ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Android Mini PC Buying Guide

Updated on March 24, 2014

What is an Android Mini PC?

The Android Mini PC is a new category of tiny or small PC devices that run on the popular Android OS and has become a highly sought after device. The Android Mini PC or sometimes known as the PC-on-a-stick or android TV stick makes a unique and ideal gift for someone who is interested in computers in general. Some versions of these small form Android PCs are also able to run on Linux OS so the Android Mini PC will also interest those who are into Linux as well as Android.

All Android TV stick devices come with an HDMI connector that allows it to connect to a TV or HDMI capable display. Hence, the Android Mini PC is sometimes referred to as an Android TV dongle or HDMI dongle as well.

The very first Android Mini PCs only started appearing around the middle of 2012 but within a very short period, there are more than a dozen different versions currently available on the market today. Some models are just purely repackaged or OEM versions that are identical except for the packaging and markings on the device while others are based on the same hardware but have extra hardware features and/or customized software.

If you are planning to get one, this buying guide will come in handy. This guide lists all the major versions of the Android Mini PC plus identifies the important features that you should consider when buying one.

An updated buying guide for quad-core Android Mini PCs covering over a dozen Rockchip RK3188 and Allwinner A31 devices can be found at my blog, Androydz.

Follow me on Twitter

I update my articles on a frequent basis with new information. Follow me on Twitter for update notifications on my Squidoo activity.

Follow @SquidooRoy

Uses for the Android mini computer

The most common use for these mini computers is of course to plug it into your HDTV and turn it into a smart TV device that is capable of web browsing, accessing social networks like Facebook and Twitter, play your multi media files like photos, music and video plus run thousands of apps and games designed for the Android OS.

However, this is only the tip of the iceberg as with a little tinkering, the Android Mini PC can do much more. Here are some of the uses for the Android Mini PC that have been thought up by actual users:

Use Skype on the TV

Add a USB webcam to the Android Mini PC and you can use your TV for Skype and you can do so from the comfort of your couch. Imagine having your entire family in the living room and exchanging Christmas greetings with your friends and relatives over Skype.

How to Use Skype on TV
Do you want to use Skype from the comfort of your living room with your TV? Here are three easy ways to get Skype running on your non Smart TV. The lowest cost method is only under $100.

Extra computer for the kitchen or bedroom

Do you have an old LCD monitor lying around that you no longer have use for? Why not turn that into an extra computer for the kitchen so that you can access your recipes or watch YouTube recipes conveniently. You can even use it to play your favorite music while working in the kitchen.

Or you can put it in your bedroom for both work and play. I actually wrote a couple of my Squidoo articles using such a setup. The only thing I have to get use to is that right clicking my mouse in Android actually sends me back to the launcher. I need to long press the left mouse button instead.

Home theater PC or video streaming device

The Android Mini PC can play most video and audio formats flawlessly including 1080p files. But that is already old school. In the age of the cloud everything is stored online, right?

With the Android mini computer, you can stream video from Netflix, Hulu Plus, Sopcast or any of the online video streaming services as long as an app for it is available. You can use the web browser and Flash for sites that do not have an app but the quality varies depending on the source. As for streaming music, you can stream from Pandora, Spotify or any of the thousands of online radio stations.

Need an extra Linux PC?

For the versions of the Android Mini PC that support it, booting into Linux couldn't be easier as all you need is to copy the Linux image into a micro SD file and the Android mini computer will boot from it turning it into a quick and dirty Linux computer. If you want to run Android again just pop out the SD card.

The Llinux support is quite robust with updated versions being released on a regular basis.

Turn it into the ultimate classic gaming machine

There are many Android console emulator apps that are able to emulate all the classic gaming consoles from the Game Boy to the NES to the Genesis to the N64 to the PS One. There is even a version of MAME that emulates all the classic arcade machines. Pair it with a couple of control pads and you have the ultimate classic gaming machine.

These are just a small sample of things that you can do with the Android Mini PC. Check out this article for a more complete list of ideas for the Android Mini PC.

What you shouldn't buy the Android Mini PC for

While the Android Mini PC is a very versatile device with many uses, it does have its limitations. Here are some of the things to look out for and to manage your expectations.

Replace your HTPC or your dedicated media box

With the correct player, the Android Mini PC is able to play most if not all media formats. However, audio sync may be an issue if you are a stickler for such issues. Some people are more sensitive to audio sync than others so if you are one of those type of people and you don't have an AV receiver that has the function to adjust audio sync, you should stay away.

The other issue with the Android Mini PC is the lack of a surround sound pass through support. Currently all audio is downsampled to stereo and there doesn't seem to be any method to pass through anything other than stereo via the HDMI output. If you do not want to waste your state-of-the-art 7.1 surround sound setup, you need to look somewhere else.

Expect all your existing USB peripherals to work with it

While the Android OS has built-in drivers to support a wide range of USB devices, it is still very much trial and error process. Most (but not all) USB keyboard and mouse including the RF wireless ones work. USB Bluetooth dongles are generally not supported.

A limited number of USB webcams do work but may not be supported by all apps. For example, it may work with the camera app but not with Skype. Regardless of the camera's resolution, it seems that Android only supports 640x480 for all webcams. The mic on the camera may not be supported even if the camera itself is.

A limited number of gamepads are also supported but may require a firmware upgrade. Among the reported supported gamepads include the PS3 and Xbox 360 gamepads.

Other devices that have been reported to be supported including 3G dongles, USB Ethernet adapters, USB sound cards and USB WiFi dongles. However, proper documentation is scarce and there have been conflicting reports are what is actually supported.

I have added as much information as I can find on supported devices on the individual review articles and in the case of the MK802, dedicated articles on camera support.

Play all your Android games on your big screen TV

The latest multi-core Android smart phones are becoming quite capable gaming devices. Some of the latest 3D games on Android like Dead Space, Shadowgun and Asphalt 7 look really gorgeous and can almost rival games that you can find on full sized consoles like the Xbox 360 and PS3.

