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Visit the Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, South Dakota: Walk Among Wooly Mammoth Fossils

Updated on February 3, 2017
FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway welcomes the opportunity to travel both stateside and abroad and especially enjoys documenting her fun through photography.

Don't Miss the Wooly Mammoths of South Dakota

The Mammoth Site is an active paleontological dig site, meaning you can watch scientists dig for the mammoth fossils that are partially exposed in the earth. There are also assembled mammoth skeletons. The project is housed in a large building.
The Mammoth Site is an active paleontological dig site, meaning you can watch scientists dig for the mammoth fossils that are partially exposed in the earth. There are also assembled mammoth skeletons. The project is housed in a large building. | Source

Fossil Finds: Mammoth Adventures Await in South Dakota

Vacationing in South Dakota? Well, if you leave without visiting the Mammoth Site in Hot Springs, you might as well turn around and head right back. The Mammoth Site is a world-class museum that displays Columbian and wooly mammoth bones "in situ" — that is, as they were originally positioned in the sinkhole when the animals met their fates 26,000 years ago. The museum is both educational and mesmerizing.

In the hour or two that it takes to tour the site, watch paleontologists and citizen volunteers at work as they patiently unearth fossils. Just feet away, researchers work with brushes and chisels to carefully coax bones from their dusty graves.

Follow a tour guide around the winding walkways and view fossils close-up. Take photos, ask questions, and imagine what it was like as these animals struggled for their lives and eventually became trapped in this once-thriving watering hole thousands of years ago.

Wooly Bully No More

Wooly mammoths once roamed North America along with their larger, less hairy cousins, the Columbian mammoths
Wooly mammoths once roamed North America along with their larger, less hairy cousins, the Columbian mammoths | Source

Planning on visiting South Dakota?

Plan your trip at https://www.travelsouthdakota.com

An Unusual Find

Mammoth bones are one of those needle-in-a-haystack finds. They were discovered in Hot Springs, South Dakota, by a construction worker in 1974 while preparing land for a new housing development. The man unearthed odd-looking bones that later turned out to include a mammoth tooth.

After additional digging revealed a complete mammoth skull and tusk, local citizens rallied to form The Mammoth Site, now a 501(c)(3) organization. Rather than exploiting the unusual find for personal gain, the landowner graciously left the mammoth remains in place and sold the land to the non-profit organization at cost. Today, the in situ site is 35-67 feet deep, and has yielded 61 mammoths to date.

During their average lifespan, mammoths replaced their molars six times.  Over time, their molars grew larger and had more ridges.
During their average lifespan, mammoths replaced their molars six times. Over time, their molars grew larger and had more ridges. | Source

A Museum and Working Dig Site

A building now encapsulates the active dig site so that paleontological research can take place year-round. Scientists from around the world visit the site each July to participate in research, and citizens can even volunteer to take part in field research at the site through the EarthWatch Institute.

Visitors to the Mammoth Site museum gain a unique understanding about mammoths, paleontology and our changing world. I especially liked that the museum provoked thought and conversation by presenting multiple competing scientific arguments (see table below).

