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Samsung Series 6000 and Series 7000 LED TV

Updated on July 7, 2009

Luxia Series 6000 and Series 7000 TVs

Televisions as with all technology constantly move forward. Bigger, better, brighter, more realistic, HD read, Full HD, flat screen, LCD, Plasma, thinner and now LED. It’s the nature of the beast that television manufacturers want us to upgrade our televisions as fast as they roll off the production line. Never mind that your TV could last you a good 10 years, you are marketed at, you need the latest device. You will be cool if you buy the newest TV. And what could be newer and better than Samsung Series 6000 and Series 7000 LED, also known as the Samsung Luxia Televisions? Nothing. That’s what!

The problem is, are LED TVs a reality yet? Samsung would have you believe so, but their competitors are not so sure. I’ll let you decide, after you’ve read through. See, true LED TVs are more commonly known as OLED TVs are an emerging technology. To be an OLED TV, you screen would need to use only LEDs (Light Emmiting Diodes) to create the picture on your television. If you buy yourself a new television today, chances are it is using an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display). LCD televisions are the most widely produced TVs at the moment and basically, they work by filtering white light. LED displays, work differently; they use an individual LED to represent a single pixel on the screen. Unfortunately, currently, LEDs are much too large to use in consumer televisions so they tend to be kept for large displays such as those in sports stadiums or large commercial locations where the viewer is sitting far enough away from the display to be able to see the image.

Is the Luxia range a true OLED Television?

Samsung’s Series 6 and Series 7 LED TV don’t actually use LEDs for each pixel. Instead, they are still using an LCD display panel but with LED backlighting. This means that the LEDs are the actual light source for the TV rather than the usual Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps used in most LCD displays. In most modern displays, some of the biggest problems are down to the backlighting – these include greying out of black levels in your picture which is caused by the fact that with CCFL backlit panels, a single backlight needs to be shining at all times – this causes some bleeding of light into pixels that should be black, causing the greying out that is so common in the current crop of televisions. This is also the cause of motion blur, because the backlight doesn’t scan, instead it presents a series of static images. Samsung’s idea, instead of continually refining the technology is to do away with the problem altogether – using LEDs as backlights allows the light source to be more finely controlled since you can switch off all light in portions of the screen that should be dark, creating more convincing black levels and better picture quality. At the same time, the LEDs can “scan” properly, creating proper motion and doing away with motion blur traditionally associated with LCDs. The other great advantage and probably the biggest technology leap here is that Samsung have placed the LEDs in the side of the frame of the television rather than the back, so it allows the TV to be thinner and so more aesthetically pleasing.

Why you should buy Samsungs Luxia Televisions

So is Samsung just using marketing gimmicks to try to get a jump on the game? It is clear that we are not looking at what would traditionally be described as an LED television, rather it is an LCD display that uses LEDs as its light source. Perhaps their marketing line for the Samsung Series 6000 LED TV puts it most succinctly:

Normal televisions use a fluorescent lamp backlight to produce an image. Samsung LED TVs create images by using white, light emitting diodes (LED). It’s the same technology found in laptop screens. This transformative technology has finally made exceptionally slim TVs a reality.

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    • profile image

      Slevin 

      5 years ago

      This is Samsung is so awesome! I didn’t think an image this clean and crisp was even possible; I certainly haven’t seen it on any of the other three HD sets I had before buying this one. I work at DISH, and a coworker of mine has this same Sammy, and when I saw it, I knew I had to have one. I just upgraded my family to the DISH Hopper, which gives us HD to four different sets, and we wanted to fully take advantage of it. My in-laws moved in a few months back, and there have been problems missing TV shows due to DVR timer conflicts ever since. Having the Hopper hooked up to four TVs, including the Samsung, has ended that problem.

    • profile image

      Mark 

      6 years ago

      Samsung sells CRAP knowingly! The have dozens of models that are covered under their Capacitor Settlement but they continue to build with the same shoddy materials and not taking care of the issue on newer models. I'll NEVER purchase any Samsung product ever again!

    • profile image

      jimgou 

      6 years ago

      exw ti seira 7000 kai mou anoigokleini xerete tipota gia ayto to provlima

    • profile image

      preroll 

      8 years ago

      @brent,

      I have never heard of any company sending a cheque back to a customer, especially for a power supply failure. They would rather replace it with another one, then another until you got fed up and upgrade to another model.

    • profile image

      Brian 

      8 years ago

      I have the Samsung 6000LED 55" TV and it is the most increadible television your eyes will ever see, and yet, the 7000 series is even better. I purchased mine in May 2009 and it works perfectly. I Highly recommend this product

    • profile image

      brent 

      8 years ago

      I have had no problem with customer service with samsung. I did have a samsung tv that had an issue with the power supply that couldn't be fixed in a reasonable time frame. They told me to just keep the old tv if I wanted to and they sent me a check for the full amount of the TV. I was able to get an upgrade from a 40 inch to a 46 inch tv because the prices went down so much. In the mean time, my old tv has been fixed, so now i have two TVs for the price of one. I will buy samsung products from here on out!

    • profile image

      brent 

      8 years ago

      I have had no problem with customer service with samsung. I did have a samsung tv that had an issue with the power supply that couldn't be fixed in a reasonable time frame. They told me to just keep the old tv if I wanted to and they sent me a check for the full amount of the TV. I was able to get an upgrade from a 40 inch to a 46 inch tv because the prices went down so much. In the mean time, my old tv has been fixed, so now i have two TVs for the price of one. I will buy samsung products from here on out!

    • profile image

      maltyful 

      8 years ago

      SAMSUNG TVS ARE JUNK!!

      Put "samsung tv clicking" into a google search and read how they burn out and turn to TOAST just after their warranty's expire.

      Read about thousands of samsung customers that were told more or less by samsung customer service YOUR OUT OF LUCK SUCKER.

      Do the searches so you won't be the next Samsung Sucker.

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