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Five Things That Became Unexpectedly Famous in New Zealand

Updated on June 25, 2016

In New Zealand, we have become obsessed with the strangest of things and others have been unexpectedly brilliant. Here's Five things that kiwis made famous, sometimes overnight.

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Chocolate Milk

Yes, you heard it right. in 2014, local company Lewis Road Creamery created a brand of chocolate milk made entirely of locally owned Whittaker's chocolate. The response was insane! People were lining up waiting for supermarkets to open just so they could get their hands on the stuff. All the stores were limiting purchase to two bottles per person, because they were running out so fast, and being a small company, Lewis Road was struggling to keep up with the demand.

Nowadays, the milk can be found anywhere, and it tastes pretty delicious. Still, I am gobsmacked at how New Zealand reacted to it. You'd think we'd never tasted Nestlé before...

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Moustache Milk & Cookie Bar

Clearly we have an obsession with milk down under, but even before the doors opened on this locally owned business (and a New Zealand first, might I add), the Facebook followers had jumped up into the thousands. The poor little shop kept running out of cookies when they first opened, and they didn't have big enough ovens to compensate. But to be honest, they are the most delectable cookies you have ever seen. Red Velvet Cookie, Snicker Cookies, Creme Brulee Cookies...

As well as all that, they joined with a beer company to create...wait for it...Cookie flavoured beer! Totally genius marketing. Four Years On, they now have a stall at the University of Auckland and a bus that travels around Wellington.

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Bungy Jumping

An oldie, but a goodie, New Zealand has taken an unusual cultural tradition in Vanuatu and turned it into a tourist attraction. Bungy Jumping is when adrenaline junkies attach themselves to a rope and jump off a bridge or building. They dangle upside down for a while and then are pulled back up. It's a strange tradition, but it's become a popular commercial enterprise since 1988 thanks to A J Hackett and a bunch of crazy kiwis who took a chance on throwing themselves off high places for fun.

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Jamie Curry

Well, of course the prominence of Jamie's World on YouTube is no surprise to the world now, but back in the day, this girl was just your average kiwi teenager with a wicked sense of humour. Now, she's tearing up the world with her deadpan humour shared with millions of subscribers. How did she do it? She just started sharing hilarious memes she made up with her friends, and they would share it with theirs, and so on and so forth.

Unwitting celebrity or total social media genius? One can only wonder.

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Zorb

Zorbs are giant hamster balls for humans that roll you down a hill at 50kph. Not surprisingly, these became famous in New Zealand. This is probably to do with the fact that kiwis love to be reasonably safe (it's a giant padded ball) while scaring themselves stupid on a boring farmyard. (there is only sheep there after all). Zorbs have been a popular attraction since the '90s and have since spread all over the world.

Would you line up outside a supermarket for chocolate milk?

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    • Coffeequeeen profile image

      Louise Powles 

      15 months ago from Norfolk, England

      I wouldn't mind trying bungy jumping!

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