This bone shelter is an example of how early humans used mammoths for survival.
This bone shelter is an example of how early humans used mammoths for survival. | Source
Some Of the Museum's Displays Include
competing perspectives about what caused the mammoths' extinction
fossilized teeth, bones, and replica skeletons
films and visuals about preserved Ice Age mammoths
thought provoking questions about whether scientists ethically should clone the mammoth (since it's an ever-increasing technological possibility)
interactive programs/activities for children
information on how humans depended on mammoths for survival.
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Here is one of the 61 fossilized mammoths that died on its side in the sink hole while struggling to get free.  Researchers nicknamed him "Murray."Male Columbian mammoths were about 13 feet (4 m) tall at the shoulders.  Male wooly mammoths were about 9-11 feet (2.7-3.4 m) tall at the shoulders (about the size of a modern African elephant, by comparison).Pictured here is a replica mammoth skeleton 26,000 years in the making. The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the closest living relative of the mammoths.The lifespan of wooly mammoths was about 60 years and Columbian mammoths was about 80 years.  However, all of the mammoths who died in the sink hole were juvenile males.When mammoths slept, they hung their trunks on their tusks so that insects didn't crawl up their noses.Mammoths used their tusks to gather food, as weapons and as displays, in attracting mates and warding off rivals. The work to unearth fossils is detailed and deliberate so as not to destroy 26,000 years of history.This fossilized giant short-faced bear was also found in the sinkhole.  In the background is a picture of what it looked like in life, thousands of years ago.This is a fossilized skull of a giant short-faced bear on display at the Mammoth Site.  Short-faced bears were once powerful carnivores.
Here is one of the 61 fossilized mammoths that died on its side in the sink hole while struggling to get free.  Researchers nicknamed him "Murray."
Here is one of the 61 fossilized mammoths that died on its side in the sink hole while struggling to get free. Researchers nicknamed him "Murray." | Source
Male Columbian mammoths were about 13 feet (4 m) tall at the shoulders.  Male wooly mammoths were about 9-11 feet (2.7-3.4 m) tall at the shoulders (about the size of a modern African elephant, by comparison).
Male Columbian mammoths were about 13 feet (4 m) tall at the shoulders. Male wooly mammoths were about 9-11 feet (2.7-3.4 m) tall at the shoulders (about the size of a modern African elephant, by comparison). | Source
Pictured here is a replica mammoth skeleton 26,000 years in the making. The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the closest living relative of the mammoths.
Pictured here is a replica mammoth skeleton 26,000 years in the making. The Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is the closest living relative of the mammoths. | Source
Source
The lifespan of wooly mammoths was about 60 years and Columbian mammoths was about 80 years.  However, all of the mammoths who died in the sink hole were juvenile males.
The lifespan of wooly mammoths was about 60 years and Columbian mammoths was about 80 years. However, all of the mammoths who died in the sink hole were juvenile males. | Source
Source
When mammoths slept, they hung their trunks on their tusks so that insects didn't crawl up their noses.
When mammoths slept, they hung their trunks on their tusks so that insects didn't crawl up their noses. | Source
Source
Mammoths used their tusks to gather food, as weapons and as displays, in attracting mates and warding off rivals.
Mammoths used their tusks to gather food, as weapons and as displays, in attracting mates and warding off rivals. | Source
The work to unearth fossils is detailed and deliberate so as not to destroy 26,000 years of history.
The work to unearth fossils is detailed and deliberate so as not to destroy 26,000 years of history. | Source
This fossilized giant short-faced bear was also found in the sinkhole.  In the background is a picture of what it looked like in life, thousands of years ago.
This fossilized giant short-faced bear was also found in the sinkhole. In the background is a picture of what it looked like in life, thousands of years ago. | Source
This is a fossilized skull of a giant short-faced bear on display at the Mammoth Site.  Short-faced bears were once powerful carnivores.
This is a fossilized skull of a giant short-faced bear on display at the Mammoth Site. Short-faced bears were once powerful carnivores. | Source

Titans of the Ice Age: No Match for This Deathly Sink Hole

One hundred twenty-two tusks belonging to 61 individual Columbian and wooly mammoths have been identified at the site. Additionly, there are remains of a giant short-faced bear, camel, llama, prairie dog and other fossilized creatures. Scientists believe these animals met their deaths over a period of about 1,000 years, starting about 26,000 years ago when they fell into a watering hole 65 feet deep.

The unsuspecting animals were enticed by the spring-fed pond with its warm water and vegetation. Mammoths and other animals climbed into the steep pit. Once inside, however, they became trapped when they couldn't find a foothold to climb out. Ultimately, they drowned, starved, or died of exhaustion. Imagine their panic.

Over the years, their bones became entombed in mud, fossilizing and becoming part of the earth around them. Sediment as well as the bodies of other animals accumulated in this natural death pit. Even these great beasts, the titans of the Ice Age, posed no match for this sink hole of death.

The Mammoth Site: Window to the Past

Don't miss the opportunity to step back into time and view mammoths in their final resting place.  The Mammoth Site will intrigue, teach, and make you think.
Don't miss the opportunity to step back into time and view mammoths in their final resting place. The Mammoth Site will intrigue, teach, and make you think. | Source

Did You Know?

