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Getting Rid of Cable

Updated on December 1, 2014

I'm a Dinosaur and That's Okay

I am getting rid of cable TV because I have had enough. Enough of paying for shows I rarely watch. Enough of the high cost. Enough of "having" to have cable. No I don't, I tell you! I can live without cable!

Well, not without the cable I need for the Internet, but I'm pretty sure I can live without cable television.

Since I plan to get a streaming device, getting an Apple AirPort Express router was the first step to my getting rid of cable.

Update: It's been a month now since I got rid of cable TV and I haven't missed it (much) at all! I have learned to work around shows I like to watch using a combination of Amazon Prime, HuluPlus, Crackle, which is a free channel on Roku, and watching DVDs and shows on the network Web sites.

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Getting rid of cable gave me more time to be productive.
Getting rid of cable gave me more time to be productive.

Alternatives to Cable TV

Doing my research to what's available

I have to let things percolate a while before I make the move. For things near and dear to my heart, that is. And television is my friend. I make no excuses for watching TV. I love television! I love to be entertained.

But I do have varied interests and love to watch true crime shows just as much as romantic comedies, and a good dose of a cooking show or people who keep too much stuff is a welcome half hour or hour if I'm in the mood for that.

So, this decision to get rid of cable TV did not come lightly, but I have been stewing over it for at least 6 months. I had to decide the best route to take. There are so many options these days, it's crazy! I mean, I grew up watching three or four channels, having to get up off my butt to change the channel, and yes, I remember black and white television. Back in the olden days, we were just happy to have something to watch!

I have to say the best thing about getting rid of cable TV was the extra time it's given me.

Image Credit: The Graphics Fairy

So, are you a dinosaur too? - (I doubt if you are, but I'm sometimes slow to change.)

How do you mainly watch television?

See results

As I write this (July 30, 2012), the 2012 London Olympics are going full bore.

Without cable, I visit online Web sites to take

in photos and video snippets of events.

Since I'm not a huge sports fan (at all),

I don't really miss it, but I would have liked

to have seen the opening ceremonies.

Oh well!

Wireless Routers - First things first

To get rid of cable, I first had to go wireless. Yes, as I mentioned before, I am a dinosaur. I have a Razor phone. (Yes, it's more than 5 years old, but it works, so why change?) I don't get online with my phone. I don't text. I talk on my phone. That's it.

I don't own a device. Not an iPad nor Kindle or any other highfalutin thingie-ma-bob. Sure, I've seen them. I've used them. I love playing Angry Birds and Plants Vs. Zombies on my kids' iPad or iPhone, but I don't own one of these of my very own.

So, I told myself that I never needed wireless. It would have been nice for when people visit who actually own these things (iPads, iPhones, what have you). But oh well.

Anyway, I broke down last week and bought an Apple AirPort Express. So, now, I am wireless!

If you're considering an alternative to cable TV,

check out the options.

Take some notes, ask friends,

then do what you're comfortable with.

Roku Streaming Player - An Alternative to Cable TV

After researching my options, I ordered the Roku 2 XS 1080p Streaming Player. I'll let you know how I like it when I've started watching TV and movies with it.

Fast forward 1 week. I have my Roku streaming player (the Roku 2 XS model), and my daughter was in town so she hooked it up. Yay! I love it. It came with a free trial month of HuluPlus so I've been using it plus Crackle, another free option, to watch TV shows. I've only had this device for a few days so I'm still getting used to it. More later on how it's working out.

Roku Streaming Device

With my Roku streaming device I watch television shows and movies on Netflix, HuluPlus,

NBC News, & Amazon Prime.

But How Can I Watch TV? - Lots of options

One way to watch your "normal" network shows is to install a good old-fashioned television antenna. These things have come a long way from the old rabbit ears days! There are so many options that let you get great reception and a wide array of stations.

Apple TV - Another fine alternative to cable TV

Did you know you can watch some

TV shows on the network's Web site?

You can!

Tips for Choosing and Using a Streaming Device - to watch TV

Read up on alternatives to cable TV. See what options there are and what will work best for you. I plan to save at least $60 a month by getting rid of cable.

Angry Birds came with my Roku box.

I love those Angry Birds.

Affiliate Disclosure

This author, Peggy Hazelwood, participates in Amazon, eBay, All Posters, and other affiliate advertising programs. When you click an advertising link on this page and make a purchase, I receive a small percent of the sale. Thank you for reading this far!

Have you thought about getting rid of cable? - Did you? Will you? Let us know your story.

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    • MoreThanAMama profile image

      MoreThanAMama 

      4 years ago

      I cancelled cable more than 6 months ago now. I created a lens on my experience doing so. I'm adding your lens to mine. . . https://hubpages.com/entertainment/how-to-save-mon...

    • mcstacy profile image

      mcstacy 

      5 years ago

      I fired cable a year ago. I use the antenna, netxflix, and amazon. Saved myself over $1000 making that move.

    • profile image

      foxtrot3 

      5 years ago

      Yep, cable TV is history at my house. Made an antenna out of old wire coathangers and it works amazingly well.

    • Pam Irie profile image

      Pam Irie 

      6 years ago from Land of Aloha

      We have very basic cable and nothing extra. This is great information though because I've been wondering about many of these other options.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 

      6 years ago from Central Florida

      I'm not much of a TV watcher, but hubby is. When I wanted to watch the Who Do You Think You Are series, I found the back episodes online. Worked fine.

    • gypsykitschpres profile image

      gypsykitschpres 

      6 years ago

      YES, we have. This lens is very timely for us. I'm so sick of cable. I'm actually a big fan of NetFlix, but I also didn't know about some of these options, so thanks.

    • Scarlettohairy profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Hazelwood 

      6 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @JDoyle32: Thanks for the first hand testimonial of what you're using. You're exactly right about a combination of things working. I feel better already knowing that on my next cable bill will I'll only be charged for the Internet access.

    • profile image

      JDoyle32 

      6 years ago

      And excellent overview. I got rid of my satellite service back in 2008. It was costing me $80 a month and I was barely using it. I've done a combination of the things that you mentioned. I think that this is the best approach to getting rid of cable / satellite. There's no one thing that will replace all the content. But, if you combine a bunch of different things together you can recreate the experience. My setup looks like this: https://sites.google.com/site/nomoretvbill/ and it combines an HD antenna (for local shows, sports, and news) with a Roku for streaming Amazon/Netflix with a small form factor PC for surfing the web and watching YouTube with a 2 TB NAS (network attached storage) for watching downloaded content. All of it is connected to my big screen HD TV and stereo. I don't miss paying for satellite and so far I've saved about $5,000 during the last 5 years.

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