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Paris; A Photographic Guide to Artistry and Architecture in the City

Updated on November 07, 2015
Greensleeves Hubs profile image

The author has travelled extensively in the world, and writes illustrated articles about his experiences, with advice on must-see sights

The Eiffel Tower - fine architecture and also a glittering display of lights
The Eiffel Tower - fine architecture and also a glittering display of lights

ORNAMENTATIONS, CEILING PAINTINGS, STAINED GLASS AND GLITTERING LIGHTS

This is a photographic record in 3 pages of a 3 day vacation in Paris, focusing on the main tourist sites, and the challenges and possibilities for photographers. This is Page 3.

INTRODUCTION

In September 2011 I spent three days in the city of Paris, Capital of France and regarded by many as the most romantic city on Earth. It was, as I say, only three days, so for me it became something of a whistle-stop tour, cramming as much into the time available, with my eye pressed too often to the viewfinder of my camera, when perhaps I should have been taking in the whole city panorama, and cementing memories of Paris in my mind. (But then, photography is my hobby, so that's what I do).

The first two pages are a brief record of the major attractions - the world famous landmarks to be found in the heart of the city around the River Seine, and further afield towards the outskirts of the city. This third page is a little different. Think of Notre Dame and you may think of a great stone cathedral. Think of the Eiffel Tower and you may think of a mass of iron girders held together with nuts and bolts. But these buildings are not simply the product of stone masons and metal workers - they are also the product of architects and designers and artists.

In this third page I look at the details which make buildings like this, not just great constructions, but great works of art. I look at the engravings, adornments, statues and internal decorations which make excellent subjects for photography. And - as in the other two pages - I also include accompanying notes on a few of the challenges involved in taking these photographs as seen from the point of view of an amateur with limited technical skills, but hopefully some compositional ability.

Using the example of Paris, the aim of all three pages is to encourage everyone to try a fresh approach to their photography when on vacation, and make the most of their holiday time in creating a lasting memory of the experience.

  • All photos on this page were taken by the author between 5th and 7th Sept 2011

A gargoyle at Sacre-Coure. When taking a photo like this, usually it is best to take up a position which ensures the sky is behind the gargoyle to avoid the subject matter being lost against the stonework of the building
A gargoyle at Sacre-Coure. When taking a photo like this, usually it is best to take up a position which ensures the sky is behind the gargoyle to avoid the subject matter being lost against the stonework of the building

HISTORIC CARVINGS

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Detailed carvings over the entrance gate to The Louvre in ParisThe Portal of St Anne - engraved images on the left portal on the west face of Notre-DameOne of the great rose windows on the facade of Notre-Dame CathedralThe Gallery of Kings carved out of the facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral's West FaceThe victories (never the defeats) of Napoleon Bonaparte adorn the Arc de Triomphe
Detailed carvings over the entrance gate to The Louvre in Paris
Detailed carvings over the entrance gate to The Louvre in Paris
The Portal of St Anne - engraved images on the left portal on the west face of Notre-Dame
The Portal of St Anne - engraved images on the left portal on the west face of Notre-Dame
One of the great rose windows on the facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral
One of the great rose windows on the facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral
The Gallery of Kings carved out of the facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral's West Face
The Gallery of Kings carved out of the facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral's West Face
The victories (never the defeats) of Napoleon Bonaparte adorn the Arc de Triomphe
The victories (never the defeats) of Napoleon Bonaparte adorn the Arc de Triomphe

MODERN DESIGN

The frames of metal and panes of glass in the modern design of the Louvre Pyramid
The frames of metal and panes of glass in the modern design of the Louvre Pyramid

PHOTOGRAPHING ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL

Every tourist in Paris takes photos of the famous buildings, and most of the photos end up looking the same. So try to be just a bit different and look beyond the whole building. Look at the detail as well.

When taking photos of great buildings, never confine yourself to the whole of the edifice. Of course the building in its entirety is what makes it great, but if it's a famous palace or a monument or a tower, everybody already knows what it looks like in the whole. Look just a bit closer. And use a telephoto lens and look upwards. The beauty of many historic buildings is not in the building blocks of which it is made; it is more often in the fine craftmanship and artistry of sculptors and carvers.

