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A Manatee Moment to remember

Updated on June 1, 2012
Florida Mangroves
Florida Mangroves
Manatees at Wakulla State Park
Manatees at Wakulla State Park


We looked at each other from a few meters with the weeds swaying in the current. A school of small fish swam past but I hardly noticed them as I was awed by being so close to a Manatee. There was no feeling of danger as I faced this huge mammal, only about 3 meters away. We simply floated together until I realized that we were moving out of the demarked swimming area. I turned away to stay inside the markers and lifted my head to get my breath back as I realized I had not even been breathing for a while. I saw Audrey standing on the nearby floating stand and pointed down into the water to share the moment with her but then realized that only me and the Manatee could share it. This fresh water river where I had been snorkeling is in the Wakulla Springs State Park, in Florida, near Tallahassee.

During an earlier boat trip we had counted at least eight of these beautiful creatures, including a mother and calf. A few days earlier we had looked for them in the Suwannee River, but with no luck. Now we found them, and without planning to do so I had encountered one under water. He had perhaps out of curiosity moved into the area set aside for visitors to swim in. These mammals often come too close to the boats that take visitors out on the river and can then get injured by the propellers of the boats. The Park Rangers who take visitors out keep a careful eye out for them, wanting to show them to visitors who peer carefully into the water, but at the same time at all costs avoid injuring them. Unfortunately some of the fishermen and hunters who share the rivers with them are not as careful.

Manatees are the Florida State Marine Mammal and are herbivorous, so perhaps my Manatee was coming to feed on the grass in the swimming area. They are 10-12 feet in length and weigh up to 1800lbs so I was badly out sized and outweighed. Fortunately they are friendly and peaceful animals and so I in fact did not have to be afraid. They are also listed as endangered and so need to be protected. This Manatee moment can be listed as one of the magic moments on our road trip, and is up there with standing right next to the falling waters of Niagara Falls or paddle skiing with Dolphins at Nahoon Reef in East London.




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    • wetnosedogs profile image

      wetnosedogs 5 years ago from Alabama

      That sounds like fun. It is great that you had such a tremendous experience.

    • Johan Smulders profile image
      Author

      Johan Smulders 5 years ago from East London, South Africa

      Thanks, yes I was blessed and we need to warn people about the dangers of boats. Manatees are so defenseless. Thanks for your kind comment

    • yoginijoy profile image

      yoginijoy 5 years ago from Mid-Atlantic, USA

      You are so lucky! I have always wanted to swim with the manatees. I like to go see them by the Power Plant in winter since they like the warmer waters. They are so adorable. Please write more about them to educate folks about the boat danger to them. Excellent topic!

    • Johan Smulders profile image
      Author

      Johan Smulders 5 years ago from East London, South Africa

      It was a great experience. Thanks for the comment.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Voted awesome and up. I have yet to meet a manatee.

    • teacherjoe52 profile image

      teacherjoe52 5 years ago

      What a great experiance. I would love to swim with a manatee.

    • jdavis88 profile image

      jdavis88 5 years ago from Twitter @jdavis88hub

      Great hub. I live very close to this area and have been to Wakulla Springs several times. Hopefully you swam in the cold springs! Or did you take one of the boat tours to see all of the Alligators in the Wakulla River?