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Proven Guide to Prepare for EASA Part 66 Licence Examinations

Updated on December 16, 2015

What is EASA Part 66

European Aviation Safety Agency EASA Part 66 requirements provides the guidelines and standard required for obtaining aircraft maintenance licence and scopes of such licences. Information provided in the Part 66 requirements provides qualifications required to obtain the AML, the training and experience required and contents and quality requirement of such training. By going through the part 66 guidelines, it is important to understand the standard expected from students who are preparing to sit for the licencing examination conducted by an approved training centre by the EASA. A student who wants to prepare for licencing examination must have clear understanding on points highlighted in the Hub. Also, you can download free training materials published by FAA under resources provided in this Hub. .

EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed  Aircraft Maintenance Engineer
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

What is the licence category?

The students must have clear understanding about licence category in order to focus their studies to a specific segment in the aircraft maintenance, such as turbine engine aircraft, turbine engine helicopters, piston engine aircraft or avionics. EASA Part 66 licence has following categories. Please refer EASA Part 66 for detail information on each category.

  • A1 and B1.1 Aeroplanes Turbine
  • A2 and B1.2 Aeroplanes Piston
  • A3 and B1.3 Helicopters Turbine
  • A4 and B1.4 Helicopters Piston
  • Category B2
  • Category C

Applicable Subject Modules for Each Licence Category

(click column header to sort results)
Subject modules  
A or B1 aeroplane Turbine engine(s)  
A or B1 aeroplane Piston engine(s)  
A or B1 helicopter Turbine engine(s  
A or B1 helicopter Piston engine(s)  
B2 Avionics  
1 - Mathematics
x
x
x
x
x
2- Physics
x
x
x
x
x
3 – Electrical Fundamentals
x
x
x
x
x
4 – Electronic Fundamentals
x
x
x
x
x
5 – Digital Techniques Electronic Instrument systems
x
x
x
x
x
6 – Materials and Hardware
x
x
x
x
x
7 – Maintenance Practices
x
x
x
x
x
8 – Basic Aerodynamics
x
x
x
x
x
9 – Human Factors
x
x
x
x
x
10 – Aviation Legislation
x
x
x
x
x
11A – Turbine Aeroplane Aerodynamics, Structures and systems
x
x
x
x
x
11B – Piston Aeroplane Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems
 
x
 
 
 
12 – Helicopter Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems
 
 
x
x
 
13- Aircraft Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems
 
 
 
 
x
14 – Propulsion
 
 
 
 
x
15 – Gas Turbine Engines
x
 
x
 
 
16 – Piston Engines
 
x
 
x
 
17 - Propellers
x
x
 
 
 
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

How multiple type questions are formulated?

Multiple-choice questions are used to measure the leaning objectives of EASA Part 66 requirements. Questions are formulated to test the candidates’ ability on one or more following aspects in order to verify the attainment of learning objectives:

  • Analyse phenomena
  • Apply principles to new situations
  • Comprehend concepts and principles
  • Discriminate between fact and opinion
  • Interpret cause-and-effect relationships
  • Interpret charts and graphs
  • Judge the relevance of information
  • Make inferences from given data
  • Solve problems

The knowledge level of multiple-choice questions are established by rephrasing the answers and/or changing the order of the alternatives. Multiple choice questions are formulated based on following principal criterion Students must have clear understanding about the structure of multiple type question in order to answer successfully.

  • Questions are written in Aviation language.
  • Questions that require specialised knowledge of specific aircraft types are not asked in a basic licence examination.
  • Multiple-choice questions have three alternative answers of which only one is correct answer.
  • Student is allowed a time per module examination, based on average of 75 seconds per question into number of questions for the subject module.
  • The examination is designed to measure knowledge levels acquired by the students through attaining the learning objectives.
  • Diagrams are used in appropriate questions for providing better descriptiveness and in order to remain close to reality.
  • Calculators are not allowed during examination; all calculations are feasible without a calculator or approximate values are mentioned if complex calculations are involved in a particular question.
  • Use of abbreviations, and acronyms are limited. However, only internationally recognised abbreviations, acronyms that commonly employed in the specific subject or aviation field are used, without an additional spelled-out explanation in brackets.
  • The use of units follows the international rules and style conventions.
  • Questions are formulated to cover the category, syllabus and the required knowledge levels.
  • The layout of question are homogenous and one font is used for the question and the answer text.

