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Transformer Cooling Methods

Updated on January 2, 2014

Losses in the transformer are of the order of 1% of its full load kW rating. These losses get converted in the heat thereby the temperature of the windings, core, oil and the tank rises. The heat is dissipated from the transformer tank and the radiator in to the atmosphere. Transformer cooling helps in maintaining the temperature rise of various parts within permissible limits. In case of Transformer, Cooling is provided by the circulation of the oil. Transformer Oil acts as both insulating material and also cooling medium in the transformer. For small rating transformers heat is removed from the transformer by natural thermal convection. For large rating transformers this type of cooling is not sufficient, for such applications forced cooling is used.

As size and rating of the transformer increases, the losses increase at a faster rate. So oil is circulated in the transformer by means of oil pumps. Within the tank the oil is made to flow through the space between the coils of the windings.

Several different combination of natural, forced, air, oil transformer cooling methods are available. The choice of picking the right type of transformer cooling method for particular appilcatiion depends on the factors such as rating, size, and location.

Transformer Cooling Methods

Different Transformer Cooling methods are:

Air Cooling For Dry Type Transformers:

  • Air natural Type (A.N.)
  • Air Forced type (A.F.)

Cooling For Oil Immersed Transformers:

  • Oil Natural Air Natural Type (O.N.A.N.)
  • Oil Natural Air Forced Type (O.N.A.F.)
  • Oil Forced Air Natural Type (O.F.A.N.)
  • Oil Forced Air Forced Type (O.F.A.F.)

Oil immersed Water Cooling:

  • Oil Natural Water Forced (O.N.W.F.)
  • Oil Forced Water Forced (O.F.W.F.)

Air Natural Transformer Cooling:

This type of Transformer Cooling method applies to dry type transformer of small rating. The surrounding air in the vicinity of the transformer is used for cooling. Small transformers below 25kVA can be readily cooled by air natural cooling. However air natural cooling is also used for large dry type transformers. Cooling takes place by convection air currents.

Air Forced Transformer Cooling:

This type of cooling is provided for dry type transformers. The air is forced on to the tank surface to increase the rate of heat dissipation. The fans are switched on when the temperature of the winding increases above permissible level.

Oil Natural Air Natural Transformer Cooling:

This type of Transformer cooling is widely used for oil filled transformers up to about 30MVA. In Natural cooling, the oil in the tans gets heated due to the heat generated in the core and windings. The hot Oil flows upward and the cold Oil comes down according to the principle of convection. The oil flows in the transformer tank by the principle of natural convection hence this type of cooling is called Oil Natural Cooling. Heat is transferred from core and transformer windings to the oil and the heated oil is cooled by the natural air. Cooling area is increased by providing the cooling tubes.

Oil Natural Air Natural Cooling Transformer
Oil Natural Air Natural Cooling Transformer

Oil natural Air Forced Transformer Cooling:

In this method, air fans are mounted near the Transformer and the forced air is directed on to the cooling tubes to increase the rate of cooling. The fans are provided with automatic starting. When the temperature of the oil and windings increases above a permissible value the thermostats switch on cooling fans. This happens during heavy load condition and during higher ambient temperatures.

 In higher rating transformers where the heat dissipation is difficult this type of cooling is used. Fans are used to forced and air blast on radiators. Forced air cooling increases the heat dissipation rate. In this type of cooling oil circulates by natural convection and the blast of air is directed towards the better heat dissipation rate.

Oil Natural and Air Forced Transformer Cooling
Oil Natural and Air Forced Transformer Cooling

Oil Forced Air Forced Transformer Cooling:

Transformers above 60 MVA employ a combination of Forced Oil and Forced Air Cooling. Oil Natural Air Forced type of cooling is not adequate to remove the heat caused by the losses which is approximately equal to 1% of the transformer rating (0.6MW). In case of Forced Oil and Forced air cooling system a separate cooler is mounted away from the transformer tank. This cooler is connected to the transformer with pipes at the bottom and the top. The oil is circulated from the transformer to the cooler through the pump. The cooler is provided with the fans which blast air on the cooling tubes. This type of cooling is provided for the higher rating transformers available at the Substations and Power Stations.

