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Enjoying Kyoto in the Heat of Summer

Updated on April 11, 2014

Why Kyoto in Summer?

If you'd asked me what my favorite season of the year was years ago, summer would've been my very last choice. Summers in Tokyo are incredibly hot and humid and the heat is so amazingly intense, it has the ability to zap all the energy out of the most energetic human being.

After having lived here in Tokyo for two decades, I've gotten used to the heat and have learned to somewhat cope like the rest of the Tokyoites. There are many ways to cool down during the hot summers so it's not all that unpleasant if you make the effort to stay cool. Eating foods that have a cooling effect on the body ( i.e. cucumber ) helps cool your body down, while drinking lots of water throughout the day will keep your energy levels high.

Every summer I treat myself to a trip. Anywhere is fine really, as long as it's someplace relaxing and rejuvenating, hopefully a place that's not as hot as Tokyo. The only other city in Japan that I know of that's even hotter than Tokyo in the summer, is Kyoto. You'd have to be pretty crazy to visit the ancient capital during this most intense and uncomfortable season.

So why in the world did I decide to visit Kyoto during the hottest months of the year? Keep reading to find out why. And along the way, I'll show you how to stay cool and comfortable in one of the most beautiful cities in all of Japan.

*All photos taken by myself unless otherwise noted.

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Shinichi and Michael
Shinichi and Michael

Wearing a Yukata Keeps Your Cool

Kyoto is 320 miles, or just a 2 hour 18 minute bullet train ride away from Tokyo. Arriving at Kyoto Station, we immediately head to our hotel to get changed into our yukatas. The Yukata is a traditional Japanese garment worn by both men and women during the summer months. Although they are usually worn to fireworks or summer festivals, you can wear them to just about anywhere.

When I first wore the yukata, it was hard to comprehend why it was meant as summer garb. I mean there is a lot of fabric for something that's supposed to keep you cool. However once I'd spend a day in one, I found that the yukata is actually comfortable and surprisingly kept me cool in a different sort of way than normal clothing. Of course nothing beats a simple t-shirt and a pair of shorts but certain occasions call for a less casual ensemble. Believe me, a yukata is so much more comfortable and cool than a summer suit.

After being in one for an entire day in the hot sun in a yukata, this is how I see it. The only part of the entire outfit that's constricting in any way, is the belt portion. With wide openings in the arms, the yukata is basically a light-fabric one-piece ensemble. Its loose and flowy fabric lets air rush through the areas between fabric and skin, and as a result, keeps the body quite cool. A Japanese fan stashed away in the yukata sleeves makes the perfect accessory that's not only cool looking, but also practical.

Once we got into our yukatas, we were ready to hit the streets.

*Photo : Me and my friend Michael in our yukatas.

Traditional and Authentic Yukatas

When buying yukatas, make sure to buy authentic ones. Yukata "robes" made of satin or silk is only worn outside of Japan by tourists. Fans can be stashed away in the wide sleeve of the yukata.