However, don't expect to turn your Android Mini PC into an alternative to a gaming console and play all your games on a TV. The main problem isn't that the Android Mini PC cannot handle the CPU intensive games but the fact that many of these games require touch screen control and/or an accelerometer.

There is a possibility of connecting a USB game controller or use apps like Droidmote which allows you to use your Android phone as a controller but as mentioned above, USB peripheral support other than keyboard and mouse is pretty much trial and error and there is also the problem with lag when using your phone as a controller. It is not impossible but expect to spend a whole lot more time to get everything working properly.

Selecting the right chipset. Allwinner A10 or RK3066?

The chipset is the brain that powers the computer. All the current Android mini computers come with either the Allwinner A10 or the Rockchip RK3066 chipset. The older Android Mini PCs such as the original MK802, the MK802+, MK802 II and Uhost all use the older but very popular Allwinner A10 chipset.

The Allwinner A10 chipset pairs a 1.0 GHz Cortex-A8 CPU with a Mali-400 GPU. While it has support for 1080p HD video decoding, it is not a particularly fast chipset. Performance is a bit sluggish and there is a bit of lag.

The original MK802 also came with just 512 MB of RAM while all the other Allwinner A10 based units came with 1 GB RAM. Make sure that you buy the version with at least 1 GB RAM as the performance is much worse for the 512 MB version.

The newer Android mini computers like the UG802, MK808, MK802 III, iMito MX1, UG007 and Minix Neo G4 all come with the Rockchip RK3066 chipset that features a Dual Core Cortex A9 1.2 GHz Rockchip RK3066 CPU with Quad Core Mali 400 GPU. The RK3066 performance is similar to the Samsung Exynos 4210 chipset used in the Samsung Galaxy S2 smartphone which has very good performance and is only bested by the new quad core based smartphone models.

It is obvious that the RK3066 based models have much better performance and is preferred over the Allwinner A10 based models. However if you plan to run Linux on the Android Mini PC, you need to stick to the Allwinner A10 models as there is almost no support for Linux on the RK3066 due to the fact that chipset manufacturer Rockchip has yet to release the source code publicly. There is some progress on getting Linux to run on the RK3066 but it might take awhile before a truly stable version is available.

The other reason you might want to stick with the Allwinner A10 based models is that the Android TV dongles based on it have been around much longer and there is more information available such as information on supported USB webcams are more easily available compared to the RK3066 models. However, things will probably improve as more users start switching to the RK3066 models.

Skype on MK808, UG802, MX1, Neo G4 and MK802 III
Skype is often listed as a supported feature by the retailers of the Android Mini PCs such as the MK808, Ugoos UG802 and Rikomagic MK802 III. However, what...

Android OS
Android OS

Selecting the OS. Android 4.0 or 4.1?

All the Allwinner A10 based models come with either Android 4.0.3 or 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich) while the RK3066 based models either come with Android 4.0 (ICS), 4.1(Jellybean) or 4.2 (Jellybean).

The OS version is actually not a critical feature to consider as you can easily upgrade or replace the firmware easily. At this moment, the MK802 (which includes the MK802, MK802+ and MK802 II) has the best support when it comes to alternative OSes. While the official firmware only supports up to Android 4.0.4, it has support for Cyanogen Mod 9 and 10 as well as various flavors of Linux such as Fedora, Ubuntu and Puppy.

There is actually minimal difference between Android 4.0, 4.1 and 4.2 on the Android Mini PC. All 3 versions are designed to support bigger screen tablet PCs that work well with large screen TVs as well. However, stay away from older versions of the Android Mini PC that run on Android 2.3 or older as this Android version is not optimized for screens larger than those on a phone. There have also been reports of stability issues with Android 4.2 but things do tend to improve over time.

Firmware stability should be considered and among all the models tested so far, the Uhost and the Minix Neo G4 probably have the most stable default firmware for the Allwinner A10 and RK3066 based Android TV dongle respectively.

Performance wise, the Uhost runs noticeably faster than the other Allwinner A10 based models even though the hardware is almost identical. The Uhost also has a custom launcher which is designed for navigation on a large screen TV. However, the Uhost also has less support among from the open source community and as far as I know there is no alternative Android based firmware available for the Uhost. It does have support for Linux though as it is based on the Allwinner A10.

As for the Minix Neo G4, it actually runs a little slower than other RK3066 based models according to benchmarks but the manufacturer Minix has claimed that they have gone for stability instead of speed when developing their firmware. Like the Uhost, the Minix Neo G4 also has a customized front end that is designed to work better with its included IR remote.

The MK802, MK808 and UG802 has significant support among the open source community and alternative Android OS firmware are available. Some of these alternative OSes like Uberoid for the MK802 adds many new features that are not found on the official firmware.

If you don't think you have the technical know how to upgrade firmware or do not want to face such hassles, the Uhost and Neo G4 are probably the best bets among all the models as they are very usable out of the box.

Rockchip RK3066 Dual Core Android Mini PC Firmware and Linux Update Guide
Check out official firmware updates and custom ROMs that are available for the Android Mini PC. Includes instructions on how to run Linux on the Android Mini PC.

Linux
Linux

Running Linux on the Android Mini PC

I have already mentioned briefly above that only the Allwinner A10 based Android mini computers like the MK802 and Uhost are able to run Linux while the support for Linux on the RK3066 based models are still very poor at the moment.

The situation on the RK3066 may change in the future as there are efforts being undertaken to get Rockchip to release the source code publicly but there is no certainty at the moment. If running Linux is a must have feature for you then stick to the older models to be on the safe side.

(Update 11/19/12)

A copy of the kernel source for the RK3066 has been leaked out. With the availability of the source code, it is now highly possible to have Linux running on the RK3066 based Android mini computers. As this is a fairly new development, it might take a while before we actually see a fully working version of Linux on the RK3066.

(Update 1/31/13)

Picuntu, based on Ubuntu is currently available in alpha form for RK3066 based devices. For an alpha version, it is quite stable with most functions working including WiFi.

