ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Wireless future

Updated on August 20, 2014

Wireless

Wires are the lifeblood of modern societies. It is impossible to imagine about a contemporary society without wires. Electrical wires, undersea cables, telephone cables, and all other forms of wires- you name it and you’ll realize how important it is for your daily life.

But wait, what about the condition of wire-meshes?

I don’t know about other countries, but in India it is a mess. Just look up anywhere for a post and you’ll, without doubt, realize that it is really a mess (not mesh). The single post (barring the electrical naked-wire carrying posts) is the medium of carrying all types of wires. As numerous wires are carried using the same post, an entanglement of wires is always there on top of it.

The story is more interesting. In worst cases, even the deadliest current-carrying wires are kept naked. In many of them, there are hundreds or thousands of Volts of electricity. Even a single unwilling touch on it could turn deadly. But, you’ll see that life in metros, and villages alike, are running smoothly without any care about these deadly wires. People assume that when death comes, it will definitely come.

So, why care about the unfortunate ones?

There is one more interesting part of it. These posts are also one of the best places for doing outdoor advertising. You can see anything and everything pasted on these posts, if they are in a busy area. Posters, stickers, signage and what not? Probably, these posts are proud to be the new media of busy city's outdoor advertising. The same is applicable to the light posts that double up as carriers of all kinds of wires.

But does it look good enough?

It doesn’t. And that is the main aim of the story. Why can’t we do something intelligently? India is one of the major hubs of technology. Yet, we see these entangled and age-old steel-posts -discolored and tilted as if they were abandoned due to their inefficiency, everywhere. And the wires are happily passing across weighing on them. These wires are nasty pieces of example that people have discovered wires but they haven’t discovered how to carry them yet.

One more thing, will these posts and wires be there for long? No. We’re heading towards a wireless future. Have you seen the railway wires that used to carry the telegraph signals? They have become obsolete. And in most places, they’ve vanished. Their posts have bowed down as if they are too old to stand straight. Yet, they are providing us an important message.

The wires will also vanish one day.

Don’t believe this? Think about Wi Fi, Mobile phones and Near Field Communication. They’re all wireless. I believe scientists will come up with an idea to have a wireless society very soon. Although carrying signals without wires is possible, there is no proven method to carry electricity without wires yet. I believe it will come very soon. And thereby, the last remaining reason to have wires and the meshes will become an endangered idea.

The wireless society will live a fast life, without having to care about missing links due to cuts or damages of the wires. People will only see antennas everywhere. Probably, use of satellites will also add fuel to this process. However, that should take some time. We have no other option but to watch the entanglement till then.

And sharks are busy enough biting Google’s undersea cables. What?

In open air, the posts and wires are sometimes the source of leisure-time-rest for the birds. So, these birds that rest awfully absent-minded on these wires will have to live their life without the luxury of cables and wires. Mankind is really trying to snatch away all the opportunities that offer some luxury to other species. Sad!

Untill we get wireless, post your comments without any restrictions if you have sympathy for the great wired, Indian culture.

And also pray that no lives are lost due to naked wires in inappropriate places.

Getting wireless? Where is the TV remote?


Originally posted on : http://globeradar.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/wireless/

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)