A Stroll through Kyoto

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Yasaka Shrine is a Shinto Shrine near the Gion District of Kyoto. Initial construction began in 656 and is one of the most popular shrines in Kyoto.The shrine includes several buildings and a main hall.It also includes a stage for special performances.My favorite tea shop in all of Japan, Ippodo, famous for the highest-quality green tea serving customers for nearly 3 centuries.One of the oldest shops in Japan to make and sell Western-style cookies.The exterior of the cookie shop. When I went inside, they were all sold out except for a few selections.One needs to keep energy levels up during strolls through foreign cities. This retro cafe is famous for their french toast.The cafe called Smart Cafe also serves hotcakes. This certain cafe has been serving customers since 1932.Many retro buildings line the streets of Kyoto.Known as Kyoto's Kitchen, Nishiki is a foodie's paradise.Nishiki is five blocks of over 100 shops and restaurants with many that specializes in a single food item.Kyoto is famous for pickled vegetables. Here is one of the oldest shops located in Nishiki.Nishiki has a lively atmosphere and it's fun to stroll this street especially for a foodie like me.Pork filled buns make a great snack while strolling.The streets of Kyoto has so much charm and atmosphere.Kyoto has other streets to explore like this one, with its very own shrine tucked away between two retail stores.We also visited Nijo Castle near the city center.The ground were spacious and had a lot to see. However fatigue set in by this time. It was time to get some dinner.Let's head over to the riverside before sunset.
Yasaka Shrine is a Shinto Shrine near the Gion District of Kyoto. Initial construction began in 656 and is one of the most popular shrines in Kyoto.
Yasaka Shrine is a Shinto Shrine near the Gion District of Kyoto. Initial construction began in 656 and is one of the most popular shrines in Kyoto.
The shrine includes several buildings and a main hall.
The shrine includes several buildings and a main hall.
It also includes a stage for special performances.
It also includes a stage for special performances.
My favorite tea shop in all of Japan, Ippodo, famous for the highest-quality green tea serving customers for nearly 3 centuries.
My favorite tea shop in all of Japan, Ippodo, famous for the highest-quality green tea serving customers for nearly 3 centuries.
One of the oldest shops in Japan to make and sell Western-style cookies.
One of the oldest shops in Japan to make and sell Western-style cookies.
The exterior of the cookie shop. When I went inside, they were all sold out except for a few selections.
The exterior of the cookie shop. When I went inside, they were all sold out except for a few selections.
One needs to keep energy levels up during strolls through foreign cities. This retro cafe is famous for their french toast.
One needs to keep energy levels up during strolls through foreign cities. This retro cafe is famous for their french toast.
The cafe called Smart Cafe also serves hotcakes. This certain cafe has been serving customers since 1932.
The cafe called Smart Cafe also serves hotcakes. This certain cafe has been serving customers since 1932.
Many retro buildings line the streets of Kyoto.
Many retro buildings line the streets of Kyoto.
Known as Kyoto's Kitchen, Nishiki is a foodie's paradise.
Known as Kyoto's Kitchen, Nishiki is a foodie's paradise.
Nishiki is five blocks of over 100 shops and restaurants with many that specializes in a single food item.
Nishiki is five blocks of over 100 shops and restaurants with many that specializes in a single food item.
Kyoto is famous for pickled vegetables. Here is one of the oldest shops located in Nishiki.
Kyoto is famous for pickled vegetables. Here is one of the oldest shops located in Nishiki.
Nishiki has a lively atmosphere and it's fun to stroll this street especially for a foodie like me.
Nishiki has a lively atmosphere and it's fun to stroll this street especially for a foodie like me.
Pork filled buns make a great snack while strolling.
Pork filled buns make a great snack while strolling.
The streets of Kyoto has so much charm and atmosphere.
The streets of Kyoto has so much charm and atmosphere.
Kyoto has other streets to explore like this one, with its very own shrine tucked away between two retail stores.
Kyoto has other streets to explore like this one, with its very own shrine tucked away between two retail stores.
We also visited Nijo Castle near the city center.
We also visited Nijo Castle near the city center.
The ground were spacious and had a lot to see. However fatigue set in by this time. It was time to get some dinner.
The ground were spacious and had a lot to see. However fatigue set in by this time. It was time to get some dinner.
Let's head over to the riverside before sunset.
Let's head over to the riverside before sunset.

This Best Guidebook to Kyoto

Lonely Planet Kyoto (Travel Guide)
Lonely Planet Kyoto (Travel Guide)

I find the Lonely Planet guidebooks to be superior to others. This particular one includes all the essential information you need for a visit to Kyoto. Color maps and images throughout show you how to get the most out of your trip. Information include reviews on eating, sleeping, sight seeing, shopping, and even night life as well as hidden gems that many people miss out on.

 
Kamo River Kyoto
Kamo River Kyoto

Along the Kamo River

As afternoon aproaches, we head down to the Kamo River, a popular strolling spot for residents and tourists. In the summer, restaurants along the riverbank open up their balconies for patrons to dine al fresco. In the past, Kamo River was a source of pure drinking water for the locals. The river was also used for Kyo-yuzen dyeing, a craft that was made famous in Kyoto.

