ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

RadioShack Handheld CB Radio with Weather Alert

Updated on May 30, 2009
My TRC-241
My TRC-241
Old Box Design
Old Box Design

Another CB Radio Hub! Time for another Hub about CB radios! Hoo-Ray! I love CB radios, and you do too you just don't realize it yet - That's all. Now let us go over the features of the RadioShack TRC-241 Handheld CB Radio.

Top Keys - On the face of the radio, there are five buttons underneath the LCD screen (which we will go over later). Starting on the left side, the buttons are H/L, BEEP; LIGHT; LOCK/ALERT OFF; CB/WX and CH9/19, SCAN. The H/L means High or Low power. Turn it to Low power by pressing this button once, and return to high power by pressing it again. Hold down this button for 3 seconds and the beep will turn off when you press down buttons. 3 more seconds turns the beep back on. The LIGHT button is obvious - it turns on two greenish lights at the bottom of the screen for use in the dark. When the LOCK/ALERT OFF button is held down for three seconds, it acts as a hold button, locking the keys. Pressing it once turns on and off the weather alert, so that if there is nasty weather headed your direction it will automatically go to the weather station for you. The CB/WX key flips back and forth between the standard 40 CB channels and 7 weather channels. When the WX side is engaged it will automatically scan and find the weather station for your area. The CH9/19 SCAN button pressed once will go straight to channel 9, which is used for emergencies only; twice will lead you directly to channel 19 for those of you who don't know already is the most popular channel and you will always hear the most CB chatter on channel 19. When the auto 9/19 channels are selected, the numbers will flash on the screen, to get out of this mode press the button twice if you are on 9 and once more if you are on 19. The second half of this key will scan all forty channels for a signal. Once the signal stops the scan continues. To cancel scanning, just press the channel up or down button on the side of the radio.

Side Keys - The left side of the radio houses three buttons. PTT (Push To Talk), Channel Up and Channel Down. The PTT button is pretty self explanitory - you push and hold down the button to talk to other CB users. However make sure you have the button fully pressed before you begin speaking, make sure you hold down the button while transmitting (otherwise what you say will be cut in half and hard to understand), and be sure to finish talking completely before letting go of the button. The channel up and down keys will scroll through the channels one by one either way you desire. Press it the number of times it takes to reach the channel you want, or hold it down for finding the channel faster and easier.

Top - On the top of the CB radio is the Antenna Jack, Squelch, Volume/Power, and Mic and Speaker inputs. The antenna jack is a BNC connecter that works with the 8" rubber ducky antenna included, or you can purchase a BNC to PL-259 adapter so you can use the radio with a standard CB antenna for astonishingly improved reception and range. To the right of the antnenna input is the squelch knob. Turning this fully clockwise cuts out all of the signal the CB is receiving leaving you with no reception. Turning this fully counter-clockwise lets in the total signal, however there is a terribly annoying static buzz that makes using the radio unpleasant. The best way to set the squelch knob is starting with it fully counter-clockwise and turning it clockwise until the second it stops humming. This lets in the most signal without being unpleasant. The volume knob is simple. Turn the volume down until it clicks will turn the radio off completely.The MIC and SPK inputs are for external speakers for more volume, or an extnernal microphone.

Screen - The easy to read and understand LCD screen on this puppy displays the CB channel or weather channel you are on in big bold numbers on the left side of the screen. On the right, there is a meter to show you how much signal you are getting. Under the signal meter, there is the battery level display. Under the channel number in the far left corner there is a P. SAVE, or power save feature that comes on automatically when there is no activity on the radio, thus saving your battery life. The battery life is outstanding in the first place however. To the right of this, "SCAN" will appear when you are in scan mode. After SCAN, the musical note means the beep is on when you press buttons, and then the key symbol signifies the locked mode.

Other Features - On the back side of the TRC-241 CB radio, there is a belt clip, for hands free listening and transportation. To the right of the screen on the side, there is a loop to put the included wrist strap. There are two separate options for powering the CB radio, both of which are included in the box. The first is a rechargable battery pack that is charged with a power cord (included), and the second is a AA battery pack that holds 8 batteries. The AA battery case is a tad bit smaller than the rechargable one. I have heard people say that this CB radio seems heavy to them, I think it's fine - it feels sturdy. I think the rechargable battery pack is what makes people say it's a little heavy.