Consider the attention to detail that went into the creating of these works of art, some of which are virtually invisible to the naked eye at ground level - some of which, indeed, were intended only for the eyes of God. And consider the peril to which the artists and artisans subjected themselves in the days before proper scaffolding and safety harnesses.

One simple tip when taking pictures of sculptures and engravings - capturing detail in these kinds of works of art is best done not with the sun lighting them directly, but slightly from the side to create shadow and to show textures in the work.

The modern design of the Louvre pyramid, erected in 1988, set against the traditional stone work of the historic building behind. You can decide for yourself if the juxtaposition of ancient and modern works in this instance
The modern design of the Louvre pyramid, erected in 1988, set against the traditional stone work of the historic building behind. You can decide for yourself if the juxtaposition of ancient and modern works in this instance
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Louis XIV's Chapel at the Palace of Versailles, built in the early years of the 18th centuryNot an exciting view, but I like the composition with the ceiling below and the windows aboveLighting was a problem here, to show detail in both the painting, and the wall decorationPay attention to angles in photos like this so the walls look like they are vertical!The entrance to the Hall of Mirrors, arguably the most famous of Versailles's state rooms
Louis XIV's Chapel at the Palace of Versailles, built in the early years of the 18th century
Louis XIV's Chapel at the Palace of Versailles, built in the early years of the 18th century
Not an exciting view, but I like the composition with the ceiling below and the windows above
Not an exciting view, but I like the composition with the ceiling below and the windows above
Lighting was a problem here, to show detail in both the painting, and the wall decoration
Lighting was a problem here, to show detail in both the painting, and the wall decoration
Pay attention to angles in photos like this so the walls look like they are vertical!
Pay attention to angles in photos like this so the walls look like they are vertical!
The entrance to the Hall of Mirrors, arguably the most famous of Versailles's state rooms
The entrance to the Hall of Mirrors, arguably the most famous of Versailles's state rooms

INTERNAL DÉCOR

Whatever the craft work which goes into creating the exterior of a building, it has to weather the elements of rain, wind and possibly ice. Therefore the finery can never quite match that which is possible in the sheltered interior.

Of all the subject matter on this page, photographing the internal architecture and décor of buildings probably seems like the easiest, but in fact is the most difficult. The reason is light. Rooms simply are not as well lit as the great outdoors, and that means using flash (the effects of which are difficult to predict and control) or a slow shutter speed (in which case camera shake becomes a big problem; a tripod is not always practical for a tourist to carry). For some of these shots I increased the ISO setting (equivalent to film speed) from 100 to 400 or 800, which can make the shot grainy, but does allow for faster shutter speeds in low light.

All of the images here feature the galleries, bedrooms and chapel of the Palace of Versailles.

Ceiling and wall art can be among the most beautiful of subjects to photograph
Ceiling and wall art can be among the most beautiful of subjects to photograph
'Abundance and Liberality'. The Venus Room at the Palace of Versailles, painted by Rene-Antoine Houasse in 1683
'Abundance and Liberality'. The Venus Room at the Palace of Versailles, painted by Rene-Antoine Houasse in 1683
'Apotheosis of Hercules'. The Hercules Salon at the Palace of Versailles, painted by Francois Lemoyne, 1733-1736
'Apotheosis of Hercules'. The Hercules Salon at the Palace of Versailles, painted by Francois Lemoyne, 1733-1736

WALL AND CEILING ART

Whilst on the subject of the Palace of Versailles, the building is of course, noted for its artwork in the many rooms of the palace, and people go to view the paintings and sculptures. But particularly attractive - and a part of the real fabric of the building rather than a mere painting which could be detached and hung up in any other palace at a moment’s notice - is the wall and ceiling art.

This section features further art from the Palace of Versailles, and in this case all of these photos show ceiling art. As with the previous section, light is the problem. In these particular rooms the windows are large, and allow in a reasonable amount of natural light, so with a high ISO setting, it really wasn't too difficult to take photos like this without flash, and without a very long exposure which induces camera shake. The biggest problem might be to avoid getting a cricked neck!