Strolling along the river bank is a nice way to cool off during the summer. The breeze feels just a bit cooler here and the pace is much slower. Festive ornaments line both sides of the river announcing to the world that summer is here. Summer is a time of celebration and a variety of festivals are scheduled throughout the entire city.

We sit for a good 10 minutes just gazing at the river, letting the gentle flow of the waters heal our souls. The Japanese have always taken to riverbanks to cool off during the hot months and not surprisingly, the riverbank is most active during this time of the year.

Strolling Along the Kamo River

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The pace of life is slow along the river bank.Various objects of art can be found all along the river, as the city prepares for night festivities.We stop by a restaurant serving a Kyoto specialty, Nishin-Soba ( smoked herring buckwheat noodles ), which also overlooks the river.The gentle waters of the Kamo River helps cool you off.Dining outside on the balconies which line the Kamo River is a summer-only luxury that can only be experienced during the summer.Sit along the river and rest your weary feet.Sit and gaze at the gentle waters of Kamo River.Kimono fabric decorate certain parts of the river helping to create a festive mood.Sunset over the Kamo River.
The pace of life is slow along the river bank.
The pace of life is slow along the river bank.
Various objects of art can be found all along the river, as the city prepares for night festivities.
Various objects of art can be found all along the river, as the city prepares for night festivities.
We stop by a restaurant serving a Kyoto specialty, Nishin-Soba ( smoked herring buckwheat noodles ), which also overlooks the river.
We stop by a restaurant serving a Kyoto specialty, Nishin-Soba ( smoked herring buckwheat noodles ), which also overlooks the river.
The gentle waters of the Kamo River helps cool you off.
The gentle waters of the Kamo River helps cool you off.
Dining outside on the balconies which line the Kamo River is a summer-only luxury that can only be experienced during the summer.
Dining outside on the balconies which line the Kamo River is a summer-only luxury that can only be experienced during the summer.
Sit along the river and rest your weary feet.
Sit along the river and rest your weary feet.
Sit and gaze at the gentle waters of Kamo River.
Sit and gaze at the gentle waters of Kamo River.
Kimono fabric decorate certain parts of the river helping to create a festive mood.
Kimono fabric decorate certain parts of the river helping to create a festive mood.
Sunset over the Kamo River.
Sunset over the Kamo River.
nanzan hitoshina
nanzan hitoshina

Dining at Nanzan Hitoshina

Tonight we're in for a treat. We've made reservations at one of the most sought after seats in Kyoto - Nanzan Hitoshina, a restaurant that serves up modern versions of the very traditional and elaborate Kaiseki cuisine of Kyoto.

My friend and I have been wanting to come here for the longest time and numerous friends have raved about how good this place is. You could even say that I made my trip down to Kyoto just so that I could experience dining at this modern Kaiseki restaurant. They have three restaurants around the world - Hawaii and Paris with Kyoto being the main branch of the Nanzan enterprise. Earlier this year I heard that they have opened a branch in Tokyo, which I plan on visiting in the near future.

Kaiseki is a traditional multi-course dinner usually consisting of various dishes that reflect the seasons and the chef's culinary skills. True kaiseki must carefully balance taste, texture, appearance and colors using only the freshest seasonal ingredients and prepared in ways that aim to enhance rather than mask natural flavors. Kaiseki is truly an art form.

It took us a good 20 minutes to finally find the restaurant which was tucked away into a side street in a back alleyway at the end of a small stream so without my GPS to guide me, I probably would have never found it. Fortunately we got there in one piece and as we were dressed in our yukatas, we weren't sweating all that much.

Nanzan Hitoshina does kaiseki with a modern twist, so we went without expectations. Needless to say, I was quite blown away as each dish took me by surprise with new flavor combinations and textures. It was the first time in a long time that I was challenged by the new taste sensations, some to the point where I wasn't sure what to make of it at first. Each dish was like a symphony that harmonized perfectly only by following precise instructions. Perhaps one ingredient tasted bland on its own, however eaten with the other three ingredients on the plate, created the perfect balance of flavors.

Good Kaiseki cuisine always has the ability to take me on a culinary journey and leaves me feeling excited, thrilled and beyond satisfaction. Kaiseki is truly a feast for the senses.