Oil Forced Air Forced Transformer Cooling
Oil Forced Air Forced Transformer Cooling

Oil Forced Water Forced Transformer Cooling:

This type of cooling system needs a heat exchanger in which the heat of the transformer oil is given to the cooling water. The cooling water is taken away and cooled in separate coolers. The oil is forced through the heat exchanger. The oil pump pumps the oil from transformer to the het exchanger though the top pipes. Oil from the heat exchanger is pumped back to the transformer through the bottom pipe.

This type of cooling Is provided for very large transformers which have ratings of some hundreds of MVA (Generating Transformer will have very high rating and rating equal to the rating of the generator). This type of transformers is used in large substations and power plants.

Oil Forced Water Forced Transformer Cooling
Oil Forced Water Forced Transformer Cooling

Comments

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    • profile image

      Abdul Majeed 

      4 years ago

      very nic dear But

      what you know abaut cooling KNAN method

    • profile image

      sam 

      5 years ago

      hello!

      what you know abaut cooling KNAN method ?

    • profile image

      suneel 

      5 years ago

      thank you for giving information &it is very use full

    • profile image

      jimmy 

      5 years ago

      nice one

    • profile image

      msdee 

      5 years ago

      usefull for sure. i really grasp so much hey.

    • profile image

      mahmoud 

      5 years ago

      like about topic

    • profile image

      Moh'd Alsmadi 

      6 years ago

      Excellent Article

    • profile image

      rifan 

      6 years ago

      thanx man, it is usefull

    • profile image

      SYED RIAZ ALI SHAH BUKHARI 

      6 years ago

      thanks it is very nice & easily method to understand

      SYED RIAZ ALI BUKHARI

      riazbukari@yahoo.com

    • profile image

      Raj 

      6 years ago

      Thanx n very nice and easily method to understand

    • profile image

      devendra sen 

      6 years ago

      thanks it is very usefull information

    • profile image

      Prasath eee king 

      6 years ago

      It's very useful and nic explanations:-)

    • profile image

      Brett Hunter 

      6 years ago

      If there are two pumps on the system, two heat exchangers, should both be pumping towards the heat exchangers, or could you have a system where the oil circulates at th bottom.

    • profile image

      saravana 

      6 years ago

      thanks for the information

    • profile image

      shiyamu 

      6 years ago

      very useful but diagram is missing.

    • profile image

      JAYAKUMAR DEEE BE ME 

      6 years ago

      very usfull in the information

    • profile image

      jagan DEEE BE 

      6 years ago

      not in the diagram the more reference in the book

    • profile image

      jug 

      6 years ago

      it will be more nice if it is with 2D pictures with explanations

    • profile image

      bhagat 

      6 years ago

      hey friend is three phase delta to star supply step down or step up.

    • profile image

      harikr93@gmail.com 

      6 years ago

      why is it not all the topics described ...???

    • profile image

      Hemanth 

      6 years ago

      If you don't mine can you specify the temperature for different transformer cooling methods like for air dry natural cooling will have certain temp change right that one..........

    • profile image

      No2nunu Amahle 

      6 years ago

      I would like 2 gv a thank 2 d hub pages,it realy hlp m in dung m transfrmers assignment,rise up

    • profile image

      Syabonga Blose 

      6 years ago

      I would like to thank you for providing with correct information which it did help me to complete my assignment on transformers.keep it up with good work!!!

    • profile image

      kumaresh .m 

      6 years ago

      mm k super

    • profile image

      Ruskin 

      6 years ago

      I want to power point Present of Cooling system to Transformer.

      ruskin016@gmail.com

    • profile image

      prakash 

      6 years ago

      more reference with diagram

    • profile image

      papu 

      6 years ago

      lunnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

    • profile image

      Shane 

      7 years ago

      Isn't oil which is forced through a cooler given the letter D, so that should be ODAF for the paragraph Oil Forced Air Forced Transformer Cooling, where a separate cooler is used? Not 100% sure, just asking, cheers

    • profile image

      John 

      7 years ago

      Still wrong, should be 0.6MW.

      ;o)

    • kiran111 profile imageAUTHOR

      kiran111 

      7 years ago

      Thanks S. Tivayki, I corrected the mistake. Iam very Thankful to you...

    • profile image

      S. Tivayki 

      7 years ago

      Thanks again for this very useful hub.

      I just want to correct a statement which you may have missed. For oil forced air forced cooling 1% of 60MVA does not contribute to 6kW.

      Keep up the good work!

    • stars439 profile image

      stars439 

      7 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

      You know what your talking about. Your knowledge is good. GBY.

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