One tip is to take short notes of the descriptive panels, or better still take photos as this is a quicker option. Then at a later date you can easily access the information about the history of the works of art you have imaged. Almost any photograph of any subject, is so much more interesting if you have the data to go with it.

This is another detail from 'Apotheosis of Hercules' by Francois Lemoyne (see caption above). If photographing wall or ceiling art, don't necessarily shoot the whole thing; concentrate on the detail
This is another detail from 'Apotheosis of Hercules' by Francois Lemoyne (see caption above). If photographing wall or ceiling art, don't necessarily shoot the whole thing; concentrate on the detail
Click thumbnail to view full-size
A statue on the Church of Sacre-Coeur. As with the gargoyle above, it helps the image for the statue to stand out from the building, with a good dynamic pose, sword held highA statue on the roof of the Louvre. It's less dramatic than the preceding shot, but a figure looking down on the photographer from on high is more imposing than a figure shot at eye levelAnother particularly ornate statue from the Louvre museum. A good telephoto lens is required for images like this, unless you can crop and magnify them in an editing programmeIn this case, the statue does not stand out so much because it's slightly camoflagued against the building. It's OK, but maybe if the building had been out of focus it would be better?A different approach which can be effective is to view the statue in its 'natural surroundings' as in this example with Versailles behind the 17th C statue of Le Rhone, by Jean Baptiste Tuby.
A statue on the Church of Sacre-Coeur. As with the gargoyle above, it helps the image for the statue to stand out from the building, with a good dynamic pose, sword held high
A statue on the Church of Sacre-Coeur. As with the gargoyle above, it helps the image for the statue to stand out from the building, with a good dynamic pose, sword held high
A statue on the roof of the Louvre. It's less dramatic than the preceding shot, but a figure looking down on the photographer from on high is more imposing than a figure shot at eye level
A statue on the roof of the Louvre. It's less dramatic than the preceding shot, but a figure looking down on the photographer from on high is more imposing than a figure shot at eye level
Another particularly ornate statue from the Louvre museum. A good telephoto lens is required for images like this, unless you can crop and magnify them in an editing programme
Another particularly ornate statue from the Louvre museum. A good telephoto lens is required for images like this, unless you can crop and magnify them in an editing programme
In this case, the statue does not stand out so much because it's slightly camoflagued against the building. It's OK, but maybe if the building had been out of focus it would be better?
In this case, the statue does not stand out so much because it's slightly camoflagued against the building. It's OK, but maybe if the building had been out of focus it would be better?
A different approach which can be effective is to view the statue in its 'natural surroundings' as in this example with Versailles behind the 17th C statue of Le Rhone, by Jean Baptiste Tuby.
A different approach which can be effective is to view the statue in its 'natural surroundings' as in this example with Versailles behind the 17th C statue of Le Rhone, by Jean Baptiste Tuby.

STATUE PHOTOGRAPHY (1)

Statues can make good subjects for photography, and Paris has more than its fair share. They are not always the easiest of subjects however. The problem, more often than not, is the backdrop. A grey stone statue against a grey stone building just doesn’t look good. Nor does an ancient historical figure look right if the family Citroen or Renault is parked behind it or in front. The solution is often to get down low and point the camera upwards. This can more often than not remove the unwanted intrusion of 21st century society, or the camouflaging effects of the surrounding buildings. It can also give the subject of the statue a more imposing and dynamic appearance. The downside of such an approach is that the sky may be rather boring - nothing kills a good photographic subject more than a blank white sky behind it. So try to ensure there is some colour to the sky. Also, contrast between a light sky and a dark statue can play havoc with the camera’s exposure readings.