Finding the Restaurant is Part of the Fun

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Walking around the Gion district.Traditional tea houses line the stream.The traditional architecture in this area is one of my favorite places in the city.Trying to look for the restaurant wasn't easy. We got lost in all the nooks and crannys of this maze-like city.Chefs take center stage in this cubby-hole sized restaurant. Seats are situated around the counter, where all the action can be seen.The first course was seasonal fish prepared three ways. A great start to the kaiseki meal.Soup course consisted of too many ingredients I can't remember. The soup was outstanding and tasted more like a complicated main course.Sashimi was also seasonal eaten with the condiments on the side. No soy sauce is provided, but not needed with so much flavor.All I know is that this dish blew my mind. Unfortunately, I can't remember what it was.Our main course of duck with another intricate side dish inside the porcelain duck.Rice with grilled seasonal fish, nori, rice crackers and mitsuba sprouts served with fish broth. Pickled vegetables come with this final dish.Meal ends with three kinds of desserts. Kyoto carrot jelly, seasonal sherbet and Kyoto tofu mousse flavored with almonds. Fantastic!Satisfied after the meal, we strolled back to our hotel.Riverbank restaurant with guests enjoying the balmy summer air.Last shot in my yukata before resting for the night.
Walking around the Gion district.
Walking around the Gion district.
Traditional tea houses line the stream.
Traditional tea houses line the stream.
The traditional architecture in this area is one of my favorite places in the city.
The traditional architecture in this area is one of my favorite places in the city.
Trying to look for the restaurant wasn't easy. We got lost in all the nooks and crannys of this maze-like city.
Trying to look for the restaurant wasn't easy. We got lost in all the nooks and crannys of this maze-like city.
Chefs take center stage in this cubby-hole sized restaurant. Seats are situated around the counter, where all the action can be seen.
Chefs take center stage in this cubby-hole sized restaurant. Seats are situated around the counter, where all the action can be seen.
The first course was seasonal fish prepared three ways. A great start to the kaiseki meal.
The first course was seasonal fish prepared three ways. A great start to the kaiseki meal.
Soup course consisted of too many ingredients I can't remember. The soup was outstanding and tasted more like a complicated main course.
Soup course consisted of too many ingredients I can't remember. The soup was outstanding and tasted more like a complicated main course.
Sashimi was also seasonal eaten with the condiments on the side. No soy sauce is provided, but not needed with so much flavor.
Sashimi was also seasonal eaten with the condiments on the side. No soy sauce is provided, but not needed with so much flavor.
All I know is that this dish blew my mind. Unfortunately, I can't remember what it was.
All I know is that this dish blew my mind. Unfortunately, I can't remember what it was.
Our main course of duck with another intricate side dish inside the porcelain duck.
Our main course of duck with another intricate side dish inside the porcelain duck.
Rice with grilled seasonal fish, nori, rice crackers and mitsuba sprouts served with fish broth. Pickled vegetables come with this final dish.
Rice with grilled seasonal fish, nori, rice crackers and mitsuba sprouts served with fish broth. Pickled vegetables come with this final dish.
Meal ends with three kinds of desserts. Kyoto carrot jelly, seasonal sherbet and Kyoto tofu mousse flavored with almonds. Fantastic!
Meal ends with three kinds of desserts. Kyoto carrot jelly, seasonal sherbet and Kyoto tofu mousse flavored with almonds. Fantastic!
Satisfied after the meal, we strolled back to our hotel.
Satisfied after the meal, we strolled back to our hotel.
Riverbank restaurant with guests enjoying the balmy summer air.
Riverbank restaurant with guests enjoying the balmy summer air.
Last shot in my yukata before resting for the night.
Last shot in my yukata before resting for the night.

Kaiseki - The Highest Form of Japanese Cuisine

Kaiseki: The Exquisite Cuisine of Kyoto's Kikunoi Restaurant
Kaiseki: The Exquisite Cuisine of Kyoto's Kikunoi Restaurant

This illustrated book is a feast for the eyes as well as the palate. Chef Murata's Kaiseki book is a cookbook that's truly a work of art. Learn how the seasonal style of cooking began as a tea ceremony accompaniment developed into the highest form of Japanese cuisine. A great gift for those who have a love for Japanese food and Kaiseki Cuisine.

