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Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Houston: Jesus Saves

Updated on March 29, 2020
Peggy W profile image

I live in Houston, and I have worked as a nurse. My interests include art, traveling, reading, gardening, cooking, and our wonderful pets.

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Houston
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Houston | Source

Eye-Catching Signage!

It is difficult to miss seeing the JESUS SAVES signage at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church. The sign is at the top of a tall tower on the large beautiful brick church in downtown Houston. At night the neon JESUS SAVES sign is even more prominent against darkened skies.

The location of this historic church could not be more dramatic. What serves as a contrasting backdrop to this place of worship are towering modern steel, glass, and concrete buildings.

Of course, when this house of worship was first built in the years 1875 to 1879, all of those tall surrounding buildings did not yet exist. The original church building was also not as large as it is today.

There is a Texas Historical Commission sign out in front of this place of worship. It is a Texas Historic Landmark and was recorded as such in 1994. The reasons for this go back to the days when slavery ended.

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston, Texas
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston, Texas | Source

A Texas Historical Landmark

On the Texas Historical Landmark sign the following is inscribed the following:

“Antioch Missionary Baptist Church

The Emancipation of slaves was heralded by Federal officials in Galveston on June 19, 1865. Antioch became Houston’s first African American Baptist Church when organized by nine former area slaves in 1866.”

Their first church in 1868 was built nearby.

The first official pastor was fellow church member Reverend John Henry Yates. It was due to his efforts that the church members paid money to purchase land and begin to build this church where it is situated today.

As mentioned above, it took four years to complete what was originally a one-story sanctuary at this location. It was designed by another fellow church member by the name of Richard Allen.

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston, Texas
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston, Texas | Source

The Architect

Architect Richard Allen was an impressive figure of a man!

He was a member of the Texas legislature (the 12th legislative session), and that was the first time blacks had ever served in that capacity. Richard Allen was a customs collector for the Port of Houston. Mr. Allen was also a “quartermaster for the black regiment of the Texas Militia.” He would have been known back in those days as a Buffalo Soldier. There is now a Buffalo Soldiers Museum in Houston that is full of history, such as what Mr. Allen would have experienced.

In reading about the construction of this church, it was indeed a labor of love and devotion. All of the bricks were handmade. Volunteer church members did this during their free time. The women would prepare and bring food to their men who were doing the labor.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Pretty stained glass windowsDetail image of the churchDetail view of the churchDetail view of the church
Pretty stained glass windows
Pretty stained glass windows | Source
Detail image of the church
Detail image of the church | Source
Detail view of the church
Detail view of the church | Source
Detail view of the church
Detail view of the church | Source

A Notable First

“It was the first brick structure built and owned by African-Americans in Houston.”

The pews were all handmade as well and are still serving current church members today. What a terrific, lasting legacy left behind by those first hard-working members of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church! This church is on the National Register of Historic Places as of 1976.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Church with the tall buildings as a backdrop in downtown Houston, TexasAntioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston
Church with the tall buildings as a backdrop in downtown Houston, Texas
Church with the tall buildings as a backdrop in downtown Houston, Texas | Source
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston | Source

In Addition to Spirituality

Reverend Yates was also hard-working and dedicated to helping his people in many ways beyond just their spiritual needs.

Many former slaves did not know how to read or write. Once they became free, most of them wanted to learn those necessary skills plus also learn how to do all types of jobs formerly forbidden to them.

Reverend Yates “led efforts to improve the education of Houston’s African Americans and helped establish the Houston Baptist Academy in 1885.”

Pastor Yates’s educational goals were to go far beyond merely the teaching of reading and writing. He wished for his people to be able to own and operate their businesses someday.

Houston College evolved from what once was the Houston Baptist Academy. Houston College later morphed into Texas Southern University, which still operates in Houston today, educating the youths of tomorrow.

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston | Source

Texas Southern University

It was at Texas Southern University where our friend and artist Charles Criner received his education. “Trying to Catch Freedom” is one of his lithography prints. The evolution of that particular print concerns itself with the struggles of slaves trying to become emancipated. It includes some history of the Underground Railroad.