Skype on Android Mini PC
Skype on Android Mini PC

Running Skype on the Android Mini PC

Running Skype on the Android Mini PC requires a supported USB webcam and at this moment, identifying a USB webcam that works with the Android Mini PC is still very much a hit or miss affair. There is no official supported list of webcams on any of the Android Mini PC models although most dealers advertise Skype as a feature.

The MK802 having been around longer, has a more complete list of supported webcams based on feedback from actual users. The Uhost should be able to support the same list of webcams as well but since there are much fewer Uhost users, I have not been able to compile a similar list.

So far, I have only come across a single confirmation that the Microsoft Lifecam VX2000 works for the UG802 RK3066 based Android Mini PC while the Creative Live! Cam Chat HD has been reported to work on the MK808. Since the RK3066 based models have only been released not too long ago, it might take awhile before more users can provide confirmation on working webcams.

(Update 1/31/13)

There are a lot more USB webcams that have been identified to be working with Skype for the RK3066 devices. Details can be found in the Skype section in the devices' individual review articles.

If Skype is an important feature for you then the MK802 is probably the safer bet as many of the supported webcams are listed and can be purchased from Amazon

Skype on MK808, UG802, MX1, Neo G4 and MK802 III
Skype is often listed as a supported feature by the retailers of the Android Mini PCs such as the MK808, Ugoos UG802 and Rikomagic MK802 III. However, what...

Unique features to consider

All of the Android Mini PCs have some common features among them such as the use of HDMI for video and sound, a micro SD expansion slot for memory expansion and USB ports for USB peripherals such as keyboard and mouse but there are models with extra features that distinguish them from the rest of the models.

When it comes to extra features, the Uhost has a whole ton of them. Its most unique feature is probably its built-in support for an optional air mouse type remote control. While it lacks a full QWERTY keyboard, the controller makes navigation on the customized Uhost launcher an easy task.

The Uhost also has a built-in mic as well as a port that supports an external 3.5mm external microphone. This means that the Uhost has support for audio Skype out of the box. Last but not least, it also has a U-button that converts the Uhost into a USB storage drive when attached to a PC that simplifies the task of transferring files between the PC and the Uhost.

The MK808 on the other hand comes with 8GB of built-in storage ROM compared to the other models that come with a standard 4GB. However, since you can easily add more storage via the micro SD expansion slot, this is not a huge advantage over the others.

Besides the Uhost, the UG802 is the only other device that comes with a customized launcher with big icons. All the other devices come with either the standard ICS or JB launcher. This is also not a huge advantage as there are many alternative launchers both free and paid available on the Google Play Strore.

The Minix Neo G4 also has a customized launcher that is designed to work with the included IR remote. It is also the only Android IPTV device that comes with a remote control as a standard accessory.

The iMito MX1 and the UG007 are the only models that comes with Bluetooth connectivity. The iMito MX1 also has an aluminum body that helps to dissipate heat.

The Uhost2 has an optional Umouse2 controller that has a built in microphone. The microphone can be used for voice search as well as voice chat using Skype or Google Talk.

Known problems

There are known problems with some of the Android Mini PCs. Some of these problems are minor while others can be quite major. Some of these problems are fixable by updating the firmware while others are hardware based and cannot be rectified easily. I have listed the known problems or each model and whether they can be rectified.

Overheating

The MK802 (including MK802+ and MK802 II) have overheating issues. The device runs very hot after a few hours and there are reported cases of damaged units. Some users have resorted to adding heat sinks. The later MK802+ and MK802 II versions have additional ventilation holes that helps with venting the heat.

WiFi problems

There have been complaints of WiFi connectivity issues on the MK802 series, UG802, iMito MX1 as well as the MK808.

On the MK802, the problem arises from the lack of ESD shielding on the HDMI port which has been reported to cause WiFi interference and difficulty in connecting to the WiFi router. There has been reports of the MK802 causing connectivity problems for other nearby WiFi devices as well. Personally I have found the WiFi strength to be weaker than normal and drops occasionally.

There have been reports of WiFi connectivity problems and poor speeds on both the UG802 and MK808 but it is difficult to conclude if this is due to faulty hardware, software bugs or poor design. Some users claim to have resolve their WiFi issues by updating their firmware while others have modified their units by isolating the WiFi antenna to reduce interference. On the other hand, there are also users like me who did not experience any major WiFi issues.

One other thing to take note of is that the MK808 has problems with connecting to WiFi 802.11n which limits its theoretical max connection speed to 65Mbps. This might not be an issue for most people and it is most likely a software that may be fixed by future firmware updates.

Firmware bugs

Some of the initial firmware that are included with the Android Mini PCs had bugs in them. For the MK802, the initial firmware had no display resolution setting control.

For the MK808, the default firmware renders the display at a resolution that causes slight horizontal stretching. However both these issues were resolved with firmware updates. This resolution bug may also have caused the MK808 to be incompatible with some HDTVs.

While not really a bug but it is worthwhile to note that the default firmware for the MK808 and UG802 are not root enabled. Rooting however is possible and is not a complicated process. Alternatively, updating the firmware to an already rooted version is also an option.

Support for Google Play Store

While all the models came with the Google Play Store app that allowed users to connect to the store and download apps and media, certain models like the MK802 and UG802 did not have full access to the store meaning that certain apps are either not listed at all or identified as not compatible with the Android Mini PC device.

This can be resolved either by downloading the apps from another source and side loading it or update to a firmware that has support for the full Google Play Store.

Just give it to me straight. Which Android Mini PC should I get?

There is no single best Android Mini PC. Each model has its pros and cons. Instead of making a single recommendation, I will instead make a recommendation for each model based on its strengths.

Rikomagic MK802 (Link to review)

The MK802 is the Android Mini PC of choice if you like tinkering with firmware updates or plan to run Linux. It has the most support in terms of alternative OS from Cyanogen Mod 10 to Ubuntu. It also has the best updated list of supported USB peripherals from USB sound cards to webcams. However, take note of the overheating problem and possible WiFi issues although the MK802 II has supposedly better ESD shielding.