 
Fushimi Inari Shrine
Fushimi Inari Shrine

Fushimi Inari Shrine

This morning we have a mission and it's one I had been looking forward to. Those who've been there talk about how beautiful this place is and rave about it's magnificence. On previous visits to Kyoto, I never managed to fit this shrine into my schedule as there were always other sites to visit.

At first glance, the shrine looked like any other sharing I've been to and immediately decided that it was going to underwhelm me. How wrong I was to judge a shrine by it's entrance.

The Fushimi Inari is the main shrine of all Inari shrines in Japan. The Inari God depicted as a fox, symbolizes rice and good harvest but the shrine is especially favored by merchants and businessmen, who visit here to pray for good business.

After visiting the main shrine complex, hundreds of vermillion-colored torii gates lead to other smaller shrines. It's a long 4 kilometer trek up the mountain taking approximately two hours to make it to the top. I really wanted to go all the way but the intense heat and humidity made it impossible to continue for more than an hour. Halfway to the top, we decided to turn back and save the complete climb for another visit.

Kyoto's Most Spectacular Shrine

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Enter through the torii gates.The shrine is easy to spot from the train station.The Inari God stands guard.The stage where traditional performances can be seen.The Inari Fox with a piece of deep-fried tofu ( inari ) in his mouth.The torii gate leading up to the mountain.Here's the entrance to the mountain shrines.The beginning of the 4- kilometer route up the mountain.We stumble upon some miniature shrines during the climb.It keeps going up forever.Having a much-needed matcha ( green tea ) break at one of the rest stops on the trek.The road splits in two but leads to the same place.Another much-needed break of some shaved ice with matcha syrup. Ahhh, now that hits the spot.The tunnel of torii gates.Each gate is sponsored by a local business.Keep going because it's still a long way up.More miniature shrines along the way.
Enter through the torii gates.
Enter through the torii gates.
The shrine is easy to spot from the train station.
The shrine is easy to spot from the train station.
The Inari God stands guard.
The Inari God stands guard.
The stage where traditional performances can be seen.
The stage where traditional performances can be seen.
The Inari Fox with a piece of deep-fried tofu ( inari ) in his mouth.
The Inari Fox with a piece of deep-fried tofu ( inari ) in his mouth.
The torii gate leading up to the mountain.
The torii gate leading up to the mountain.
Here's the entrance to the mountain shrines.
Here's the entrance to the mountain shrines.
The beginning of the 4- kilometer route up the mountain.
The beginning of the 4- kilometer route up the mountain.
We stumble upon some miniature shrines during the climb.
We stumble upon some miniature shrines during the climb.
It keeps going up forever.
It keeps going up forever.
Having a much-needed matcha ( green tea ) break at one of the rest stops on the trek.
Having a much-needed matcha ( green tea ) break at one of the rest stops on the trek.
The road splits in two but leads to the same place.
The road splits in two but leads to the same place.
Another much-needed break of some shaved ice with matcha syrup. Ahhh, now that hits the spot.
Another much-needed break of some shaved ice with matcha syrup. Ahhh, now that hits the spot.
The tunnel of torii gates.
The tunnel of torii gates.
Each gate is sponsored by a local business.
Each gate is sponsored by a local business.
Keep going because it's still a long way up.
Keep going because it's still a long way up.
More miniature shrines along the way.
More miniature shrines along the way.

Food Culture in Kyoto

sushi
sushi

A visit to Kyoto is never complete without experiencing its culinary delights. The city is known for some of the highest-quality produce allowing them to create the best pickles in the nation. The best green teas are grown in this region and many pastry shops make good use of them. Even the simplest bowl of noodles is a treat.

We've managed to eat a lot of food on this trip. From the haute cuisine of Kaiseki to the simple bowl of Kyoto style noodles, we ate, we conquered and we devoured to our heart's content. Still there never is enough time for all the foodstuff I want to sample in Kyoto so I promise myself to come back for a foodie's tour of this wonderful city.