The Texas Historical Commission sign goes on to say:

“It was enlarged in the 1890s and underwent major alterations in the 1930s. The nationally recognized Gothic revival masonry building features stained glass windows containing portraits of prominent church figures, steep cross gables, pointed arch windows and doors, and a distinctive neon “Jesus Saves” sign.”

Side view of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston
Side view of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in downtown Houston | Source

Fourth Ward of Houston and Freedmen’s Town

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church is in the Fourth Ward. It is where freed slaves began to congregate along the banks of Buffalo Bayou near what is now downtown Houston. It became labeled Freedmen’s Town.

The former slaves worked together to create bricks to pave the streets and build their shotgun houses. By the late 19th century, Freedmen’s Town became the heart of the African-American community.

Over the years, because of the proximity to downtown and rising land costs, much of the old historic neighborhood was transformed into a multi-ethnicity and more upscale residential and business area. A few landmark buildings remain along with some of those handmade brick streets. Sadly even those are under assault in the name of progress.

View of the church from another angle
View of the church from another angle | Source

Mother Church

The last part of the Texas Historical Commission sign has this posted:

“Once the center of a cohesive African American community, Antioch served as the mother church for many African American Baptist congregations. The church continues to provide leadership in religious, civic, and educational activities as Houston’s oldest and preeminent African American Baptist congregation.”

Antioch Park and Location

Just east of the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church is a 1.8-acre green space and public park called Antioch Park. People working in the Allen Center buildings look down upon it. Majestic old oak trees provide shade, and an elevated lawn area with concrete walls serves as seating areas. It provides respite for busy office workers or other passersby.

There are more Baptist churches in Houston than any other denomination. This particular one is beautiful as well as historical.

Location of this historic place of worship: 500 Clay Street, Houston, Texas 77002.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Trees in Antioch Park next to Antioch Missionary Baptist ChurchView of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church from Antioch Park
Trees in Antioch Park next to Antioch Missionary Baptist Church
Trees in Antioch Park next to Antioch Missionary Baptist Church | Source
View of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church from Antioch Park
View of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church from Antioch Park | Source
Source

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Peggy Woods

Comments

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    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      5 hours ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Liz,

      The setting is pretty spectacular! Thanks for reading this and leaving a comment.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      5 hours ago from UK

      I really enjoyed reading this article. What an amazing background and history to this church. The setting, dwarfed by giant skyscrapers, is stunning. You have captured it well in your excellent photos.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      7 hours ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Ruby,

      Thanks for your comment. Slavery is certainly a black mark on the history of our country.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Richert 

      8 hours ago from Southern Illinois

      This is a beautiful building, but the history is more beautiful. God bless all black people all over the world. The greedy plantation owners have much to repent for, plus our government who allowed slavery to happen.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      9 hours ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Bill,

      Yes, the setting is lovely. Of course when it was built, those skyscrapers did not yet exist.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      10 hours ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Manatita,

      It is impressive how this church was built. So glad you took the time to listen to the video.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      11 hours ago from Olympia, WA

      That photo of it standing among the skyscrapers is a classic shot. Love it!

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 

      14 hours ago from london

      I liked when the Rev Minister mentioned the word mankind. He also gave a welcome to everyone and spoke of the warmth of the people there. I have always loved baptists. When experience is that yes, they are very loving, very warm.

      Nice touch on slavery there and a way of how people from various vocations, came together for social, educational, economical and spiritual needs. An impressive church.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      22 hours ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello MG Singh,

      This church is historic and is surrounded by modern buildings which sets it apart. Happy to be able to show it to you and others who may never get to see it in person.

    • emge profile image

      MG Singh 

      25 hours ago from Singapore

      The church looks so beautiful amongst the modern buildings. It has a charm of its own. I don't know whether I will ever visit this church and for that reason, I am thankful to you to have introduced to a lovely piece of architecture.

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