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Colorado Wildflowers - Last Dollar Road near Telluride

Updated on July 1, 2013

General Information

This is an easy drive, although a 4WD is required if conditions are wet. In dry conditions, any SUV or 2WD can make it. The road is a bit bumpy in spots and very slick when wet. Whatever the road conditions, you will want to take it slow as the road can be narrow and oncoming traffic can appear suddenly around blind corners.

The terrain is a mix of beautiful meadow vistas and alpine forest. Views of the San Juan mountains across flowered meadows are spectacular.

Grab your camera and go check out the wildflowers. Here are some tips for taking better photos:

http://digital-photography-school.com/8-tips-for-photographing-wildflowers

Try this drive in late September or early October for the fall colors.

Remember to respect private land and leave no trace wherever you go.


Getting There

Drive south of Montrose on US 550 about twenty miles to Ridgeway, then turn west onto Colorado 62 for about ten miles over Dallas Divide at 8970 feet at the top. This is a scenic drive in itself, especially the view to the south along Dallas Divide. This is the most beautiful ranching country in the state, in my opinion.

Last Dollar Road can be accessed from two spots:

1. From Highway 62 about 12 miles west of Ridgway, just west of Dallas Divide

2. From Telluride via Highway 145, turn onto the airport road

If you have an iPhone or Android, you can download the EveryTrails app, then search for Last Dollar Road: http://www.everytrail.com/guide/last-dollar-4x4-road-Colorado

Hiking Trails

Hiking trails can be found along the way if you want to stretch your legs:

  • DEEP CREEK: This is a good trail for early and late season hiking due to its southern exposure and lower elevation.
  • WHIPPLE: This trail offers spectacular views of the Wilson Peak area and the La Sal Mountains in Eastern Utah.
  • ALDER CREEK: This trail is primarily in spruce and fir and enters the Mount Sneffels Wilderness area.

Hiking trails guide and map: http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5312123.pdf

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