Kyoto's Culinary Tour

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Inoda Coffee has been serving customers since 1940 and is famous for their special blends.We were at Inoda Coffee for an early brunch. I had the salad with a croissant. I needed to save room for more meals throughout the day.My friend ordered the grilled pork dish, which was actually pretty good. We both finished off with their delicious coffee blend.A tiny snack of Kyoto's famous Saba-Sushi. ( Mackerel sushi )Kyoto-style Omu-Rice ( Omelette Rice ) Restaurant near the river in the Ponto-cho district.Kyoto's version of Omu-Rice was very refined liked everything else in Kyoto. Instead of ketchup, a very light cream sauce was used.A piping hot bowl of Kyoto-style ramen with yuba ( tofu skin ).A lavish meal with various dishes called Obanzai  ( Kyoto-style family foods )My meal consists of various Kyoto specialties including pressed sushi. tempura and cold noodles with a carrot jelly for dessert.This place is famous for their egg omelettes over eel dishes.Under this thick blanket of egg omelette lies some broiled eggs over a mound of rice.Dessert at a cafe at 10 PM is always a good thing.
Inoda Coffee has been serving customers since 1940 and is famous for their special blends.
Inoda Coffee has been serving customers since 1940 and is famous for their special blends.
We were at Inoda Coffee for an early brunch. I had the salad with a croissant. I needed to save room for more meals throughout the day.
We were at Inoda Coffee for an early brunch. I had the salad with a croissant. I needed to save room for more meals throughout the day.
My friend ordered the grilled pork dish, which was actually pretty good. We both finished off with their delicious coffee blend.
My friend ordered the grilled pork dish, which was actually pretty good. We both finished off with their delicious coffee blend.
A tiny snack of Kyoto's famous Saba-Sushi. ( Mackerel sushi )
A tiny snack of Kyoto's famous Saba-Sushi. ( Mackerel sushi )
Kyoto-style Omu-Rice ( Omelette Rice ) Restaurant near the river in the Ponto-cho district.
Kyoto-style Omu-Rice ( Omelette Rice ) Restaurant near the river in the Ponto-cho district.
Kyoto's version of Omu-Rice was very refined liked everything else in Kyoto. Instead of ketchup, a very light cream sauce was used.
Kyoto's version of Omu-Rice was very refined liked everything else in Kyoto. Instead of ketchup, a very light cream sauce was used.
A piping hot bowl of Kyoto-style ramen with yuba ( tofu skin ).
A piping hot bowl of Kyoto-style ramen with yuba ( tofu skin ).
A lavish meal with various dishes called Obanzai  ( Kyoto-style family foods )
A lavish meal with various dishes called Obanzai ( Kyoto-style family foods )
My meal consists of various Kyoto specialties including pressed sushi. tempura and cold noodles with a carrot jelly for dessert.
My meal consists of various Kyoto specialties including pressed sushi. tempura and cold noodles with a carrot jelly for dessert.
This place is famous for their egg omelettes over eel dishes.
This place is famous for their egg omelettes over eel dishes.
Under this thick blanket of egg omelette lies some broiled eggs over a mound of rice.
Under this thick blanket of egg omelette lies some broiled eggs over a mound of rice.
Dessert at a cafe at 10 PM is always a good thing.
Dessert at a cafe at 10 PM is always a good thing.

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Kyoto's Seasonal Charms

Kyoto Lantern
Kyoto Lantern

There are many places of interest in Kyoto and too many to visit on a single visit. For most visitors, temples such as the grand Kiyomizu Temple and the Golden Pavilion, are absolute must-sees. Being that this wasn't my first trip to Kyoto, I opted to go for more local experiences this time around, rather than visit the tourist hotspots.

Yes, summertime may not be the most optimal time to visit Kyoto. Still if you know how to keep yourself cool, it's one of the most festive of seasons. With the various summer festivals taking place around the city and the opportunity to wear a traditional yukata while sampling various summer dishes, there's really no reason why you shouldn't go.