How essay type questions are formulated?

Understanding the criterions for formulating essay type questions is important to develop successful answers. The prime objective of essay type questions in EASA Part 66 module examinations is to test following aspects on the students.

  • Clear and concise writing ability
  • Use of technical report format
  • Use of technical language of the aviation industry
  • Technical knowledge
  • Practical application of technical knowledge in maintenance scenarios.

Following are the criterion used to formulate essay type questions for module 7, 9 and 10 in the Part 66 module examinations.

  • Questions are broad enough to be answered by students as per the licence category or sub-categories and comply following.
  • The question topics selected are generic and applicable to all applicable licence categories.
  • Applicable to general areas of aircraft maintenance that reflects common working practices.
  • Questions are not manufacturer specific and avoids subjects that are rarely found in practice.
  • Tailor made for students who have limited practical experience.
  • When raising questions the following points are considered:
  • Time allowed for each essay type question is 20 minutes.
  • A4 paper is provided for each answer and if required the answer can be extended onto additional pages.
  • The question is formulated in such manner so that student can develop an answer that meet the knowledge level required for particular subject or topic.
  • The question is designed with clarity with sufficient scope that requires broad reply.
  • The question is designed in such way that the answer should be written in a technical report style, in a logical sequence with an introduction, middle and conclusion using relevant technical terms and key points required in the answer.
  • Questions do not ask for drawings or sketches to support the answer.
  • Questions are formulated to test the ability of the students to apply the theoretical knowledge in practical aircraft maintenance situations.

The answers for essay type questions are marked based on following guidelines.

  • The total points for each question is 100 and answer requires a combination of the technical element reflecting key points and the report style element.
  • Each key point is graded and allocated with weights. The total weight of key points will represent 60% of the mark.
  • Key points are the main elements of the answer that may be knowledge or experience-based that include maintenance orientated factors such as safety precautions or legislative practices.
  • The answer will be analysed for the clarity and for the technical report writing presented with weighting allocated and represent 40% of the mark.
  • The answer should demonstrate the ability of the student in using technical language including readability, grammar and use of terminology.
  • The sequence of the report with beginning and logical process to reach a conclusion.
  • Supporting diagrams are not encouraged. However, if used the same should supplement the answer and not replace the need for a broad text answer.
  • The report should not be indexed, itemised or listed.
  • Within reason the candidate will not be penalised for incorrect spelling.
  • A zero mark is only be given in exceptional circumstances. If the student misunderstands the question and gives an answer to a different question, a sympathetic mark may give up to the maximum percentage allow for the report style.

What is the depth of knowledge you must have under each sub topic in each module?

There are three main knowledge levels and learning objectives specified in the EASA Part 66 standards.

Level 1: The student should be familiar with the fundamentals of the subject. The learning objectives are the student should be,

  • Able to explain the subject module using common words and examples.
  • Able to use aviation typical terms.

Level 2: The student should possess a general knowledge on theoretical and practical aspects of the subject and able to apply that knowledge in given situations. The learning objectives are the should be,

  • Able to understand the fundamentals of the subject.
  • Able to explain the subject using, appropriate and typical examples.
  • Able to use mathematical formulae in conjunction with physical laws describing the subject.
  • Able to read and understand sketches, drawings and schematics describing the subject.
  • Able to apply subject knowledge in a practical manner using detailed procedures.

Level 3: The student should possess detailed knowledge on the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject and must be able to combine and apply the separate elements of knowledge in a logical and comprehensive manner. The learning objective are, the student should,

  • Know the theory of the subject and interrelationships with other subjects.
  • Be able to give a detailed description of the subject using theoretical fundamentals and specific examples and understand.
  • Be able to use mathematical formulae related to the subject.
  • Be able to read, understand and prepare sketches, simple drawings and schematics describing the subject.
  • Be able to apply his knowledge in a practical manner using manufacturer's instructions.
  • Be able to interpret results from various sources and measurements and apply corrective action where appropriate.

EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

What is the time duration available for particular subject module exam?

Time durations of particular question paper depends on number of multiple choice questions and essay type questions available in the paper. Each multiple choice question is given 75 seconds to answer and each essay type question is given 20 minutes to answer. Time duration for each module question paper is provided in EASA Part 66 standards. Following table provides the summary of time durations for each module.

Number of Questions for Each Module and Time Durations

Module
Cat A
Cat B1
Cat B2
1
16 MCQ 20 mts
30 MCQ 40 mts
30 MCQ 30 mts
2
30 MCQ 40 mts
50 MCQ 65 mts
50 MCQ 65 mts
3
20 MCQ 25 mts
50 MCQ 65 mts
50 MCQ 65 mts
4
None
20 MCQ 25 mts
40 MCQ 50 mts
5
16 MCQ 20 mts
40 MCQ 50 mts for B1.1 & B1.3, 20 MCQ 25 mts for B1.2 & B1.4
70 MCQ 90 mts
6
50 MCQ 65 mts
70 MCQ 90 mts
60 MCQ 75 mts
7
70 MCQ and 02 Essay 90 mts and 40 mts
80 MCQ and 02 Essay 100 mts and 40 mts
60 MCQ and 02 Essay 75 mts and 40 mts
8
20 MCQ 25 mts
20 MCQ 25 mts
20 MCQ 25 mts
9
20 MCQ and 01 Essay 25 mts and 20 mts
20 MCQ and 01 Essay 25 mts and 20 mts
20 MCQ and 01 Essay 25 mts and 20 mts
10
30 MCQ and 01 Essay 40 mts and 20 mts
40 MCQ and 01 Essay 50 mts and 20 mts
40 MCQ and 01 Essay 50 mts and 20 mts
11A
100 MCQ 125 mts
130 MCQ 165 mts
None
11B
70 MCQ 90 mts
100 MCQ 125 mts
None
12
90 MCQ 115 mts
115 MCQ 145 mts
None
13
None
None
130 MCQ 165 mts
14
None
None
25 MCQ 30 mts
15
60 MCQ 75 mts
90 MCQ 115 mts
None
16
50 MCQ 65 mts
70 McQ 70 mts
None
17
20 MCQ 25 mts
30 MCQ 40 mts
None
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer
EASA Part 66 - The Pathway to Become Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

What is the pass mark?

The pass mark for each module and sub-module multi-choice part of the examination is 75 %. The pass mark for each essay question is 75 % in that the candidates answer must contain 75% of the required key points addressed by the question and no significant error related to any required key point. If either the multi-choice part only or the essay part only is failed, then it is only necessary to reappear for the multi-choice or essay part, as appropriate. No any penalty marking system in correction of multiple-choice question papers.

What is the time period available to pass all the subject modules in particular licence category?

Five year time period.

Strategy for Success

The EASA Part 66 requirements guides the students to obtain requisite knowledge and practical experience for obtaining AML. An aircraft maintenance engineer shall possess sound fundamental knowledge in order to sustain in the industry and to ensure safety in the aviation field. The examination standards in EASA Part 66 is aiming to check the requisite practical and theoretical knowledge of candidates, in aircraft maintenance, in compliance with knowledge levels and leaning objectives specified in EASA Part 66. Therefore, systematic approach is necessary to study and prepare for the examinations. It is important to focus your studies to meet the leaning objectives under each module, sub module and sub topic. Following key points could be used as a guideline to develop further your studies.

  • Have proper understanding about expected knowledge levels and leaning objectives.
  • Have study materials to comply the syllabus, knowledge levels and leaning objectives.
  • Leaning fundamentals is important and should be able to apply that knowledge in given aircraft maintenance situations.
  • Practicing question papers are important but first priority to be given to study the subjects.
  • Practicing past question papers with timing is important as exams are time sensitive.
  • Practicing of answering easy type questions with adequate and correct technical report writing skills is important.
  • Answers for essay type questions should be focused and contain all key points.

EASA Part 66 Licence Frequently asked questions

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