ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Ajmer, where Islam started its journey in India

Updated on July 29, 2011
The Dargah of Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti at Ajmer
The Dargah of Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti at Ajmer
The main entrance to the Dargah
The main entrance to the Dargah
The main entrance to the Dargah : another view
The main entrance to the Dargah : another view
Thecrowded alley to the Dargah
Thecrowded alley to the Dargah
Shops offering CHADAR-s to the devotees to buy
Shops offering CHADAR-s to the devotees to buy
The inner gate of the Dargah
The inner gate of the Dargah
Shopkeepers waiting for prospective buyers with offerings of flowers, mainly red & pink  roses
Shopkeepers waiting for prospective buyers with offerings of flowers, mainly red & pink roses
Dhai Din Ka Jhopra -- another attraction of Ajmer
Dhai Din Ka Jhopra -- another attraction of Ajmer
Another view of Dhai Din Ka Jhopra
Another view of Dhai Din Ka Jhopra
A Bird's- eye view of Ajmer from Nag Parvat (Snake Hills)
A Bird's- eye view of Ajmer from Nag Parvat (Snake Hills)

Ajmer is a holy city. It is holy to both Muslims & Hindus . It is famous for the Dargah of the famous Muslim saint Hazrat Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti (1142 – 1236 A.D.),who laid the permanent foundation of Islam in India. The Mughal Emperor Akbar was a staunch follower of the teachings of this saint.

The history of Ajmer is a colorful one. The city was originally constructed by the King Ajay Pal Chouhan in the 7th century A.D. Named after Ajay Pal, or most probably after the nearby Ajay Meru (Ajay Mountain), the city was originally called Ajay Meru. It was conquered by Muhammad Ghori of Ghazni in 1193 A.D. In 1398 the marauding soldiers of Taimur Lang destroyed Ajay Meru. The city was rebuilt by Rana Kumbh, the Rana of Mewar, & the Rajput Kings ruled over it briefly. Later it was taken over by the Sultans of Malwar (1470-1531 A.D.). It was then conquered by the Mughal Emperor Akbar who came here in 1561. Here at the Taragarh fort, Sir Thomas Roe , the British Emissary from King James I of England, first met Emperor Jahangir on 19th January, 1616 --- a meeting with a profound future impact on India’s political fortune.

Ajmer has many important tourist destinations including the Taragarh Fort, Akbar’s Palace, Jain Temple, Dhai Din Ka Jhopra & the majestic Ana Sagar Lake.

But the most important place for which Ajmer is famous is the Dargah of Khawaja Moinuddin Chisti, the great Muslim Saint & the Guru of Emperor Akbar. Respected by both Muslims & Hindus, the great saint who was known as Garib Nawaz ( the Protector of the Poor) came to India from Persia in 1192 A.D. He stayed here at Ajmer till his death in 1236 A.D.

The Dargah is situated inside a protected enclosure with several gates. The main gate , a gift from the Nizam of Hyderabad, is majestic. Inside , there is the Akbari Mosque & the Buland Darwaja. There is a second mosque, built by Emperor Shah Jahan in 1650 A.D.

The central building where the saint’s mortal remains were placed after his death has the tomb built of white marble. Devotees offer CHADAR & flowers here.

There are two huge Handa-s or cauldrons for cooking rice in the enclosure, with an astounding capacity of 120 & 80 Mounds (1 Mounds = 37 kgs). A gift from Emperor Akbar, these two monsters attract awe & respect to all.

Though over-crowded, the place strangely bestows a serene calmness in the mind of the visitor, whether a devotee or an ordinary tourist.

It is really worth visiting.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      raza 

      6 years ago

      naice images

    • Shibaditya Ray profile image

      Shibaditya Ray 

      7 years ago from Santiniketan

      Nice

    • dr.asiskchatterji profile imageAUTHOR

      dr.asiskchatterji 

      7 years ago

      Thank you Gautam for pointing the error. I've corrected the text. What I intended to say was that Akbar was a follower of the teachings of this great saint.

    • profile image

      gautam dasgupta 

      7 years ago

      Akbar ruled between 1556 to 1605 whereas Garib Nawab died in 1236 then how could he be Akbar's Guru??

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)