Scientists genetically mapped the woolly mammoth's DNA and found it to be 99.40% identical to the African elephant.

Comparing Woolly Mammoths and Columbian Mammoths

 
Wooly Mammoth
Columbian Mammoth
Height
approximately the same size as modern African elephants (males 9-11 ft at shoulder, females 8.5-9.5 ft)
13 ft at the shoulder
Weight
6 tons (males)
10 tons (males)
Fur
covered in an overcoat of long guard hairs up to 3 ft long with a thick undercoat of fur
unknown distribution and density of fur but probably less than wooly mammoth because of its generally warmer habitat
Tusks
male tusks averaged of 8-9 ft length; long tusks that grew spirally from the base and curved around until the tips either pointed towards one another or crossed
male tusks averaged 14 ft; tusks were less twisted, asymmetrical, and spiral in opposite directions
Average Lifespan
60 years
80 years
Diet
plant food, primarily grass, sedges, shrubs, mosses, flowering plants
woody plants, grass and sedge; similar to wooly mammoth
Habitat
tundra steppe, from northern Asia, north east Europe into northern North America
southern half of North America, from the northern United States, through Mexico to Costa Rica

Columbian and wooly mammoths are distant relatives of today's elephants. The gender of the animal can be revealed by its pelvis, and the teeth generally reveal the animal's species, diet, and age (within two years).

All 61 animals found in the Mammoth Site were young males. Like elephants, mammoths were matriarchal societies and young males were cast outs from the family group who often engaged in greater risk taking behavior.

Three of the 61 are wooly mammoths, with the rest being Columbian mammoths. It isn't known whether the species co-existed or whether one species came along after the other species had vacated the area.

If you're in South Dakota, don't miss the opportunity to step back into time and take a glimpse at the final resting spot of these grand titans of the Ice Age. This world class paleontological dig site and museum is a rare treat which will intrigue, teach, and make you think.

The Mammoth Site is open year round with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, and Easter  Sunday.  Guided tours are 30 minutes long.
The Mammoth Site is open year round with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, and Easter Sunday. Guided tours are 30 minutes long. | Source

Reader Poll

Should scientists use DNA cloning to resurrect the wooly mammoth from extinction?

See results

Just A Short Drive From Other Great Places

show route and directions
A markerRapid City, SD -
Rapid City, SD, USA
get directions

About an hour and 15 minutes and a beautiful drive from Rapid City. Go ahead and make the trip!

B markerMount Rushmore National Memorial, SD -
Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Keystone, SD, USA
get directions

Almost an hour and 15 minutes from Mount Rushmore. Worth the trip.

C markerMammoth Site of Hot Springs, South Dakota, USA -
1800 US-18 BYP, Hot Springs, SD 57747, USA
get directions

D markerBlack Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, Hot Springs, SD, USA -
12165 Highland Rd, Hot Springs, SD 57747, USA
get directions

E markerWind Cave National Park, East Custer, SD, USA -
Wind Cave National Park, East Custer, SD 57730, USA
get directions

Admission Prices

Adult – $10.14 + tax

Senior – $8.29 + tax

Active Military & Veterans: $7.37 + tax

Children 4-12: $7.37 + tax

Children 3 and Under: Free

© 2015 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 5 months ago from USA

      Frances Metcalfe - It's a fascinating site if you ever get the chance to visit. Thank you for reading and commenting.

    • Frances Metcalfe profile image

      Frances Metcalfe 5 months ago from The Limousin, France

      very interesting article, complementing one I read the other day on dinosaurs. These fossils aren't from that long ago interms of geologica time - a real window into the not-so-distant past.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 10 months ago from USA

      Norma - Thank you for reading. It was an exciting, unexpected place that I would highly recommend!

    • norlawrence profile image

      Norma Lawrence 10 months ago from California

      Great article. Sounds like a fabulous place to visit. Thanks

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 11 months ago from USA

      Alun- You would be the perfect candidate for the volunteer excavation program in the summer to work alongside the experts. I saw many of them in action, and if you enjoy fossils this is your kind of place. The funny thing was that from the outside of the building, I didn't know what to expect. Inside, however, was amazing, a real gem.

