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Why I don't like WordPress

Updated on February 20, 2015
TessSchlesinger profile image

Globetrotter, author, and thinker with interests in environment, minimalism, health, dancing, architecture, décor, politics, and science.

WordPress Basics

Wordpress is a Content Management System (CMS). This means that someone used another coding language (PHP) to write little bits for your use so that you didn’t have to do the complicated coding – e.g. a tab for a menu or a particular font or a table. Instead of having to write the code for the table yourself, you can find a ‘plug in’ for that particular table, add it to your blog/site, and there you have a table within minutes. The WordPress CMS also uses bits of CSS, HTML, and Javascript.

General Disadvantages of Content Management Systems

The problem with all CMS’ is that if you can’t find the exact style of table or item you want, that you have to know enough of the coding language (PHP) to be able to rewrite it or fix it. And if you know enough to rewrite it or fix it, then you know enough to design the site from scratch anyway. It’s a lot quicker to write your own code than to fix someone else’s. That’s because, in order to make sure that there are no conflicts, you more or less have to know what the limits of the CMS package are. If you insert something into the wrong place, the site may not work properly!

WordPress is behind the times!

Untidy coding when you can't find the right template

Imagine if you wrote the following sentence, “At restaurant, I went to eat, sat on pretty chair, and opened the door.” That would read very differently to “I opend the door at the restaurant, sat on a pretty chair, and then ate.” The first is very difficult to read and to understand what is meant. It works the same way with code. In order for code to be easy to read (and fix), it needs to be written in a certain order. The problem with all CMS software is that because one is inserting bits and pieces of code into various places, the code is not in an optimal order. The same happens with Dreamweaver, by the way.

There are other alternatives to WordPress.

HTML5 vs WordPress
HTML5 vs WordPress

WordPress is difficult to learn

Yes, it is. If you are only going to be writing a blog on the accepted WordPress blogsite, it doesn’t matter. Your needs are met. But if you want something more, it’s a helluve lot more difficult to learn WordPress than to learn PHP. Let me draw an analogy here. If you learn the alphabet, you can write any word. However, if you had to learn the dictionary without learning the alphabet, it would be a lot more difficult. And, ironically, you couldn’t be as creative as you could be if you just knew the original language it was written in. WordPress can get very, very complicated!

WordPress Tutorials

Don’t’ ask me why, but technical writers might understand the technicalities, but explaining them in such a way that even a fool can understand them is not their forte. Using jargon (words created for a particular discipline) is fine when everybody is familiar with them; it’s not so fine when they aren’t. It’s next to impossible to be a good tutorial writer when the writer is using jargon without explaining what the word means. Jargon and easy to understand tutorials are incompatible. So learning WordPress is really difficult. I suppose that’s why various schools run courses on it. :)

Help Desk for WordPress? Nooooo...

WordPress does not provide any Help Desk to sort the issues. That means one either approaches someone else who uses it and hopes they really do know what they are talking about, or one struggles through. I gave up a long time ago. I know when something is worth the effort and when it is not. Then, again, I can code.

WordPress not user friendly

When comparing WordPress to virtually any content writing site for user friendliness, the content writing site wins every single time. On WordPress, it’s anybody’s guess as to what it all means.

Why I don't like WordPress

I don’t like WordPress because I have never found a template that works for me. I don’t like WordPress because while I can read HTML and CSS, I can’t read PHP. So it means if something isn’t working, I can’t go in and fix it up. I also don’t like WordPress because I’ve been spoilt by Content Writing sites which have a far better grasp of what writers need. Of course, content writing sites haven’t got the whole story either.

If you're going to learn a language (just to code your own writing site), I would start with HTML5 and CSS3, and when you have a handle on that, do JQuery. Be sure it's HTML5 because other versions of HTML are dated.

Your opinion of WordPress

Does it work for you?

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So what am I looking for in a writing site?

I’m looking for a website that has a box where I can insert small bits of code (so, for example, I can take advantage of the Amazon free giveaway promotion and generate business that way). I am looking for a site where the index provides my articles and stores in the order I want them. And, of course, I am looking for a site which appeals to my aesthetic sense! Of course, I would also like lots of other writers around. That’s because size matters on the web. Getting traffic to one’s own site requires that one markets instead of write!

© 2015 Tessa Schlesinger

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