Mini MK802 Android 4.0 Google TV Box HD IPTV Player PC Allwinner A10 1G DDR3

The MK802+ Android Mini PC with 1GB RAM is ideal for those who like to tinker with an Android or Linux based computer.

Rikomagic MK802 II New Generation Mini Android 4.0 PC Google TV Box HD IPTV Player

A newly redesigned ESD circuitry protects and reduces ESD problems. An additional mini USB port has been added and the device now has a total of 3 USB ports while maintaining its incredibly compact form factor.

Smallart Uhost (Link to review)

The Uhost is the most stable and hassle free model of the lot that runs on the Allwinner A10 chipset. My advice is to go for the optional air mouse controller and you will have a pretty complete setup. The only thing that may be lacking is a full QWERTY keyboard.

Although it uses the Allwinner A10, performance wise it is somewhere between the MK802 and the faster RK3066 based models. It also has a lot of useful extra features.

Uhost U2 Android 4.0 Mini Pc Internet Tv Box 1g RAM 4gb ROM Allwinner A10 Hdmi/3g/wifi/skype

The Uhost is a well designed Android Mini PC that holds many advantages over other similar products plus it has a few extra features that are not found on others.

Minix Neo G4 (Link to review)

The Neo G4 may not be the fastest among the RK3066 based models but it is definitely the most stable of the lot. It is also the only Android TV dongle that comes with an IR remote as a standard accessory. The controller cannot compare to a fly mouse or mini touch pad keyboard controller of course but it works fairly well with the customized interface that Minix has designed for it.

The Neo G4's WiFi connectivity is regarded as one of the best among all the Android Mini PCs. If your wireless router is located far away from where you plan to use your Android Mini PC, the Neo G4 is a good choice.

The built in IR receiver also means that you can replace the included IR remote with your own learning IR remote like a Logitech Harmony remote.

MINIX NEO G4 Android 4.0 Dual Core RK3066 DDR3 1GB RAM / 8GB ROM Google TV Box Mini PC Dongle Wi-Fi / IR Remote

Arguably the most stable and the best of the dual core RK3066 based Android Mini PC devices. Comes with IR remote.



MK808 / MK808B (Link to review)

If you are willing to give up Linux support and don't mind getting your hands a little dirty with firmware updates, the MK808 may be the better choice. The speedy dual core RK3066 provides a much smoother experience overall.

(Update) The MK808 now has support for Linux. Picuntu Linux now works with all Rockchip RK3066 Android Mini PC devices. Check out Rockchip RK3066 Dual Core Android Mini PC Firmware and Linux Update Guide for further information.

In terms of community support, the MK808 looks set to be the RK3066 based Android Mini PC of choice despite its many initial problems. With more support, the chances of the problems being resolved with software updates either official or otherwise is higher. Like the MK802, the MK808 will require a little more tinkering than you will expect from a commercial product to get it to work the way you want it to.

The MK808B is an updated version of the MK808 with support for Bluetooth. Besides the additional of Bluetooth, the MK808B is essentially identical to the MK808.

SainSmart SS808 (MK808) PC-On-A-Stick/ Mini Computer, Android 4.1 OS, Dual Core 1.6 GHz A9 Processor

The MK808 has a Dual Core RK3066 Cortex A9 processor and 8GB storage. It is also one of the most popular RK3066 based devices despite its numerous firmware issues. If you don't mind tinkering with firmware updates, the MK808 is a good choice.

Bluetooth MK808B Dual Core Android 4.1 TV BOX Rockchip RK3066 Cortex-A9 Mini PC Smart TV Stick

The MK808B is an updated version of the MK808 with the addition of Bluetooth.

Smallart Uhost2 (Link to review)

The Uhost2, like the original Uhost, has great built quality, well designed and stable firmware plus the option of an air mouse controller with a built in microphone. Official support for firmware updates as well as support from the open source community is not expected to be as robust as the other more popular RK3066 based devices like the MK808 and UG802.

The Umouse2 controller with the microphone is a neat idea but it is sorely missing a QWERTY keyboard so you are probably better off buying one of those mini air mouse keyboards.

However, if you want a device that works well and has Skype voice call support out of the box, the Uhost2 is probably your best bet.

Ugoos UG802 (Link to review)

In terms of performance, the UG802 matches the MK808 plus it does not have the display stretching problem. If you want a dual core RK3066 based Android Mini PC but want less hassle with firmware updates, the UG802 is the better choice.

Community support is not as robust as the MK808 but due to the similarity of the 2 products, some of the development will probably spill over to the UG802. It is only a matter of time before it catches up to the MK808. However, since it is RK3066 based, chances of Linux support is slim.

(Update) The UG802 now has support for Linux. Picuntu Linux now works with all Rockchip RK3066 Android Mini PC devices. Check out Rockchip RK3066 Dual Core Android Mini PC Firmware and Linux Update Guide for further information.

Android 4.0 HDMI Mini PC Smart internet TV adaptor/dongle - RK3066 Dual Core 1.6Ghz CPU, WiFi N, HD 1080P UG802

The UG802 Android Mini PC comes with a faster dual core RK3066 processor and a quad core GPU. It also has a better cooling design that prevents over heating even when running over long periods of time.



Ugoos UG007

The UG007 is basically the UG802 but with the additional of Bluetooth and an upgrade to Android 4.1. Get the UG007 if Bluetooth is a must have for you or otherwise stick with the UG802 and save a few dollars.

New Version Bluetooth Ug007 Mini Pc Android 4.1 Google Tv Dongle Dual Core Cortex A9 Wifi 1080p RAM 1gb+rom 8gb+3d

Operation System: Google Android 4.1.1 Jelly Bean, supports external 3G, with Bluetooth. RAM:DDR3 1GB. Internal Memory Nand Flash:8GB

iMito MX1 (Link to review)

The iMito MX1 is probably the best looking Android TV dongle among the lot due to its sleek looking Aluminum body. However, performance wise, there is no significant advantage over the other RK3066 based models out there but it is one of the few models that comes with Bluetooth connectivity. If you require Bluetooth then you should consider the MX1.

