ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

state of software 2012 witnessed flourishing software industry

Updated on June 27, 2013

A flourishing software industry in year 2012

As far as the software industry is concerned, 2012 turned out to be yet another exciting year for geeks and ordinary users alike. Some waited in long queues overnight to get the latest operating system, while others took benefit of and formed businesses out of the hovering, ever-expanding computing cloud. Looking at 2011 in the rear view mirror, the software industry also continued to fuel growth in the tablet economy by offering tablet-friendly systems and application software

Operating systems

If we focus just on the market share slats,. 2012 seems to be just like any other year. Microsoft Windows ruled the market with about 92 per cent share, followed by Mac OS and L4r, t.ix at about 7.2 per cent and 1.2 per cent. Respectively. However, the huge shift in operating system design as well as functionality that had been predicted previously was finally witnessed this year. This shift has been largely driven by hardware and its usage, as it comprises mainly of tablet-friendly look 'n* feel, enhanced security features — considering that more and more devices are used on the go — and sharing features to make it easier for users to keep their social networks updated. Speed and support to make multi-tasking easier were a few other factors that were given extra consideration in the newer versions of operating systems this year. The final version of Windows 8 finally hit the market in October, and has been receiving positive reviews so far. Mac OS X Mountain Lion also made it to the shelves. Tiles-based touch-centric Modern All inspired by Windows Phone, Charms bar and snap mufti-tasking is considered some of the significant features of Windows 8. Those of OS X Mountain Lion include Finder Share Button, AirPlay Mirroring, Notification center and Messages (yes, the same that's available in i0S). And lastly Linux remained primarily the choice of geeks and Enterprise users.

Programming software The programming arena saw a slight shift when it came to ranking. C seems to be occupying the first spot in the year 2012, as compared to Java last year, which comes at second place this year. Programming languages continued to support features required for smart and cloud computing. Microsoft also launched Visual Studio 2012, encouraging developers to create apps that support Windows 8, and also the new generation of tablets like Microsoft Surface, which is exposed. e-.. To be released by the end of this year. To further motivate developers. Microsoft also issued a free express version to create desktop apps. Some new programming languages or their latest stable releases also surfaced this year. Whereas a few of them were worked upon se that they could be released next year. New programming languages like Mozilla Foundation's RUST, Google's Go and Scala a-i expected to make it easier to develop large complex cloud-based cloud-based apps.

Application software This year various new desktops, Smartphone and tablet applications were introduced, while existing ones were enhanced to support the core focus area of the industry, making content readily accessible and easy to share with others. Some of the Smartphone apps that made it to the top include Flip board — an application to aggregate web content, be it text or videos in a magazine layout. Flipboard originally gained popularity as an iOS app, and was later released for Android as well. Android is another app that makes it easier to share files between Android-based Smartphones and PCs. Many of the major global industry players also contributed to this run by offering similar applications, like Google Drive — a cloud

Cloud brings the shift in software As is evident from trends, the software industry this year was driven by a need to increase mobility and accessibility to content that one could find on a desktop or similar systems. While cloud computing was the technology that helped us gain access to remote content, it also increased demand for applications and interfaces that make it easier to access remote content and perform tasks on their, handheld devices. The latest operating systems came with cloud computing support built-in. Windows 8, for instance, added support for logging in with a 'Microsoft account, which leads to carrying your customized settings easily to other Microsoft 8 devices. Its device cloud also allows uploading to and downloading content from your SkyDrive. Mountain Lion, on the other hand,

c. Red a cloud Document Library as part of It.F. OS to share documents over iCloud, hence

Storage service by Google that allows you to keep all your content online. Microsoft introduced People Hub as part of Windows 8, which allows you to connect to your friends through email, chat, call or any of the social networks from one single view. When it comes to desktoptablet browsers, Chrome ruled the game this year followed by Internet Explorer and Firefecc However, lE 10 is being closely followed to see if it will be a game anoer. Since it has been p7raarity designed for tablets. It provides multiple Gestures and touch-based browsing features. Making it one of the fastest browsers when it comes in tablets. With its 'Do Not Track feature enabled by default, IF 10 is also deemed to offer greater privacy.making it easier to sync documents between iOS and OS X Devices. Moreover, an API has also been introduced by Apple to allow developers to develop apps that work with iCloud.

Programming Software

The programming arena saw a slight shift when it came to ranking. C seems to be occupying the first spot in the year 2012, as compared to Java last year, which comes at second place this year. Programming languages continued to support features required for smart and cloud computing. Microsoft also launched Visual Studio 2012, encouraging developers to create apps that support Windows 8, and also the new generation-of tablets like Microsoft Surface, which is expected: to be released by the end of this year. To further motivate developers. Microsoft also issued a free express version to create desktop apps. Some new programming languages or their latest stable releases also surfaced this year. Whereas a few of them were worked upon so that they could be released next year. New programming languages like Mozilla Foundation's RUST, Google's Go and Scala are expected to make it easier to develop large 2 complex cloud-based apps.

Application software

This year various new desktops, Smart phone and tablet applications were introduced, while existing ones were enhanced to support the core focus area of the industry, making content readily accessible and easy to share with others. Some of the Smartphone apps that made it to the top include Flip board — an application to aggregate web content, be it text or videos in a magazine layout clipboard originally gained popularity as an IOS app, and was later released for Android as well. Android is another app that makes it easier to share files between Android-based Smart phones and PCs. Many of the major global industry players also contributed to this run by offering similar applications, storage service from Google that allows you to keep all your content online. Microsoft introduced People Hub as part of Windows 8. Which allows you to connect to your friends through email, chat, call or any of the social networks from one single view. When it comes to desktop/tablet browsers, Chrome ruled the game this year followed by Internet Explorer and Firefox.. However. IE 10 is being closely followed to see if it will be a game changer. Since it has been primarily designed for tablets. It provides multiple oestures and touch-based browsing features, making it one of the fastest browsers when it comes to tablets. With its 'Do Not Track' feature enabled by default. IE 10 is also deemed to offer greater privacy.

Cloud brings the shift in software

As is evident from trends, the software industry this year was driven by a need to increase mobility and accessibility to content that one could find on a desktop or similar systems. While cloud computing was the technology that helped us gain access to remote content, it also increased demand for applications and interfaces that make it easier to access -emotive content and perform tasks on -and held devices. The latest operating systems came with cloud computing support built-in. 'Windows 8, for instance, 41111=1/. Added support for logging in with a Microsoft account, which leads to carrying your customized settings easily to another I Microsoft 8 devices. Its device cloud also allows uploading to and clown loading content from your Sky Drive. Mountain Lion, on the other hand, offered A cloud Document Library as part of its OS to share documents over iCloud, hence making it easier to sync documents between iOS and OS X devices. Moreover, an API has also been introduced by Apple to allow developers to develop apps that work with icloud

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)