ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Technology»
  • Computers & Software

Best Gaming Solid State Drives for the Money 2016

Updated on December 12, 2016

Will a SSD Improve Gaming Performance?

If you're thinking about getting a solid state drive for your gaming rig or PC, then don't second guess yourself. It's a huge performance booster in terms of program or game load times.

This literally makes everything you do on your computer just a little bit faster. Those seconds, over time, add up to hours or even days if you use your computer a lot.

What about FPS?

That being said a solid state drive won't substantially improve your FPS. The frames per second that your computer can display depend more heavily upon your graphics card and processor and ensuring you have enough ram.

Typically, SATA III ports are marked in this greyish white color. This particular motherboard has additional SATA III ports, in dark blue, which run off a Marvell controller rather than the chip.
Typically, SATA III ports are marked in this greyish white color. This particular motherboard has additional SATA III ports, in dark blue, which run off a Marvell controller rather than the chip.

Choosing a Solid State Drive:

Pay Attention to Read and Write Speeds.

Technical specifications for solid state drives should list a read and a write speed. Today, even inexpensive solid state drives have high read speeds, but typically solid state drives with high write speeds are sold at a bit of a premium.

The truth is you may not need a solid state drive with a fast write time. Occasionally you'll write a file when you download a new game, but for the most part write speeds won't cause you a noticeable bottleneck. On the other hand, if you do write-intensive tasks like photo or video editing, then you'll want to make finding a solid state drive with high write speeds a priority.

SATA III Speeds Vs. SATA II

Modern motherboards and SSD all come with SATA III support. However, if you're upgrading from an older computer, then your computer may not support the full SATA speeds. Take a look at your motherboard to find out whether it supports Sata III.

Either way I'd highly recommend you go with a SATA III supported solid state drive. They aren't that much more expensive and the older SATA II drives you'll come across are generally inferior to the newer products that have come out in 2014.

What Capacity of SSD do you need?

It's not easy to go from having over a terabyte of storage to 250GB, but with SSD storage costs you may find yourself trying to do just that. That being said just because you get a solid state drive doesn't mean you have to completely rid yourself of the hard drive you'd been using previously. Using it as a secondary drive for your photos and videos is advisable. If you don't want to do that, then consider using an external hard drive. The third option is just to purchase enough storage for all your previous files. There are few solid state drives on the market with this type of capacity. Luckily, several recent options seem to be more affordable then previous generation models.

4 Fast and Budget-Friendly Solid State Drives for 2016

5 stars for Samsung 840 EVO

Fastest Solid State Drives for the Money in 2016

Samsung 850 EVO-Series

It's amazing how quickly Samsung has taken over the solid state drive market. The attention they're getting is well-deserved as their products are not only reliable but fast and affordable.

The 850 series from Samsung continues to pave the way. It has capacities for everything from 250GB all the way to 4TB. (Smaller capacities are available with their 750 series.)

Technical Details:

Read speeds for this line are 540MB/s while sustained sequential write speeds are 520MB/s. In addition, it comes with a 5-year warranty.

If you can pick it up for significantly cheaper than this year's model, then you'll still be satisfied with Samsung's 2012 840 model.
If you can pick it up for significantly cheaper than this year's model, then you'll still be satisfied with Samsung's 2012 840 model.

Samsung 840 Standard Series

Prior to have released its EVO series Samsung released its standard 840 series. This series of solid state drives has been one of the most popular since its release because of its inexpensive cost and quick read speeds.

If you don't quick write speeds, then you may be able to save a little bit of money here by going with Samsung's previous generation model.

Additional Specifications:

The Standard 840 series featured read sustained read speeds of 530MB/s with write speeds of 120MB/s for the 120GB capacity, 250 MB/s for the 250GB capacity and, 330 MB/s for the 500GB capacity.

Crucial M500 Series Solid State Drive

Another really solid option to add to this list is the Crucial MX300 series. Like the 850 EVO series the MX300 has larger capacities and is available at up to 2TB of storage capacity. With the current market, this particular drive is on par with the Samsung 850 EVO in terms of price and read and write speeds, but offers additional capacity for the price.

It uses the Marvell controller, has a mean time before failure of 1.2 million hours, and comes with a standard 3 year parts and labor warranty.

Final Thoughts:

While some might prefer the 850 EVO if both of these products were at the same price, the M500 X300 has great durability, performance, and costs less than the market leader. It's one of the better options available right now.

Crucial M4 Series

Like Samsung's 840 series the previous generation of the M500 was also extremely popular. High read speeds, low costs, and Crucial's reputation has carried the m4 to the forefront of the market. Available in sizes from 64GB to 512GB you should only go for the M4 at this point in time if you can find a substantial discount. In comparison to Samsung's new Evo or the M500, you should try to find a substantial discount.

Overall this is a good product if you can get it on the cheap and if you don't need to concern yourself with write speeds.

Interactive Solid State Drive Poll

Which SSD is Your favorite?

See results

© 2013 Brandon Hart

Solid State Drive Open Commentary

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.