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Power Strips with Long Cords

Updated on January 31, 2014

Power Strips and Safety

FInding power strips and surge protectors with long power cords is not an easy task. Out in town, it is usually difficult to find a powerstrip that has a power cord over 6 foot in length. If an electrical outlets are not where they need to be located in the room, many people resort to using extension cords and power splitters to temporarily create multiple outlets where they need them. Sometimes people tether the powerstrip to and extension cord or daisey chain one power strip to the next. Doing any of those scenarios is not a good idea. It is dangerous fire hazard and is almost always against applicable fire code for your area.

International Fire Code 2009 Edition 605.4.2 states, "Relocatable power taps shall be directly connected to permanently installed receptacles." Translation, power strips need to be directly connected to the wall and not to an extension cord or to another power strip that is connected to the wall.

Power Strips with Long Cords vs. Extension Cords

Trying to use extension cords with a power strip, or two power strips with one daisy chained into the other, is just plain dangerous. Every time you make a new connection, you add resistance to the circuit and resistance equals heat. When extension cords become overloaded, they can become hot enough to to melt and the wire hot enough to start an electrical fire. The problem with extension cords is there is no circuit breaker protection built into the cord. Yes, you would still have the circuit breaker or fuse in the house or buildings electrical panel, but the rate is usually much higher on those. Power strips almost always include a resettable circuit breaker protection in the event that too much electrical load is placed on the line or in the case of a short circuit or power spike. They are considered a safer alternative than the standard electrical splitter that plugs directly into an outlet.

Anytime you are dealing with electric, you should also make sure that what you are buying is UL Certified and that the length of the cord is not longer than necessary. In the US, all powerstrips sold must have the Underwriters Laboratory seal to be sold legally.

While most power strips top out at around 6 feet, there are a few power strips, such as the ones belso, with much longer power cords. It is recommended that you only the length you will actually need.

Tripp Lite 25 Foot 8 Outlet Power Strip

Tripp Lite 8 Outlet Surge Protector Power Strip, 25ft Cord Right Angle Plug, & $75K INSURANCE (TLP825)
Tripp Lite 8 Outlet Surge Protector Power Strip, 25ft Cord Right Angle Plug, & $75K INSURANCE (TLP825)

Double row offers 3 well spaced outlets on one side that allows for plugging in large power adapters while not covering adjacent outlets.

 

Getting 8 electrical outlets to the other side of a room has never been easier. One row contains 3 outlets with The Tripp Lite power strip power switch has an integrated 15 amp circuit breaker to provide surge protection on all 8 outlets. It also comes with LEDs indicators to diagnose any wiring problems and suppressor damage. The power strip can be wall mounted as it comes with keyhole mounting slots on the backside of the unit.

Tripp Lite stands behind this unit. They provide a lifetime product replacement warranty along with $75,000 Ultimate Lifetime Insurance.

Is 25 Foot of Cord Too Long?

Kensington makes a great and inexpensive 15 foot power strip.

The Kensington power strip does not mention in the description that this is a great choice for when the power strip is to be plugged into an electrical outlet with a desk or furniture against it. It has a flat, angled plug, so the furniture does not need to be pushed away from the wall like a traditional power strip. The switch is illuminated so that it easy to verify that the strip is receiving power and turned on all at the same time.

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