There's a lot of activity going on in this sculpture, and it's difficult to find a camera angle which captures it all. However, shooting directly up shows the power of the rearing horses at their best - which is just what the sculptor was aiming for
There's a lot of activity going on in this sculpture, and it's difficult to find a camera angle which captures it all. However, shooting directly up shows the power of the rearing horses at their best - which is just what the sculptor was aiming for
'Immortality outstripping Time'  shown above and on Page 1 is an impressive sculpture. I think the ominously dark sky actually helps to dramatise the action in the statue here
'Immortality outstripping Time' shown above and on Page 1 is an impressive sculpture. I think the ominously dark sky actually helps to dramatise the action in the statue here
Click thumbnail to view full-size
The majestic statue of Louis XIV at the Palace of Versailles. Looking up from below makes him look most imposing, but you can either have the statue with the horse facing the camera ...... or you can have the statue with the king facing the camera. I think this is probably the better composition, though neither shows all the detail as well as I would likeA statue on the roof of Sacre-Coeur. I really like the form of this statue, but detail and exposure is not good, even after digital manipulation. One that I will attempt again, if ever I return One of the statues on the Pont Alexander III Bridge. Not an exciting composition, but with a nice contrast between the gold figure, the grey plinth and the blue skyAnd finally the odd one out. not a real statue at all, but a living statue; one of the street entertainers to be found at Sacre-Coeur, all happy to pose for photos (and a few coins).
The majestic statue of Louis XIV at the Palace of Versailles. Looking up from below makes him look most imposing, but you can either have the statue with the horse facing the camera ...
The majestic statue of Louis XIV at the Palace of Versailles. Looking up from below makes him look most imposing, but you can either have the statue with the horse facing the camera ...
... or you can have the statue with the king facing the camera. I think this is probably the better composition, though neither shows all the detail as well as I would like
... or you can have the statue with the king facing the camera. I think this is probably the better composition, though neither shows all the detail as well as I would like
A statue on the roof of Sacre-Coeur. I really like the form of this statue, but detail and exposure is not good, even after digital manipulation. One that I will attempt again, if ever I return
A statue on the roof of Sacre-Coeur. I really like the form of this statue, but detail and exposure is not good, even after digital manipulation. One that I will attempt again, if ever I return
One of the statues on the Pont Alexander III Bridge. Not an exciting composition, but with a nice contrast between the gold figure, the grey plinth and the blue sky
One of the statues on the Pont Alexander III Bridge. Not an exciting composition, but with a nice contrast between the gold figure, the grey plinth and the blue sky
And finally the odd one out. not a real statue at all, but a living statue; one of the street entertainers to be found at Sacre-Coeur, all happy to pose for photos (and a few coins).
And finally the odd one out. not a real statue at all, but a living statue; one of the street entertainers to be found at Sacre-Coeur, all happy to pose for photos (and a few coins).

STATUE PHOTOGRAPHY (2)

In the previous section I mentioned some of the problems with statue photography. In the examples here, I think some of these issues have been addressed, though not all are really satisfactory. Perhaps the biggest issue is contrast, and the related matter of detail. Statues of people or animals inevitably do not have quite so much detail or subtle variation in colour as the real thing, and when exposure problems resulting from a contrasty background - particularly a dark statue against a pale sky - are thrown into the mix, then all detail can be lost.

So when photographing statues, think about the background and whether a different shooting position can improve it. Think about whether a different angle can also make the statue appear more dramatic or imposing. A different angle, or a different time of day, may also allow the light to show more detail in the statue. Think about whether flash will lighten the statue, and allow you to throw a distracting background into shadow. And maybe work on the image in a photo editing programme to fine-tune what you've produced.

I'm far from happy with all these images, though I think I can highlight where they work, and where they can be improved. Do try statue photography however, because when done well, such images can be striking and imposing expressions of the power, the emotion or the action which the original artist was trying to convey, and they can certainly add something to any record of a visit to a historic site.

The brilliantly coloured stained glass windows of Notre Dame
The brilliantly coloured stained glass windows of Notre Dame
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Stained glass image in Notre DameStained glass windows of Notre DameStained glass image in Notre DameStained glass windows of Notre DameStained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass windows of Notre Dame
Stained glass windows of Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass windows of Notre Dame
Stained glass windows of Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame
Stained glass image in Notre Dame

STAINED GLASS WINDOWS

To anyone who has not yet attempted it, I would suggest the art of medieval stained glass is one of the most beautiful of all photographic subjects. It is also a surprisingly easy subject for photography. Focusing is not really a problem, because there is no depth of field in a stained glass window. And exposure is also less of a problem than one might expect in what may well be the darkened interior of a church. Best imaged with the sun shining through the window to show off the intensity of colour to the greatest effect, one can just expose off the glass - the sunlight will give a slightly false reading leading to underexposure, but underexposure in this case only serves to enhance the colours of the glass even more.