Mini iMito MX1 Android 4.1 Jenny Bean Google TV Box HD IPTV Player PC Rockchip RK3066 1G DDR3 1.6Ghz Cortex A9

The iMito MX1 Dual Core Android Mini PC is one of the first Google TV Box devices to offer Bluetooth connectivity and an attractive aluminum body that helps dissipate the heat.

Rikomagic MK802 III / MK802 IIIS (Link to review)

The MK802 III is Rikomagic's dual core RK3066 version of the MK802. Both the original MK802 and the MK802 II were single core Allwinner A10 devices. However, there is very little that differentiates the MK802 III from the other competing Rk3066 devices and there is nothing that is truly unique about the MK802 III to make it stand out from the rest.

The MK802 III's biggest draw is probably the fact that it is manufactured by Rikomagic, the producers of the original MK802. The MK802 has been enjoying a lot of attention from the open source community with new development being revealed even up to today. The hope is that the same amount of attention will be given to its successor, the MK802 III.

An updated version of the MK802 III with Bluetooth connectivity is available as the MK802 IIIS. There are no other significant differences between the MK802 IIIS and the MK802 III except for the support for Bluetooth.

Rikomagic MK802 III Dual Core Android 4.1 Jelly Bean Mini PC Rockchip RK3066 1.6Ghz Cortex A9 1GB RAM 8G ROM HDMI (Black)

8GB ROM version of the MK802 III.

The MK802 III is quite a popular Android Mini PC due to the success of the original MK802.

Rikomagic MK802IIIS Bluetooth Mini TV Box Player Dual Core Rockchip 3066 Android 4.1

An upgraded version for MK802III, supports Bluetooth. 8GB Memory.

What's looming over the horizon

The rate of new and updated Android Mini PC models being launched and released is frighteningly fast. From the first MK802 to the MK802+ to the MK802 II and lately the MK802 III has taken less than 6 months.

I am starting to see the next wave of Android Mini PCs with next generation quad core processors coming out like the Allwinner A31 and the Rockchip RK3188.

Please leave your comments on this buying guide here

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Roy Ringland profile image

      Roy 3 years ago from Northern Ireland

      Fantastic piece of technology, I can't believe I'm only hearing about these now!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 3 years ago

      @wallymc1: No you can't. This works with TVs and monitors, not laptops, tablets or cellphones.

    • profile image

      wallymc1 3 years ago

      Can I use this with my Asus T100 Laptop or my Nokia 928 cellphone, both run Windows 8. It would be great to be able to download Google and Android Apps

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 3 years ago

      @waldenthreenet: It is not an emulator. The Android Mini PC runs on Android OS and works by plugging it to a HDMI capable display.

    • waldenthreenet profile image

      waldenthreenet 3 years ago

      I see the prices for the Android Mini PC starts at $40 or so same as some other Mini PC. But can the Android Mini PC run the Android Emulator via USB plug in ?

    • profile image

      tarekbelghith 4 years ago

      Gents, I just bought a Genius FaceCam 311 for my MK809II but only microphone works for skype and Hangouts.. any operation to make it work,

      FYI, I connected a powered Belkin USB Hub which i am using for the wireless integrated keyboard and mouse.. thanks

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The whole idea of the Android TV Stick is that it can turn a normal TV into a smart TV at a fraction of the cost. With a good controller, I do believe that the TV stick is better than a Smart TV.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Great Post Roy! Do you think an Android TV stick can be better than an Android Smart TV? (The Samsung ones for example) I'm planning to buy one but then saw your article...

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The quad core models buying guide can be found at http://www.androydz.com/quad-core-android-mini-pc-...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Have you had a chance to check out the quad core models yet? Would really appreciate an update of this great article. Thanks

    • profile image

      manny-alonzo-7 4 years ago

      My son gave me the iPazzPort Mini PC Android 4.0 for my birthday (It shows SoftwinerEvb in properties). The first couple of hours seemed to work OK (with exception of Google Play which wouldn't allow my existing account, so I had to create a new one). Now the device has no sound most of the time, drops the Wi-Fi connection and can't connect to gloogle play. Do you think it will benefit from upgrading to Uberoid?

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: If XBMC is your main criteria then you should get the Pivos Xios as that is the only Android device that is officially sanctioned by XBMC.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi

      I need to know which one is good to have XBMC. and which one of them are the newest one. its log of information its make me confused

      I have LCD with HDMI and other connections, but I like to use HDMI.

      I like to use skype with camera and mic too.

      for these requirements which one should I buy? and from where?

      Thanks in Advance

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I meant "quite" not "quick".

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: They might have multiple contract manufacturers building the same product but I am not sure.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Roy,

      Thanks for the quick response. I was looking at the MK809III from different suppliers in China. The price vary quick a bit and they have different daily production rates. That is why I thought there might be more than one manufacturer making the same model.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: For the same model, they are all made by the same manufacturer although they may OEM the product so you may see similar looking products but with different brands and model numbers on them. For example, the Smallart Uhost2 is also sold as the Probox2 but they are the same product.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      For a particular model of mini pc, for example MK808, are they all made by the same manufacturer or the model is a spec that many manufacturers are making them?

    • wolvyz profile image

      wolvyz 4 years ago

      I have one of these devices which helps me convert my TV screen into an android PC. Is totally fun at first, but then if you really think about it; a television is meant to watch videos and not use it as a phone. But I like the fact that the android pc stick supports a lot of video formats for movies which I cat watch in my television at ease.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Re. comment on webcam resolutions maxing out at 640x480 regardless of the capabilities of the webcam, could this be due to the settings in the camera configuration file (etc/camera.cfg). I have successfully edited this file to switch the camera being listed as a back camera to a front camera (I did this as Skype automatically shows the back camera feed as full screen). However, there are other settings in this file which appear to dictate the resolution and refresh rate. I only have a VGA camera so can't really test the effect of changing these settings. Anyone with a HD webcam willing to have a go?

