ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Technology»
  • Materials & Industrial Technology

The Fascinating World of Walking Machines

Updated on September 28, 2013

Practical walking machines exist and perform various roles

The Timberjack walking machine has six articulated legs and can easily negotiate forested terrain, where no truck, car or even helicopter can go.
The Timberjack walking machine has six articulated legs and can easily negotiate forested terrain, where no truck, car or even helicopter can go.
This is the Timberjack walking machine at work.
This is the Timberjack walking machine at work.
This is an experimental 8 legged walking machine.
This is an experimental 8 legged walking machine.
The four legged walking machine has so far proven to be unpractical due to issues of balance. A stabilizing system has to be developed for this lumbering giant. Videos show that it walks slowly and furtively.
The four legged walking machine has so far proven to be unpractical due to issues of balance. A stabilizing system has to be developed for this lumbering giant. Videos show that it walks slowly and furtively.
Interestingly, Honda has had less trouble building a two legged walking machine, or robot that can negotiate stars and run.
Interestingly, Honda has had less trouble building a two legged walking machine, or robot that can negotiate stars and run.
Here is a photo of Asimo the robot running a race.
Here is a photo of Asimo the robot running a race.
This is Asimo running with some children. Walking machines and their humanoid counterparts, robots are now a scientific fact of life.
This is Asimo running with some children. Walking machines and their humanoid counterparts, robots are now a scientific fact of life.

Over the decades, the walking machine has leaped from the imagination of science fiction to the world of practical reality.

They are becoming increasingly abundant and take on forms from the experimental eight, six, four and two legged varieties. They range in size from the small, toy versions to the monstrous. These are the walking machines that can negotiate any raw territory, like forests where the lumbering machine (no pun intended) working at a logging operation, to Asimo, the fully autonomous Japanese robot that can walk up and down stairs and do a lot of other two legged human activities. This exciting technology can be used for the benefit of humanity, but it also has a dark side, as instruments of war and terror. They are already in use by industry, in entertainment, experiment and some say, now in warfare, but that is yet to be verified. All other considerations are real.

The basic components of a fully functional piloted or autonomous walking machine consists of a computer controller, hydraulics, an engine, mechanical parts, fully articulated legs and feet, flexible joints and springs and controls for a human operator in the larger machines. The concept of the walking machine is to function like their biological counterparts, but as a true electromechanical machine using metal and manufactured components. Many studies have been done to find the best configuration for a walking machine. Thus far, the six and two legged variety have been the most successful and are deployed in the field.

The computer control is essential for the timing the resonant rhythm needed to work the legs, keep the machine balanced and to prevent tipping. Coupled with sensors in the robot type, it allows the machine to negotiate uneven terrain. In the six legged “Timberjack Walking Machine”, the pilot has limited control of the machine, whereas the on board computer makes the legs function in correct sequence to prevent tipping and to negotiate the complex terrain of the forest. The pilot can steer the machine and use the log cutting and stripping apparatus to prepare raw logs for the lumber industry. Asimo the robot, developed by Honda, is a fully autonomous robot and bipedal walking machine. Another bipedal walking machine, that is piloted, was seen in the second movie of the “Aliens” series. This is a real machine rented to the move set. It's function is primarily to magnify human muscle power for cramped loading and unloading operations in warehouses where heavy objects like engines are handled.

The hydraulic system is the “muscle” of the walking machine. The fluid is delivered through hoses to bi-directional hydraulic rams that activate the legs. Pumps the move the fluid are electronically wired to the computer that decides which pumps operate when and in which direction the fluid flows to extend or flex the particular limbs in the correct sequence. It is equivalent to muscle, but works by expansion rather than contraction as seen in muscle. The rams in the best designs are incorporated into the legs themselves. The feet incorporate shock absorbers and are semi flexible so as to handle a wide variety of terrain and do not as a rule have any hydraulics. They do however, have sensors that operate as a feedback system to the computer that operates the hydraulic legs.

The engine operates the pumps that drives the hydraulics and in the case of the Timberjack, the harvester as well. The engine can be fully electrical, such as found in the “Spider” a solar powered research walking machine based in Vancouver, BC, or it can incorporate a diesel engine to power both pumps via a generator or directly as well as other tools that may be part of the machine.

Mechanical parts are all the legs and joints that are designed to have as much articulation as possible so that the whole machine can operate efficiently in the complex environment. It also consists of all the hydraulic rams that are coupled with the legs, the hoses that deliver or remove hydraulic oil, the complex valves and the pumps.


Vancouver, BC boasts its own 8 legged walking machine

The legs are often custom designed, at least in the beginning, to function for a particular machine. The legs are designed to function in at least two axes; up and down and side to side; for maximum manoeuvrability. The feet are often very simple, rounded pads with shock absorbers and sensors to give the computer feedback. Creating articulated joints like we see in the human hip or shoulders has been a trick to mimic and this is often done with two rotating mechanical joints positioned in 90 degree orientation to give the maximum flexibility. Some machines incorporate springs as shock absorbers, but they are seldom used in the legs themselves.

The controls are often configured through two joysticks for the machines where maximum pilot input is required. Walking machines are not configured like a car, because the two are completely different in function. A walking machine can go where no car can ever be coaxed. When was the last time you parallel parked by moving the car sideways? The walking machine can handle this task easily. Cars cannot negotiate a field of boulders, whereas the walking machine can. A walking machine can navigate through boggy or spongy terrain where a car or truck would get hopelessly mired.

Six legged or two legged, the functions are virtually identical. Only the designs are different. Asimo, the robot is a fully autonomous two legged walking machine. Timberjack is a piloted walking machine designed to do a specific job. Military ones that are likely in existence, are designed for a host of operations.

Other than this, walking machines have been the substance of science fiction. It started with H. G. Wells “War of the Worlds” where Mars seeks to conquer the Earth using machines that have three flexible legs. From there, many variations of walking machines were conceived such as those in Star Wars “The Empire Strikes Back” and the “Terminator” series. They are now a reality and the day is not far off when they will be commonplace.

References

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CD2V8GFqk_Y

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM5H0_Y-mPc]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mecha

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASIMO


Asimo performs and is almost human like in action!

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • lightning john profile image

      lightning john 7 years ago from Florida

      Ah yes, I've watched a program about those naughty - bots? Really strange I had forgot about that one. I do remember them saying they were over 6000.00 for one, on a HBO documentary. The Japanese are always current or ahead on technology.

    • syzygyastro profile image
      Author

      William J. Prest 7 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      That one is still a bit off. However they have a close mimic in a silicon based skin that can be made to feel like the real thing complete with warmth. There is a whole line of erotic based robotics under development, which unfortunately can't be openly discussed in this forum. Meanwhile, the Japanese are developing a type of robot that will build a lunar colony. These are quite large and weigh 600 to 700 kilos apiece. Teams of them are planned to build a lunar colony slated for 2020.

    • lightning john profile image

      lightning john 7 years ago from Florida

      That Asimo is great! Do you think they will ever create the human type machines with actual living type outer skin, like the movies?

      I really enjoy reading your hubs. Thanks for writing.

    • syzygyastro profile image
      Author

      William J. Prest 7 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      Asimo has been around at least several years. Admittedly, the first version was awkward, slow and clumsy, but since then, the model has been improved and is much more human like, able to do all sorts of human activities. Toyota is now working on a commercial for sale robot and I understand some are already on the market, but at a high price as there are still relatively few.

    • Robwrite profile image

      Rob 7 years ago from Oviedo, FL

      I never thought I'd see real two-legged robots walking around in my lifetime. Wow!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is used to quickly and efficiently deliver files such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisements has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)