But if you have the facility, do bracket the exposures to ensure a good image. And as usual, think about composition. Pick out details from the glass, rather than trying to image the whole window.

More stained glass from Notre-Dame
More stained glass from Notre-Dame
The central detail of the stained glass of Notre-Dame's great south rose window
The central detail of the stained glass of Notre-Dame's great south rose window

STAINED GLASS AT NOTRE DAME

As for beauty, well, the hard work there has already been done for you by the artist who created the work all those centuries ago; all the photographer has to do is reproduce it.

All of these pictures were taken in the Cathedral of Notre Dame, though the stained glass at the nearby Sainte-Chappelle is reputedly even better.

Modern day artist at work in Montmartre. But today of course, the work is for the tourists
Modern day artist at work in Montmartre. But today of course, the work is for the tourists

'MODERN' ART ON SHOW IN MONTMARTRE

And now a few photos, not of art, but of artists at work. The artist’s quarter of Montmartre is famous as the one time haunt of Toulouse Lautrec, Degas and Van Gogh, and many others. Today, the area may be better described as the 'tourist’s quarter', because that’s why the artists are there today, not to create immortal works of beauty, but to sell to the foreigners. That may sound a bit cynical, and maybe it is, though I’m sure some of the folk applying paint to canvas are here not just to make money but to feel inspired by the legendary artists of the heyday of Montmartre. And the art which some produce, at least to my untutored eye, looks every bit as accomplished as some of the work of the great masters.

Artist at work on Montmartre's most famous building - the Church of Sacre-Coeur. I wonder how many times he's painted this scene?
Artist at work on Montmartre's most famous building - the Church of Sacre-Coeur. I wonder how many times he's painted this scene?
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The Eiffel Tower at nightThe Eiffel Tower at nightThe Eiffel Tower at nightThe Eiffel Tower at nightThe Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night
The Eiffel Tower at night

THE ART OF THE EIFFEL TOWER

The Eiffel Tower at night puts on a display which has to be seen. Many thousands of bulbs light up the famous tower, and every hour, additional 'fairy lights' burst into twinkling action to create a beautiful effect. Photography at night, of course, is not so easy. A tripod is ideal, but without a tripod, just steady the camera as best you can, maybe employing a car roof or railings for support, and then use the shortest exposure you can, to minimise camera shake.

Some would question whether this is art - it is, after all, just a bunch of light bulbs put together by electricians - but it’s beautiful and it’s original, and it’s created by man; so as far as I am concerned that makes it art.

And romantic too; if I had a girl on my arm, I could sit all night on the grass just staring at this glittering sight (the girl would probably walk off bored silly after an hour, but I could sit all night!)

Architectural design, intricacy of structure, expert workmanship and an attractive light show, all come together in the Eiffel Tower at night
Architectural design, intricacy of structure, expert workmanship and an attractive light show, all come together in the Eiffel Tower at night

CONCLUSIONS

This concludes the third of my three pages about photography in the City of Paris.

I have been at pains throughout these three pages not to make great claims. The images are only the product of an amateur with limited opportunity and some limitations on equipment (no tripod / no wide angle lens). I did only have 3 days in Paris, and the weather, and the needs of the tour party I was with, were not always kind to me. (Well, that gets my excuses out of the way).

But I would hope that some of the images are attractive and competently taken. The intention is not to inform serious photographers; the intention is to encourage the vast majority of ordinary tourists to try to get something more out of their vacations. To look beyond the simple 'take-one-shot-and-hope-it's-not-too-bad' mentality. To train the eye to seek out the detail and appreciate beauty in that detail which others overlook. To aim for a record of a once in a lifetime holiday which truly reflects what you have seen and experienced on the holiday. To return home, not with a few snapshots of someone's head in front of the Eiffel Tower, but with images which really tell you something about the places you went, and images which you can feel proud to have taken. Thank you for reading.