    • Greensleeves Hubs profile image

      Greensleeves Hubs 11 months ago from Essex, UK

      This sounds like a place I would really love to visit Flourish. As you know I have an interest in prehistoric animals, and any museum would be of interest to me. But there seem to be so many different elements to this museum, and to incorporate a genuine fossil excavation site must be fairly unique.

      I'm particularly interested to hear that both woolly mammoths and Columbian mammoths lived here at the same time, geologically speaking. Given that they seem to have had similar diets (unlike mastodons) I wonder how they would have interacted? Or if, as you suggest, they kept their distance from each other, and occupied the site at different times, or possibly in different seasons?

      As for your poll I voted 'yes' to the resurrection of the mammoth. The reason is two-fold. Firstly, given that mankind may have played a role in its demise, it may not have been, in a sense, a natural extinction. Secondly, of course one always has concerns about the introduction of a new species into an environment, but this isn't an insect or a small mammal like a rat which may get out of control and be unmanageable. An animal as large as a mammoth could easily be constrained in reserves, just as elephants are in Africa today. Anyway, my judgement is coloured - I would just LOVE to see a real life woolly mammoth! :)

      A well laid out, attractive and informative hub. Alun

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 15 months ago from USA

      JanTUB - Thank you for reading! It was a great place to visit. Hope you can see it one day, too.

    • JanTUB profile image

      Jan T Urquhart Baillie 15 months ago from Australia

      So that's how they got there! Fascinating place to visit. Thanks for showing us.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 15 months ago from USA

      breathing - It was indeed awe-inspiring to be in the company of such bones. I hope one day you might be able to visit and see for yourself!

    • breathing profile image

      Sajib 15 months ago from Bangladesh

      So many mammoth bones in just one single place!!! That’s really something exciting and terrible! I really wish I could go there! These kinds of places will take you to the ancient times and you will have a frightening feeling at times thinking so many mammoths are surrounding you!! Also you can learn many differently kinds of information visit such places which is in itself a great asset. Those who do experiment with fossils must visit this place so that they can gather a great deal of information. Overall I can say that if anyone visits South Dakota, don’t miss this place!!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 16 months ago from SW England

      Thanks, you too!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 16 months ago from USA

      Ann - Thank you so much for the information and kind words. Have a wonderful weekend! Happy Valentine's Day!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 16 months ago from SW England

      Fascinating! I love hubs like this because it's so amazing how they find and preserve all these bones and piece together a picture of the creatures.

      The other day I watched a David Attenborough documentary about the Titanosaurus which was found recently - so huge it dwarfs all the rest!

      I presume that's you with the mammoth in the background? Great photo and super illustrations!

      Ann

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 17 months ago from USA

      Carolyn - Glad you enjoyed this. It was a really neat place, although I sure wouldn't want to be there right now (January). Brrrrr. Stay warm wherever you are! Thanks for reading and commenting!

    • CarolynEmerick profile image

      Carolyn Emerick 17 months ago

      What a fantastic place to visit! I really miss the upvote button, because I read a hub like this and just want to thumbs up it! Thanks for sharing your fun and educational trip with us!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 17 months ago from USA

      Rajan - Glad you enjoyed this. It is surely a fantastic visit, and I hope one day you can visit, my friend.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 17 months ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Very interesting read about something I was not aware of. I'm in awe at the masterly excavation & preservation. Surely a place I'd to see if possible.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 17 months ago from USA

      Amanda - Hope you get the chance to visit one day and perhaps even participate in the dig. It's a pretty cool place and so is South Dakota!

    • stuff4kids profile image

      Amanda Littlejohn 17 months ago

      Wow! What a fantastic hub. I always loved woolly mammoths (or the idea of them at any rate) when I was a kid. I totally would have loved this park. Thanks for sharing. :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 18 months ago from USA

      aesta1 - South Dakota was very different from my neck of the woods and had a number of interesting sites. I hope you are able to visit. Thanks for reading. Happy 2016.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 18 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      Another place to add to our travel list. I am not too familiar with mammoth so this is new learning for me. Besides, I haven't been to Dakota yet.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 18 months ago from USA

      Heidi - Glad you enjoyed this. I love the idea of participating in one of these digs, too. It's cool that regular people can sign up and participate. Merry Christmas! Thanks for stopping by!

