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Cultybraggan Prisoner of War Camp

Updated on February 26, 2013

Cultybraggan Prisoner of War Camp

Some images from my recent visit to this interesting WW2 site, a former camp for German prisoners of war. Cultybraggan has variously been said to have opened in 1939 as no21 army training camp, in 1941 as a labour camp for Italian PoWs, or to have been built in 1941 as accommodation for German prisoners of war in category "A", or "black", deemed by the British authorities to be especially dangerous. Whichever is the truth, it ended up being arranged to accommodate up to 4,000 prisoners in five blocks, one each for the army (Werhrmacht - including the Afrika Corps), navy (Kriegsmarine), air force (Luftwaffe) and SS, and a separate block for officers. The camp is said to have accommodated Deputy Fuhrer Rudolf Hess overnight after his plane crash but other reports hold that he was held in Buchanan Castle. It gained some notoriety as the site of the lynching - by his fellow prisoners - of Wolfgang Rosterg in 1944. Five of the inmates were subsequently executed for his murder at Pentonville prison. The camp is said to have been disbanded in 1945 - with the inmates apparently transferring to other camps including Watten - although there is also evidence to suggest that it continued in use until 1947. Two blocks in the western range were demolished in the 1970s to make way for an assault course and firing range.

The camp made the news in 2009 after one of the former inmates, a former SS member captured by the British at Caen in Normandy, bequeathed c.£110,000 in his will to be spent on care for the elderly in the neighbouring village of Comrie, in consideration of his humane treatment by his captors and the local inhabitants whilst a prisoner of war and later a resident.

After the Second World War (circa 1949) the camp became a training camp for the Territorial Army, in which guise it continued until the army vacated it in 2004, leaving behind the indications of its presence which I have sought to record in these few photographs.

It is said that the site as now is very similar to the appearance it bore whilst in use as a PoW camp, including reuse of the original 16' and 24' span Nissen Huts. The shots I took largely relate to the buildings in the guards' section of the compound, which lies by the main gate, with the exception of one shot from the window of the medical block which features buildings in what was the German compound. Part of the site has now been scheduled by Historic Scotland for its historical interest.

Camp office, Cultybraggan
Camp office, Cultybraggan

By the main gate in Cultybraggan

 

Medical block at Cultybraggan

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This photograph looks out of the medical block window towards part of the German compound.  Note the huts arranged in threes, the original configuration of the inmates' huts.
This photograph looks out of the medical block window towards part of the German compound.  Note the huts arranged in threes, the original configuration of the inmates' huts.
This photograph looks out of the medical block window towards part of the German compound. Note the huts arranged in threes, the original configuration of the inmates' huts.
Former detention block, PoW camp 21 Cultybraggan, Comrie, Petheshire, Scotland
Former detention block, PoW camp 21 Cultybraggan, Comrie, Petheshire, Scotland

Camp stores, formerly the detention block.

This camp stores building served as the detention block of the original camp.

The palatial officers' mess

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Note what is, apparently, the original stove.
Note what is, apparently, the original stove.
Note what is, apparently, the original stove.

Videos of Cultybraggan

Excellent, atmospheric shots and classic period music!

Reader Feedback is much appreciated

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    • tfsherman lm profile image

      tfsherman lm 4 years ago

      We've heard so much about German concentration camps. Interesting to hear about the Brit side. More interesting to here that they were so humane that former prisoners left them money!

    • ManipledMutineer profile image
      Author

      ManipledMutineer 4 years ago

      @tfsherman lm: Many thanks for your comment; it is indeed a little known but interesting subject!

    • CoeGurl profile image

      CoeGurl 4 years ago from USA

      LOVE that the British treated their POWs humanely.

    • BritFlorida profile image

      Jackie Jackson 4 years ago from Fort Lauderdale

      What a very spooky place. Great photographs.

    • ManipledMutineer profile image
      Author

      ManipledMutineer 4 years ago

      @BritFlorida: Many thanks for your comments. It's not so bad on a sunny day in company!

    • kabbalah lm profile image

      kabbalah lm 4 years ago

      At least we treated them humanely. Their prison camps were much worse, unlike the TV show Hogans Heroes

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 4 years ago

      Foreign POW's were ALWAYS better treated in WWII when in Allied camps

    • IanTease profile image

      IanTease 3 years ago

      Interesting lens, didn't know anything about this

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