PLEASE ADD COMMENTS IF YOU WILL. THANKS, ALUN

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    • Greensleeves Hubs profile image
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      Greensleeves Hubs 2 years ago from Essex, UK

      Adventuretravels; Thank you so much. It was an enjoyable page to write and illustrate, and hopefully it helps to give a few ideas to holiday makers who want to take photos which go beyond the simple snapshot.

      Your comment is very flattering Giovanna, but warms my heart! Cheers, Alun

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      Giovanna Sanguinetti 2 years ago from London UK

      Fabulous work - a really fabulous Hub - you set yourself a difficult task and executed it beautifully.

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      Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK

      Glimmer Twin Fan; thanks very much for your visit and comment. I appreciate it. Stained glass is one subject which works so well both in the original art form, and in the photographic reproduction. The trick with photography of course is to try to reflect the intensity of colour which is achieved when sunlight streams through a stained glass window. Alun.

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      Greensleeves Hubs 4 years ago from Essex, UK

      Suzie HQ, I thank you so much for those very kind comments and compliments.

      I suppose a theme I always like to explore with travel guides, is to encourage tourists to a locality to get the very most they can out of the visit (I am sure from your hubs, that you feel the same way). Photography is just one way in which people can get so much more out of a vacation, as well as a permanent lasting record to keep the memories fresh, so it's nice to write about this aspect.

      Once again, thanks so much for viewing (and sharing). Alun.

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      Glimmer Twin Fan 4 years ago

      Just beautiful! The stained glass was lovely.

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 4 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Wow Alun, what an incredible hub, the thought and detail you have put in is fantastic. Your photos are such a compliment to all the talented Artists that shaped these inspiring buildings, statues and windows of Paris. You are truly talented Alun. I love the way you explain how to get the best out of architectural photos which can make such a difference. All of your photos are fantastic, in particular I love the ceiling and wall art in The Palace of Versaille and the stained glass in Notre-Dame. Having never been to Paris ( its on my long list!) this hub brings aspects of the great city to me in beautiful detail. Voted across and will be sharing:)

    • Greensleeves Hubs profile image
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      Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK

      Thank you Cogerson for your kind comments about the page and the photos. Always a real pleasure to hear from you. Alun.

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      Cogerson 5 years ago from Virginia

      Excellent job with this hub...you made me feel like I was experiencing Paris...thanks for sharing these awesome photos.

    • Greensleeves Hubs profile image
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      Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK

      Thanks very much K9 for your comments about the photography, and appreciation that buildings and architecture are not necessarily quite as easy to image as many might suppose. For the record, my usual equipment currently is a Canon EOS 40D SLR with two zoom lenses, and (though not on this trip) an old Pentax SLR with a wide angle lens.

    • K9keystrokes profile image

      India Arnold 5 years ago from Northern, California

      Loved the interior shots of Louis XIV's Chapel, amazing and NOT an easy shoot. I thought you did a really good job of shooting the exterior architecture free from parallax error...no easy task without a 4X5 camera! Impressive work.

      Cheers~

      K9

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      Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK

      Derdriu; as ever, thanks so much for your nice comments on this hub, as on the others you've read. At least now I've finished the third Paris hub, I can maybe concentrate on some of those other pages I'm writing!

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      Greensleeves Hubs 5 years ago from Essex, UK

      Thankyou dmdiaz and to punacoast for visiting my page and commenting. I really appreciate your nice words. It makes writing the page seem worthwhile!

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      Derdriu 5 years ago

      Alun/Greensleeves Hubs: What a clearly explained, gorgeously illustrated and logically organized hub! It is a brisk talent to size up what is to be photographed, note what will have enduring meaning, and photograph accordingly. Your emphasis on the recognition of what gives and re-gives the personal sense of place is most helpful.

      Thank you for the tour, the photos and the insights since "Paris veult une photo!"

      Voted up, etc.,

      Derdriu

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      Viet Doan 5 years ago from Big Island, Hawaii

      Fantastic pictures of the stained glass windows of Notre Dame! You have good eye for details Greensleeves. I really enjoyed your tips on taking architectural photos. Excellent hub!

    • dmdiaz profile image

      dmdiaz 5 years ago

      Excellent work!

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