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 18 months ago from Chicago Area

      Hi there! Catching up with my HP buds today and realized I had missed this post from you.

      Interesting to see that mammoths were a "feminist" culture. :) Love the pictures. And I would so love to participate in one of those digs someday (or an archaeological dig).

      Hope all is good with you and that you're enjoying the holiday season so far!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 18 months ago from USA

      Sheila - Thank you. I enjoyed the stop. It was well worth the trip, especially to see the scientists in action.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 18 months ago from Southern Oklahoma

      This was very interesting! This is a place I would love to visit! Your pictures are just awesome! :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      Poetryman6969 - I agree with you. Whatever happened to them to make them extinct we shuld just learn from their remains .

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 19 months ago

      Wow, sounds like some huge animals!

      I am still hoping nobody actually does that Jurassic Park stuff.

      At least no one in the US. If that dictator in North Korea wants to make stuff that can wreak havoc upon his own nation we should probably just grab the popcorn.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      Audrey - yes, it's quite unusual. I just wonder after he does it what then? A whole herd of them? I hope he thinks the whole thing through.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      Jackie - if you have the time you can look into a week or mor stint volunteering carefully digging up bones there. Cool huh? Thanks for reading and have a good weekend.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 19 months ago from The Beautiful South

      I should have gotten into the study of these things; it interests me so much! This is a very informative and fun read!

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 19 months ago from California

      I was reading the other day that a Russian scientist is trying to resurrect the woolly mamoth ---this looks like great fun!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Nell - Happy you enjoyed it so much! You'll have to visit one day!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 20 months ago from England

      Wow! I would love to visit here, I have always been interesting in paleontology and especially seeing all those mammoth bones, how fascinating! great hub and really interesting!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      agusfanani - Thank you for reading. They were such awe-inspiring creatures. I'm glad you enjoyed this. Have a lovely week.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Randy - I'm glad you liked it. I don't understand either why the voting options were taken away. I liked them myself as a way to further endorse a hub. Have a wonderful week!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      moonlake - Thanks for reading and sharing. Hope you can one day go and enjoy it for yourself. There's also a wild horse sanctuary that's beautiful.

    • agusfanani profile image

      agusfanani 20 months ago from Indonesia

      I get interesting information about mammoth after reading your hub that I have never known before. It is like my favorite destination for me to visit too. We also have museum with mammoth skeleton but located far from my city.

    • Randy Godwin profile image

      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Very well researched and written. A fascinating subject as well. Too bad HP has done away with the voting options. :(

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 20 months ago from America

      Enjoyed your hub. I would someday like to go there. Very interesting. Shared.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Frank - It was pretty special to be among such huge creatures, even if it was their bones from so many years back. Makes you feel small in significance.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 20 months ago from Shelton

      Flourish this is a great hub covering an amazing place.. it's a shame animals like this are just fossils.. yeah I would love to see scientists work their magic on DNA ... what a wonderful place to visit :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Carolyn - I appreciate the compliment and the share. Have a great week!

    • CarolynEmerick profile image

      Carolyn Emerick 20 months ago

      Thank you so much for this in depth info! Sharing in a biology group on FB :-)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Sha - Those are my sentiments exactly. Just because we can do something doesn't mean we should. I do hope you're able to visit one day. It's quite a different world up there.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 20 months ago from Central Florida

      Flourish, this is awesome. I had no idea so much of our ancient history lies in South Dakota. What an amazing experience it would be to visit this dig site. It's quite sad that sink holes contributed to the mammoths' demise.

      I don't think we should revive the species. I don't think Man should mess with Mother Nature and the natural process. Besides, today's climate and building of human habitats over what was once free-ranging land is probably not at all conducive to their survival. Shoot, today's species are losing a foothold on life for those very reasons!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Linda - South Dakota has some neat spots like this one. I am so glad that I went to the Mammoth Site and wished that I could have spent more time in the area exploring. I hope you're able to visit the state one day.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 20 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for such an informative and interesting hub, Flourish. The photos are great! I'd love to visit the Mammoth Site myself. I think that mammoths are fascinating animals.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Devika - Thank you for such a lovely comment. Have a wonderful week.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 20 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Sounds an awesome site! So nicely explored and written of from your intelligent mind.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Larry - Glad you were able to visit this paleo dig spot and liked it. Thanks for reading!

