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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (14 posts)

What kind of road or which road do you consider the most dangerous?

  1. Astralrose profile image94
    Astralroseposted 5 years ago

    What kind of road or which road do you consider the most dangerous?

    I found the picture below (@smilewanderer.wordpress.com) weeks back and is considered as one of the most dangerous roads. For me, the roads towards the higher Himalayas like the roads from Rishikesh to Badrinath, India are very scary and dangerous because the roads are winding, not properly done (not concreted or tarred...long stretch) then if one is not driving cautiously one could end up falling off the cliffs or bump into rocky sides of the mountains or be under mud or rocks once hit by landslides or rock falls (cloudburst). So I think these kind of roads are the most dangerous for me.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7305160_f260.jpg

  2. DreamerMeg profile image90
    DreamerMegposted 5 years ago

    Yes, these kinds of roads are VERY dangerous. Tight curves, poor maintenance, no guard rails, no hard shoulder, big drops, no road lighting. I could go on and on!

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly, DreamerMeg! In fact, around here in the hills there are timings at night for vehicles to be admitted to drive onward. After that particular time no one is allowed until next day morning.

  3. Goody5 profile image65
    Goody5posted 5 years ago

    The most dangerous type of road on this planet is one which has separate patches of black ice on it. That's a form of ice that you can't see until you hit it, and it's deadly. If you have never experienced black ice before, then I hope you never do. Keep on hubbing  smile

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Haven't seen nor heard of it, too. But what you're saying is equally dangerous!  Frozen alive? Whew!

  4. Agnes Penn profile image81
    Agnes Pennposted 5 years ago

    I've driven/been driven through many roads, but none like the ones you've described.  So, I'll take a philosophical approach to your question and answer: the most dangerous road is the one traveled alone. At times it may be the best, but it is always dangerous.

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Indeed! And even more dangerous if we don't know anything about the place where we are going. It's always advisable to get acquainted (through reading about them) with the places we want to go before venturing into them!

  5. edhan profile image60
    edhanposted 5 years ago

    Personally, I believe that you must have a clear vision of the road path you are driving in order to be safe. I do not like the idea of driving in situation where I do not know where I am going or how to reach my destination.

    It is my policy of knowing how am I to get from point A to point B before setting off my journey.

    Looking at the picture, it does show kind of dangerous driving in that sort of road but if you have the idea of how it is going to be, at least it will be safer that way.

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You have a point! Knowing how to reach a place is a plus point. But for first timers (always there's a first time to be on a particular road) it's always better to be on the wheels, drive with caution and had the car checked.

    2. edhan profile image60
      edhanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. For my car, I always do not compromise checks on wheels and braking system.

  6. Blond Logic profile image98
    Blond Logicposted 5 years ago

    That road does look dangerous.
    I think my idea of a perilous road has changed over time. When I was in California I always thought the freeways in LA were dangerous due to the sheer volume of traffic.

    Now in rural Brazil, my eyes have been opened. The roads(the ones that are tarmac)  are peppered with pot holes big enough to swallow half a car. They are poorly repaired and when the rains come, these repairs are washed away. Add to that wild donkeys, untethered cows, drunk pedestrians and a large percentage of the population driving without a license and it is a big problem.

    The upside to this though, often these roads are in beautiful natural areas and if western style roads were introduced, the countryside would be ruined due to increased traffic.

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Right! Others on the road could contribute to danger because we don't have control over their action-how slow or fast they go. Also, the manner of repairs (if roads get repaired).

  7. unvrso profile image91
    unvrsoposted 5 years ago

    The most dangerous roads in the country where I live are those crossing the Sierras Madres. In Mexico there are two Sierras Madres: The Sierra Madre Oriental and the Sierra Madre Occidental.

    I traveled through the Sierra Madre Occidental once and I couldnĀ“t beleive how long can it take to travel from a Durango to Mazatlan on a bus.

    I took the bus at Durango at 6tongue.M. and traveled the rest of the day and all night to get to Mazatlan the following day at about 12: P.M.

    If I had traveled on a plain road, it would have taken not one day and a half, but a few hours to get there.

    The road starts to get very zigzagging when you start at the slopes of the Sierra Madre and it continues until you get to the other side of the Sierra the following day.

    1. Astralrose profile image94
      Astralroseposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I can imagine what you are saying. Travelling at night, too, makes it more dangerous. One less quick maneuver and well, bus might just fall somewhere down another hill or perhaps river.

 
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