      Here are the settings which I think are restricting the resolution to 640x480:

      "used_preview_size = 1

      key_support_preview_size = 640x480

      key_default_preview_size = 640x480

      used_picture_size = 1

      key_support_picture_size = 640x480

      key_default_picture_size = 640x480"

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: The external antenna seems to work really well. Granted I haven't had it more than a room away from the router but it was showing the neighbor's router which I've never seen show up on my phone or computer before. I have to say I'm impressed. Netflix playback is great. I thought Hulu+ was going to be a no-go do to an unsupported device error but I was able to side load a hacked version of the app that's had the supported device check disabled. The picture looks good and there's a slider in the display settings to resize the image if your screen overscans. It looks ok on the monitor too. Text is much sharper than I expected since it's not outputting the native resolution. The analog av output is able to function as an audio output and drive a set of computer speakers when the HDMI is adapted to DVI so there's no need for a separate USB sound card. Probably the most surprising is that both the camera and the microphone in my Logitec QuickCam E3500 work. I was able to video chat with a friend on Skype with no issues. Overall I'm really happy with it.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The only thing I am curious about is how well the external WiFi antenna works for improving the WiFi strength. But if you can give an overall impression on how well the UG008 meets your requirements, that would be great as well. Thanks.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: It might not be too bad. From past experience, displaying 16:9 resolutions on that (16:10) screen results in some fuzziness of text but isn't noticeable at all in video. It's when 4:3 stuff gets stretched that it gets really ugly. Maybe somewhere down the road either the manufacturer or some enterprising dev will add support for some of the common computer monitor resolutions. I'll post back with my impressions after I've had a chance to put it through it's paces. Tracking shows it as "out for delivery" so I should have it later this afternoon. Is there anything specifically you'd like to know about it? Any testing I should do or benchmark apps I should run? If there is, let me know and I'll post the results.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: You will have a slightly stretched 720p then. I think it is not so bad and text should still be readable. There may be a slight problem with subtitles in Netflix though as the font is really small and there is no option to set the font size AFAIK. With it stretched, it may be difficult to read but this is only a problem if you need subtitles in Netflix. Let me know how the UG008 turns out as I never got a chance to try that out.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Upscaling is the problem with the monitor I want to use (Acer al2216w). It will handle pretty much any resolution up to 1680x1050 that you want to throw at it but it stretches everything (even the 4:3 resolutions) to fill the screen. That results in blurry text and in extreme cases noticeably distorted images. I'd gladly live with letterboxing/windowboxing for 1:1 pixel mapping and a clean looking image. Unfortunately there's no setting to disable upscaling. I went ahead and ordered the ug008. With the ethernet jack, external wifi antenna, and analog AV port (in addition to HDMI), it seemed like it would be the most versatile of the ones I've looked at. Even if it doesn't work with the monitor the way I'd like, I've still got 720p and 1080p TV sets to try it with and I expect I'll get my money's worth out of fun had tinkering with it if nothing else. If it does work well with the monitor, then I'll probably end up buying a couple more for the TVs. Thanks again for the help and advice!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I think the monitor compatibility has more to do with the monitor itself rather than the TV stick. Most of the mini PCs allow you to set various resolutions from 480p up to 1080p. If your monitor is able to upscale or downscale any of the common TV resolutions, it should be okay.

      The only problem that I can foresee with a less common device like the UG008 is that there is less support from the open source community. If the firmware has problems then you are stuck with it. The only way around it would be to try using a custom firmware for a similar product but normally it will not be 100% compatible. In the case of the UG008, you might end up with a non working ethernet port for example.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Thanks for the reply Roy! Reading back over my post, I realized I should have probably ranked the features I was asking about in some order of importance. A quad core processor and 2 GB of ram was more of a want than a need. If the current crop of dual core, 1GB models offer smooth streaming video playback then they'll do just fine. I already have a USB sound card that's not being used so I can drop the 3.5mm port to the bottom of the list as well. What remains then is LCD monitor compatibility and Bluetooth. With that in mind, I've been looking really hard at the UG008. The demonstration video I saw had it connected to a monitor and it has Bluetooth as well as an ethernet port and external wifi antenna. Looks nice from what I can tell. The only thing I find troubling is there doesn't seem to be much information about it elsewhere on the internet. I don't know if that's because it's relatively new or people are avoiding it for some reason.

      Thanks again!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I have not personally tested any of the quad core models as they have just started appearing. Both the CX-919 and QC802 meet your requirement of quad core, 2GB RAM and BT. None of the Android Mini PCs I have tested so far has a 3.5mm audio port but you can add a cheap USB sound card for under $5 to add this feature. Out of all the units I have tested so far, only the Minix Neo G4 works perfectly with both an old ViewSonic 1680x1050 LCD monitor (mini PC output set to 720p) I have as well as my newer LG 1080p LED TV. It could be an issue with my monitor though as it is more than 5 years old. The others just work on the TV. I would recommend the Neo G4 but it doesn't meet any of your requirements. It works great for basic browsing and streaming video.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thanks for the great article! I was wondering if you could recommend a model with a 3.5mm audio port for use with separate speakers? Built-in Bluetooth would be nice as I already own a Bluetooth mini keyboard/track pad. If both could be had in a newer device with a quad core processor and 2+ GB of ram (to "future proof" somewhat) that would be great. I'm also curious how these Android Mini PCs handle oddball resolutions. For example a 1680x1050 lcd monitor vs. a 1920x1080 lcd tv. Would it be able to output the monitor's native resolution to keep text from appearing fuzzy? The reason I ask is that I'd like to be able to pair it with an old lcd monitor to make a low cost all-in-one pc for basic web browsing and streaming video (Netflix, Hulu+, Youtube) for use in a guest room.

      Thanks in advance!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The new RK3188 is quite a powerhouse. It beats out both the Tegra 3 and Exynos 4412. I haven't got the chance to try out any of the quad core models yet though.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent article. Seriously nice job. I see quad core have been out for a awhile. I see rockchip even has quadcore now. Can you update the article, or just recommend the best one(s) now?

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes, the Roku is good at what it does but it is a specialized product. The Android Mini PC is sort of a jack of all trades and master of none.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @LarsFromMars: OK in that case if you don't mind spending a little extra for one of those air mouse or touch pad type keyboard, it might just be "wife friendly" enough. Also, some kind of simplified launcher would help as well.