My Personal TRC-241 - I love my CB radio. I use it all the time. I have been in love with CB radios ever since I saw Smokey and the Bandit, and once I showed my friends that movie and showed them my CB radio they all want one too! The 8" rubber ducky antenna included is okay for standing outside, but it sucks inside the car. The second I stick the end of the antenna out of the car window on the highway I hear people talking. Obviously, holding a CB radio out of a car window going 65mph while driving, AND try to talk (let alone hear talking over all the wind noise) at the same time is not very bright. So I bought a 27" RadioShack antenna to stick on the top of my car. To do this, I purchased a BNC to PL-259 adapter at the same time so I could hook the antenna to the rubber duck antenna input. I also have an old antenna that's about 40-ish inches tall from around the 70's and bought another BNC to PL-259 adapter for that too. Even if I do not have the CB hooked up to either antenna, I always have at least one antenna on top of my car just be cause it looks cool.

The Final Verdict - Would I recommend this CB radio? YES. However, make sure it fits your needs and what you will use it for. If you are planning on keeping your CB in one car the whole time, then this would be really good! Although, you might want to check out mobile CB radios that install into your cars circuit board. I do not own a mobile CB because I take my CB from car to car, and even on mission trips for entertainment on long 12 hour rides in vans. Even if you wanted to keep a CB in your car at all times, but don't have room for a permanent mobile CB, this is great because it is compact and fits into glove boxes and consoles with ease. I highly suggest you check this CB out if you have been searching for one. Fantastic purchase!

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Thomas 

      7 years ago

      Another comment about CB hand helds or walkie talkies as they were once called, years ago(1964 or 1965) when I first got into CB, I purchased a Midland 2 watt 3 channel CB hand held not a bad rado in fact it was built like a tank, solid metal case and a telescopic whip antenna , my best contact from my house was about 2 miles away to a mobile station in a store's parting lot, I did on several times take the hand held with me when my family and I visited Desert Hot Springs California, I would hike to the top of a hill and try and work some DX, heard a lot of cross country DX, but only once worked a DX station, a station going by the handle "Desert Oasis" over in Blythe which was about 60 miles from Desert Hot Springs, 2 watts on a CB walkie talkie ! Not too bad ! Now adays you can on occasion find used CB hand helds at yard sales dirt cheap as so few people use them anymore ! They were real battery eaters, as the 5 watt units took 10 AA batteries, amateur radio operators would buy used CB hand helds just to convert them to 10 meters !

    • profile image

      Thomas 

      7 years ago

      If any of you buy a Cb hand held with the weather band do make sure that you can purchase a whip antenna that can be attached to the hand held as the rubber duck on a CB is almost worthless and use a piece of thin wire about 108 inches long attached below the antenna where it mates with the radio this will act as a ground plane giving you a far better signal than just using the rubber duck antenna, and using nicad AA batteries give out less power than alkaline batteries my own opinion don't waste your money on a CB hand held put the money towards the "Flame thower" you will get more use from that rig !The best hand held radios are the amateur radio hand helds such as my VX-5 that has 6 meters, 2 meters, 440, recieves shortwave, AM,FM, weather band, police calls,on 6 meters one repeater that I can hit which is in Prescott I can talk to stations in California, Los Angeles and half-way up the California coast, the problem with CB, short range sometimes is not dependable and a CB low powered held-held is nearly worthless unless you are on top of a mountain , a building or out at sea ! Just something to think about !

    • profile image

      Thomas 

      7 years ago

      I have owned several CB handhelds, all I can say is save your money ! First of all the rubber duck antenna that comes with the radio is next to worthless to really get out with one of these handhelds, in the car they must be connected to a mobile antenna, in your house connected to a base antenna, if you are atop a mountain then you can get fairly good coverage, but in a large city maybe two miles if you are lucky with the rubber duck antenna ! Want a hand held with real coverage plus the weather band ? Get a tech license and get a 2 meter FM these all cover (the newer radios)the weather channels, with my 2 meter radio I have programed the weather channel, plus all of my local repeaters that I can hit from here in Sedona, giving me coverage of nearly 300 miles !I do wish one day that there will be a 40 channel CB hand held that operates not only AM but also SSB, you would have a greater range ! I once had a 10 meter SSB hand held called the 10 meter DX handy(amateur radio) and with the radio's whip antenna,I worked stations all over the U.S.,even Hawaii and once Japan using only 2 watts !

    • parkerk393 profile imageAUTHOR

      parkerk393 

      9 years ago from Arlington, Texas

      Thanks! I'm glad you enjoyed it. This is a great CB radio.

    • profile image

      bilk0407 

      9 years ago

      GREAT Hub. Thanks for all the info. I'm on my way to Radio Shack now!!!

    • parkerk393 profile imageAUTHOR

      parkerk393 

      9 years ago from Arlington, Texas

      You should get one! This one is great.

    • johnb0127 profile image

      johnb0127 

      9 years ago from TX

      Very nice, informative hub. I really want a CB now!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)