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 20 months ago from Oklahoma

      Iactually Had went to this archeological site several years ago. It was an awesome experience.

      Great read, as always.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Genna - I cannot imagine being trapped in that sink hole and wonder how long it took for an animal that large to starve to death. Terrible. Thank you for reading and commenting. Have a wonderful week ahead.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 20 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      It's hard to imagine that these magnificent creatures (and others) once roamed North America. Those sink holes of death must have been terrifying for them. Fascinating article...thank you.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Patricia - Although the fossils were discovered in 1974, the museum itself that is open to the public is a rather new addition. It is worth the trip. Angels back at you!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 20 months ago from sunny Florida

      O love South Dakota...lived in Rapid and on Ellsworth AFB in the late 70's and 80's...did not visit this site but when I get back I will. We spent most of our time in the Black Hills, Rushmore, Lead and Deadwood and out in the wild motorcycling...

      This brought it all back..thanks so much for the walk down memory lane...

      Angels are on the way to you this morning ps

      shared g+ pinned tweeted

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      stricklydating = Thanks for reading. Glad you enjoyed it!

    • stricktlydating profile image

      StricktlyDating 20 months ago from Australia

      Wow! Sure sounds amazing!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Blossom - Thanks for reading and for your kind comment. It was such a different kind of place and very unexpected. I enjoyed it very much. Have a lovely week ahead!

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 20 months ago from Victoria, Australia

      Such an interesting hub. It would be great to actually be there and see the site.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Deeda - THANKS!

    • profile image

      DEEDA 20 months ago

      Great hub Flourish!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      MsDora - Thanks for taking a look at this travel hub. It was an awesome trip that I would highly recommend to anyone going to the area.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      CarbDiva - I was by myself and had a few hours to kill while my daughter was in a STEM camp in Rapid a City at the SD School ofines and Technology. I didn't know much about it and I'm so glad I made the trip. Very educational and unlike anywhere I've ever been.

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 20 months ago from The Caribbean

      What a rich site this is with historical scientific finds! Thanks for the information and the pictures. Super interesting!

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 20 months ago from Washington State, USA

      What a great hub! I had absolutely no idea that the Hot Springs in SD was such a large site and that there is so much to it. I will definitely have to put this on my bucket list.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Reynold - What a neat background you have! A fascinating guy!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Bill - Luckily, it was very temperate during my stay (high 80s and 90s). It's a drier heat than what I'm used to in the South so I was good with that). Then I returned home to the sauna.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      John - It was definitely time well spent. I hope that one day you can venture to the States and see a few sites. Seeing it all up close was really quite something, and the scientists in the labs downstairs who were working (behind glass) on their microscopes even encouraged you to ask questions through microphones as they did their work. They were very open and eager to educate.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      Bill - The museum is fairly new and if you're ever in SD you'll have to stop by this place. It was a nice diversion. Thanks for reading! Have a great weekend!

    • Reynold Jay profile image

      Reynold Jay 20 months ago from Saginaw, Michigan

      Hi Flourish!!!!!!Looks like a fun place for me. I did teach dinosaurs and such and loved it. I do know that the Dakotas are one of the great palo sites in the world. Great Hub with lots of great facts. Humans have been toying with the environment such that all our foods is pretty much genetically altered to our liking. I votes YES as it is certain that it will be so.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 20 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Been there and done that. I think it was about 102 the day we were there...but it is fascinating.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 20 months ago from Queensland Australia

      Great hub Flourish. When I was young I wanted to be a paleontologist when I grew up. I would love to visit the Mammoth site in Hot Springs. I also saw a documentary about it on TV recently. The photos were wonderful. Well done.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 20 months ago from Massachusetts

      Great hub Flourish. Very interesting. I was in SD only once back in 1987 and don't recall if the Hot Springs was opened yet. If it was then I missed an opportunity. Will have to definitely put this on the list if I ever return to the area. Great job and love the photos.

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