      Yes, I would expect the GameStick and Ouya to be more polished BUT I expect both these system to have their own apps ecosystem. Not sure if either devices will allow users to download non gaming apps from the official Google Play Store. XBMC will be supported but I'm not sure about other non gaming apps.

      I am a backer for the GameStick Kickstarter but not for the Ouya. I picked the GameStick because of the portability and I mainly work with the Android TV sticks. I might pick up the Ouya later though.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Roy, thanks for your response.. I am pretty much in the same boat as Lars above and I did consider the Roku as well for my needs, but the fact is that the Roku does not do internet browsing - even the most expensive Roku cannot browse. So if I want to play content that is not YouTube or one of the well known sites, then Roku will not be helpful. Of the other devices that are android based, almost all are over $100 - unlike the android sticks. Which is the only reason I am looking at android sticks. I will look into STBs as you mentioned. Thanks,.

    • profile image

      LarsFromMars 4 years ago

      @royyap: Thanks, Roy. I secretly do love screwing around with android firmware and settings, but I think my challenge will be to make the final product "wife-proof". Easy and reliable.

      Maybe I'll look at gamestick and ouya when they hit retail this June. I expect they'll be a little more polished and reliable than some of these $50 sticks. Hopefully you'll get your hands on them before I do; I await your reviews!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @LarsFromMars: If you are going to use it for Netflix, YouTube, Plex, etc then yes, a properly configured stick will work well but I must also admit, it will never be as good as a Roku, Xbox or any dedicated media device. There are some compromises that you would have to make.

      For example, controlling an Android UI with a trackpad/air mouse device is not ideal. There is no multi channel surround sound support. Getting some apps to work properly like XBMC is a real pain.

      Are any of the other devices you mentioned able to meet all of your requirements? A few of the devices you listed are actually relatively cheap like the Roku for instance. The Roku does what it is designed to do very well but the Android stick offers much more functionality. If the Roku can meet all your requirements, I'll say go for the Roku.

      If you enjoy flashing firmware, setting and configuring apps, and squeezing every last bit of performance out of your devices, you should go for the Android stick.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes, USB hubs are supported. If you just add a couple of low powered devices like a thumb drive and a keyboard for example, it should be fine. For more devices and higher powered ones, a powered USB hub is highly recommended.

      For Skype calls, the built in mic on the MK812 and the Measy U2C or even on the attached webcam are actually good enough if you are not positioned too far away (less than 8 feet). They are not good enough for Voice Search though in my opinion.

      If making video call is a big consideration for you, the MK812 is much less headache to set up. Unless you already own a supported webcam and are willing to jump through a few hoops, I would go for the MK812.

      You may also want to take a look at the Android based set top box as an alternative. Most come with wired LAN.

    • profile image

      LarsFromMars 4 years ago

      Has the reliability and usability of these android tv sticks improved to the point where they are viable alternatives to something like a Roku? Because when I look at what a Roku, Ouya, Gamestick, Pivos, etc can do, I think "I bet I could do that with a cheap, open android device and get better bang for the buck". Is that crazy?

      A poor college kid will buy a $50 android tv stick and and tolerate overheating, crashing, stretched video, glitchy audio, and dodgy wifi. But not me. I'm happy to spend lots of time screwing around with flashing firmware, changing settings, and configuring apps. I'm not afraid of any of that. But once I've got it all working, I expect to sit back and enjoy it working reliably. Not *perfectly*, but at least as good as a Roku or xbox or ps3 works. I'll use it for netflix, youtube, plex, crackle, angry birds, etc.

      Is that realistic. Can you say "buy a ____ stick and flash it with ____ firmware and then you'll be good."? Roy, I don't expect you to stake your reputation on this recommendation; I'm just trying to calibrate my expectations ;)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Has anyone tried using a USB hub with Android Mini PCs? If yes is there a limit on the device count? I would like to use a EthernetUSB adapter, RF keyboard dongle and a webcam all connected to a single Android MiniPC. Would that be possible?

      I am thinking of getting either mk812 or mk808. mk808 now available for under $50 while 812 is at $70. With these things falling in price steeply, it only makes invest the least amount.

      With the mk812, I am assuming I can at least reduce USB device count by one since it has built in camera, and maybe one more because it has BT keyboard support. However there are no BT keyboards currently available with voice like the iPazzPort Voice which is 2.4G dongle based and I like the voice on keyboard for Skype. So I will need to connect at least 2 USB devices to mk812. However with mk808 has a $30 discount as compared to mk812 and since I will not use the Wifi from mk812 and use USB Ethernet adapter instead though I will need to buy a webcam which will put it in the same price range as mk812.

      Not a easy choice...wish they had 2.4G standard and built in to the mini-pc so separate dongle was not required as well as wired Ethernet built in.

      Thanks in advance for response.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It is possible that your IIIs died on you. See if you can get it detected by your PC and reinstall or update the firmware. That might help.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Rikomagic 5th MK802 IIIS Bluetooth Dual Core CPU Android 4.1.1 Mini PC TV Box HD

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Which OS ver does your IIIs run on? I noticed lately that some of the manufacturers are putting in OS 4.2 on their devices although stability is an issue.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I hade to return Rikomagic IIIs because it locked up at the Android opening screen, can't make fully boot up. It was great for the week it worked. This is apparently frequently reported in forums. I ind advise on techniques to make it work, but I haven't seen anyone say they actually were able to fix it. I want another unit, but I sure don't want the same problem again. Any ideas for the stability I am looking for?

