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Making a Binaural Beats Track with Audacity

Updated on July 6, 2010

Audacity Tip: Where is the Track Panel?

Binaural beats help us change our state of mind, or do they? I wanted to find out so I worked with the open source software, Audacity, which can be freely downloaded from Sourceforge.

While you're there, also download the MP3 encoder, LAME.You'll need that when you are done editing your binaural beats and want to export an mp3 file from Audacity.

Let's Begin Making a Binaural Beats Track
from an Existing MP3 File

What this Recording Does

It begins with a beat frequency approximating alertness and active thinking (20Hz) and gradually lowers to relaxation (8Hz). I used a 7 minute track (you can use any of your favorite trance type mp3s).

If you are seriously testing this out, use a longer track.

Ready to Begin Recording?

  • Open Audacity and choose Project, Import Audio to fetch a music track
  • Split Stereo Track (from the Track Panel drop down menu found at the left of the music track - see sidebar tip if necessary)
  • Choose Project, New Audio Track
  • From the Track Panel on the new track, select Left Channel from the drop-down menu
  • Again choose Project, New Audio Track
  • From the Track Panel on the new track, select Right Channel
  • Select the Left Audio Track by clicking once on the Track Panel
  • From top menu, choose Generate, Tone
    • I chose 100Hz for frequency
    • Enter a length in seconds equal to the imported audio
  • Choose Effect, Amplify (I used -20 in Amplification (DB))
  • Set the cursor about 20 seconds into the track
  • Choose Edit, Select, Start to Cursor
  • Choose Effect, Fade In
  • Set the cursor about 20 seconds before the end of the track
  • Choose Edit, Select, Cursor to End
  • Effect, Fade Out
  • Select the blank Right Audio Track by clicking once the Track Panel
  • From top menu, choose Generate, Tone
    • I chose 120Hz for frequency (has to differ from the left)
    • Enter a length in seconds equal to the imported audio
  • Choose Effect, Amplify (I used -20 in Amplification (DB))
  • At minute 4, I clicked into the track (I had a 7 minute track)
  • Edit, Select, Start to Cursor
  • Effect, Change Pitch
    • I entered 120Hz for the starting frequency
    • I entered 110Hz for the ending frequency
  • Click back into the track at minute 4 (or whatever minute you used)
  • Edit, Select, Cursor to End
  • Effect, Change Pitch
    • I entered 110Hz for the starting frequency
    • I entered 108Hz for the ending frequency
  • Set the cursor about 20 seconds into the track
  • Choose Edit, Select, Start to Cursor
  • Choose Effect, Fade In
  • Set the cursor about 20 seconds before the end of the track
  • Choose Edit, Select, Cursor to End
  • Effect, Fade Out
  • File, Export as MP3 (Audacity may prompt you to locate lame_enc.dll so you will have to have Lame installed ... very simple default install)
  • Now for the fun, plop on the headphones (headphones are necessary) and throw you cares to the wind.
  • Don't forget to check back with me and let me know how it went ...

Comments

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    • profile image

      Improved version 

      4 years ago

      I'm unsure whether this was done with an older version of audacity or if the author was just unaware of the feature, but Generate } Chirp is a more efficient process for this.

    • profile image

      Anon 

      6 years ago

      It would be better to use .wav, or .flac, since mp3 has audio loss...

    • profile image

      Liz 

      6 years ago

      Thank you I'd been trying to figure this out and was on the right track. Having your step-by-step really helped.

      What if it's set at 200Hz on left with adjustments of 220 to 208Hz in the right side?

      Unfortunately Lame did not install on my OS. I'll simply save as WAV and convert to mp3.

    • Carol Robertson profile imageAUTHOR

      Carol Robertson 

      8 years ago

      Hi M --

      The purpose of that amplification adjustment is to get the beat at a level where it is masked somewhat by the actual music you want to listen to. If there is no audio showing at all, then the amplification won't matter. With just the beat track you should be able to hear the thrum.

    • profile image

      8 years ago

      if i put amplification in negative (-20), will it have effect? i mean there r no sound at all about the frequency>>

    working

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