, what Google is measuring is your site’s popularity by polling the best-informed online fans of Chinese cooking and counting their links to your site as votes of approval.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/13/business/13searc...

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Net Neutrality Back in Court

      The lawsuits filed by Verizon and MetroPCS earlier this year against the F.C.C.’s net neutrality rules are disappointing. The suits fall into a swirl of antiregulatory fervor among Republicans on Capitol Hill.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/07/opinion/07mon3.h...

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      How the Internet Tried to Kill Me!

      WHEN I Googled myself last month, I was alarmed to find the following item, from a Wikia.com site on psychology, ranked fourth among the results:

      “Zick Rubin (1944-1997) was an American social psychologist.”

      This was a little disconcerting. I really was born in 1944 and I really was an American social psychologist. Before I entered law school in midlife, I was a professor of psychology at Harvard and Brandeis and had written books in the field. But, to the very best of my knowledge, I wasn’t dead.

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Facebook sued by murder victim's relatives over photo of victim's body.

      The picture of Caroline Wimmer in death showed her after she had been beaten and strangled with an electric cord. The family reeled.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/30/nyregion/30about...

      Facebook has rules that bar precisely these kinds of pictures, but they generally are enforced only when members complain about them, not through advance screening done by the company. Photos come in by the millions every month; Facebook says its users share 30 billion pieces of content every month. They also grant the company nearly unlimited rights to use that data any way it wants.

      A 1996 federal law, the Communications Decency Act, gives online service providers broad protection from any responsibility for what people say or do on their sites. It is thought to be a cornerstone of free speech on the Web. It also protected Facebook from legal responsibility for the grotesque act of Mr. Musarella, who ultimately pleaded guilty to official misconduct.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A security breach has exposed the e-mail addresses of millions of customers for major banks and retailers.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/05/business/05hack....

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      In the past couple of weeks, a Web site called Outsports.com has written about a gay Brigham Young athlete who abided by the university’s honor code, published an essay from a lesbian basketball player at a Catholic girls school in California, and featured the Miami (Ohio) hockey team a year after the death of the openly gay student manager Brendan Burke, a son of Toronto Maple Leafs General Manager Brian Burke.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/08/sports/08outspor...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Could alleged email cost Mark Zuckerberg 50% of Facebook?

      Ceglia, a New York state businessman, has produced new evidence in his case against Facebook. Last year, Ceglia filed a lawsuit claiming that Zuckerberg had signed a contract in 2003 that awarded Ceglia $1,000 and a 50-percent stake in the fledgeling social network. In return, Ceglia said that he worked as a designer and developer on Zuckerberg's site, while Zuckerberg worked as a coder for Ceglia's StreetFax.com.

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/12/paul-cegl...

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      5-3-11NY Times--RightHaven law firm profits from copyright lawsuits against on-line unauthorized users of copyrighted material.

      Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven’s tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling Web sites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name.

      Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Mr. Drudge. But little known Web sites, nonprofit groups and so-called mom-and-pop bloggers — people who blog as a hobby — are not exempt from Righthaven’s legal actions.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/business/media/0...

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      5-5-11NYTimes

      BEIJING — A powerful arm of China’s government said Wednesday that it had created a new central agency to regulate every corner of the nation’s vast Internet community, a move that appeared to complement a continuing crackdown on political dissidents and other social critics.

      But the vaguely worded announcement left unclear whether the new agency, the State Internet Information Office, would in fact supersede a welter of ministries and other government offices that already claim jurisdiction over parts of cyberspace.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Blekko uses a search algorithm like Google’s or Bing’s but also gets humans, mostly volunteers, to identify the sites they know, trust and visit most often and to put those at the top of the search results.

      NYTimes 5-8-11

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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      If you post a photo on the Web, it still belongs to you, right? Well, be sure to read the fine print. The terms of service agreements for Internet services often reveal the tenuous hold people have over what they post online.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/23/technology/23ter...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/21/us/21anonymity.h...

      The collective intelligence of the Internet’s two billion users, and the digital fingerprints that so many users leave on Web sites, combine to make it more and more likely that every embarrassing video, every intimate photo, and every indelicate e-mail is attributed to its source, whether that source wants it to be or not. This intelligence makes the public sphere more public than ever before and sometimes forces personal lives into public view.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google introduces Facebook competitor, emphasizing privacy.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 6 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Open-Access Advocate Arrested for Huge Download - NYTimes.com

      Harvard researcher and Internet folk hero Aaron Swartz has been arrested for allegedly hacking into networks at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to download articles.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/20/us/20compute.htm...

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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      YouTube Founders Revamping a Site for Link Sharing

      Chad Hurley and Steve Chen have some experience with turning a small Web site into Internet gold. In 2006 they sold their scrappy start-up YouTube to Google for $1.65 billion.

      More recently they picked an unlikely candidate to be their next Web sensation: a Yahoo castoff.

      The men are trying to inject new life into Delicious, a social bookmarking service that, in its time, was popular among the technorati, but failed to catch on with a broader audience.

      “What we plan to do,” Mr. Hurley said in an interview here last week, “is try to introduce Delicious to the rest of the world.”

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      If Shakespeare had an iPad, the poignant, prickly history of its magical inventor would have made the perfect family drama for the Bard.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/12/opinion/prospero...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Cell phone apps locate potential dates nearby.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/03/business/cellpho...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Google Changes Search Algorithm, Trying to Make Results More Timely - NYTimes.com

      Google made an unusually wide-reaching change to its search algorithm to show more real-time results.

      http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/03/google-ch...

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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Larry Page returned to the helm of Google to find it bloated, unwieldy and hard to move quickly. He’s working to change all that.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/10/technology/googl...

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      Steal This Column - NYTimes.com Bill Keller op-ed

      The partisans of an unfettered Internet won the last skirmish in Washington. So is any attempt to police online piracy doomed?

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      2-9-12NYTimes--"Internet Piracy Debate, Deciding if the Sky is Falling"

      In Piracy Debate, Deciding if the Sky Is Falling - NYTimes.com

      Media and Internet giants at odds over dealing with purloined content on the Web may need to agree first on exactly how bad the problem is.

    • Ralph Deeds profile image
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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      A Code of Conduct for Content Aggregators

      So where is the line between promoting the good work of others and simply lifting it? Naughty aggregation is analogous to pornography: You know it when you see it.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/12/business/media/g...

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      Ralph Deeds 5 years ago from Birmingham, Michigan

      3-15-12WSJ--Google Refreshes Its Search Algorithm

      Google Gives Search a Refresh - WSJ.com

      Google is giving its tried-and-true Web-search formula a makeover as it tries to fix the shortcomings of today's technology and maintain its dominant market share.

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