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: With Flash, more processing power and more RAM always helps. In your case, I may consider waiting then. NAS movie playback depends more on network connection speed while the RK3066 is already pretty good for SNES games.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Hi Roy - the primary use of it will be streaming soccer games from an online website (which are flash encoded) and I do not plan to run more than one application at a time. I may also stream some movies from my NAS and play SNES games, but they would very much be secondary uses. Given the current models are dual core but have quad core graphics processors, I am wondering whether I actually need the extra power of a quad core processor. If you have any insights, I would greatly appreciate it.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It depends a lot on what you plan to do with it. The faster processor and extra RAM helps of course but is there anything that you plan to do with it that the current dual core versions cannot do due to the slower CPU? One possible reason is software based HD video decoding for XBMC.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @royyap: Great, thanks Roy - I see that that RK3166 devices are imminent, which have a 1.8 Ghz processor, 2GB of Ram and Android 4.2. Do you have a view on whether it is worth waiting for the RK3166 devices or going with a RK3066 (as the technology seems to move very quick, so I assume there will always be a new device around the corner). Thanks again for your help - it is very kind

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Thanks for the compliments. Flash works fairly well on the RK3066 devices. But there are a couple of things to take note of.

      Firstly, Android 4.1 (Jellybean) and above does not officially support Flash. There is a workaround for the problem but you need to do sideload Flash as you won't be able to download it from the Google Play Store.

      Secondly, it can be a pain to get the video to play properly like getting full screen playback. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. If you have an Android phone or tablet, check out your streaming site and see how well it works. If it is working fine on your phone, it should work okay on the mini PC.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi Roy, I would like to stream soccer coverage from an online site (which will be flash) - do you know how well these perform and whether there is anything I should look out for when trying to find one which can handle such streaming (I was thinking the Timing Power RK3066)? Thanks in advance - a fantastically informative and useful article and Q&A. Tom

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: If you are setting it up for older folks, you may need to do some extra setup. It all depends on how familiar they are with the Android interface. If they already use an Android phone or tablet or even an iPhone, the learning curve might be lower and you can probably get away with leaving things as they are. Otherwise, I would suggest either getting something that has a simplified interface or customize your own with XBMC or Mizuu.

      The set top box models like the X5, HiMedia Q5 or Prometheus have more options when it comes to connectivity and outputs (LAN, analog video, S/PDIF) plus they do have support for multi channel surround sound which the Android sticks don't. Other than that they do not offer much advantages over the sticks. If you want hardware support for XBMC, you can consider the Pivos XIOS as that is the other model offering XBMC support. There is some on going effort to get support on the G4 and X5 but it is still in early stages.

      The MK812 sounds really promising with the built in camera and bluetooth but I have yet to personally try it out. On paper it looks good.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi there...

      Thank you for your detailed analysis of various models. It's been very informative.

      My case is this: I would like to equip my old-school parents (~65 y.o.) with (alternative) movies and skype device. They have laptops (which they use for skype, photos, movies, and browsing daily news). I was thinking of adding one little Android device so that they can watch movies (and perhaps use Skype) without having to connect laptop to external 24 inch monitor (which they also have).

      So I was thinking which model to choose. I read your guide, but I also found newer models on Internet, that now have web-camera included (MK812), or have LAN (RJ-45) connector for LAN cable/internet (MINIX NEO X5 Android 4.1.1 Dual Core Google TV Player / Bluetooth / 1GB RAM / 16GB ROM) or even external antenna and a camera (MK812 Mini PC Dual Core 1.6G Camera Mic Bluetooth).

      What is your opinion on those devices?

      Thank you for your kind help.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @supergras: Awww.....Billy. You say the nicest things :D Glad you found the lens informative.

    • supergras profile image

      supergras 4 years ago

      Roy, I have to be honest... this was hands down THE most informative squidoo lens I've seen.

      I'd NEVER thought of buying a mini android PC, but I just ordered the Rikomagic MK802 because I have 2 extra LCDs just sitting right in front of me.

      Thanks!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Jeff. Out of the 3 models you mentioned, I have only tried out the UG802 personally. Although I didn't face encounter any WiFi issues, there are a lot of reports on WiFi problems on this model. The UG007 is almost identical to the UG802 except for the addition of Bluetooth and 4.1 OS.

      My personal recommendation is the Minix Neo G4 is you want stable WiFi and if you need Bluetooth as well, the Uhost2 with BT (not all versions come with BT).

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I'm getting close to buying one of these and was wondering about WiFi on the ug802, ug007, and mk809. Have you found that one works better than the other? Or if there is a model I didn't mention that has better WiFi? I think the WiFi will be the make or break for me. Thanks for your help and excellent guide!

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Most of them are stretched 720p. However there are true 1080p firmware versions available for most devices. Check out https://hubpages.com/technology/mk802-android-firm... and https://hubpages.com/technology/dual-core-android-... for more info.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      First of all... Good work! And thank You!!

      Only a question: What about the graphic resolution?

      I mean, they are all 1920x1080 FullHD really or they "strech" to 1080p?

      Thanks.

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Yuv. Yes, I do sample all of the products that are in the guide.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      What a great write-up... Very informative. Thank you!

      Do you sample the actual products?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank you Roy - it was very helpful

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Not yet but hopefully I can take a look at it soon.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thankyou for your guide. Do you have an opinion on the MK809 and MK809 MK 2

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 5 years ago

      @aceskir27: About a month ago but I update it every week or so. Your suggestion to add a date is noted.

    • profile image

      aceskir27 5 years ago

      When did you write this article? Would be nice to have a date at the top that tells readers.

    • RandySturridge profile image

      RandySturridge 5 years ago

      Again great information...and am looking forward to making a purchase in the very near future through one of your lenses...The products you promote are way to good to to pass up, coupled with the information you provide and in reading some reviews on amazon...you are holding true to what you say. Thanks

    • amitsarkar lm profile image

      amitsarkar lm 5 years ago

      your lens is really good and this having a good information on Android..

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Great compilation of news !!!

    • profile image

      JoshK47 5 years ago

      Excellent information - thanks for sharing!

    • ketchingup lm profile image

      ketchingup lm 5 years ago

      I needed this 6 months ago. Great Lense

    • royyap profile image
      Author

      royyap 5 years ago

      @psk09: Thanks for being my very first visitor to this lens! Glad you liked it (pun intended) :)

    • profile image

      psk09 5 years ago

      Great Lens!

      I love your layout too.