Make no mistake, Kyoto is hot during the summer months. Crazy hot! But if you wear appropriate clothing, pace yourself and make sure to eat cooling foods throughout the day, you're sure to have a great time...unless you're planning to make the 2-hour climb to the top of Fushimi Inari Shrine. For that, you really should go during the spring or fall seasons as it's much cooler.

I'm already planning my next trip to Kyoto to see the autumn foliage with my own eyes. I've seen the incredible cherry blossoms of Kyoto but yet to experience the intense beauty of Kyoto in the fall.

For more information on visiting Kyoto, visit the Official Kyoto Travel Guide.

I hope you enjoyed reading about my short trip to Kyoto. Have you ever been to this beautiful part of Japan? What did you most enjoy about it? If not, did reading this article make you want to visit? Please let me know you dropped by. Thanks so much.

Thanks for Reading!

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    • CYong74 profile image

      Cedric Yong 16 months ago from Singapore

      Walking around Kyoto in Yukata would indeed be the paramount Japanese experience. Good recommendation!

    • annieangel1 profile image

      Ann 2 years ago from Yorkshire, England

      this brings back so many lovely memories - thank you.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @AnonymousC831: Thanks so much!

    • smine27 profile image
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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @AnonymousC831: Thanks so much

    • smine27 profile image
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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @tazzytamar: Thank you for the kind words.

    • smine27 profile image
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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @tazzytamar: Thank you for the kind words.

    • AnonymousC831 profile image

      AnonymousC831 3 years ago from Kentucky

      I want to visit Kyoto. Beautiful photos, really great lens.

    • tazzytamar profile image

      Anna 3 years ago from chichester

      Beautiful photography! This is a really amazing lens :) it deserves a LOTD

    • smine27 profile image
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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @sybil watson: Aww thanks Sybil. Glad you enjoyed the journey.

    • smine27 profile image
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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Max Globe: Aww thanks Max. You just made my day.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Minoru10: It really was fun Minoru. Looking forward to taking a trip with you again someday.

    • Spirality profile image

      Spirality 3 years ago

      You have great photographs. The french toast looks delectable. I favorite pictures are the ones looking through the torii gates and the ones along the Kamo River. Awesome lens, as always;)

    • profile image

      sybil watson 3 years ago

      Your pictures are amazing! I love how you tell us all the details about what you ate so that we can live vicariously through you. I would dearly love to go to Japan, but I'll have to be content for now with wearing my own yukata which I bought at a hotel in Hawaii.

    • Max Globe profile image

      Max Globe 3 years ago

      The food looks so delicious, I almost want to cry) And the old streets are simply mesmerizing, Thanks for such a cool lens!

    • Minoru10 profile image

      Michael Yoshinaka 3 years ago from Honolulu, Hawaii

      It was so fun ! Thanks for taking me there with you. Oh yes and I wish we could have gone to the top of Fushimi Inari Shrine, but it was really hot. My first time that year that the heat in Japan really got to me. Oh and the shave ice was soooo Refreshing. : D

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Ruthi: Thank you Ruthi. It would be my pleasure!

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @TanoCalvenoa: Aww thanks so much. I do hope you get to visit one of these days. let me know if you do.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @jolou: Oh we have extreme summers here Joanne. Our summers are brutal!

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @esmonaco: Hey there, always enjoy your visits to my lenses.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @ecogranny: Grace, I am always grateful for your visits to my lenses. Thanks always for your encouraging words.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Diana Wenzel: I hope you get to visit one day and hopefully, I can show you around some.

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Jerzimom: Thanks so much Cheryl

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @David Stone1: Thanks so much Dave. Your visits mean a lot to me. Cheers!

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      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      @Merrci: So glad you like them Merrci. If this page is making you hungry, that's a good thing. hehe

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      Ruthi 3 years ago

      You and Michael look great and comfortable in your yukatas. I would love to have you as my tour guide one day, and my chef, too!

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      TanoCalvenoa 3 years ago

      I love all your Japan pages. Each one makes me very much wish I could go there. Maybe someday.

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      jolou 3 years ago

      Very interesting article, and I love your photos. I didn't realize it got so hot in Japan. I thought you had a more temperate climate.

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      Eugene Samuel Monaco 3 years ago from Lakewood New York

      Thanks for another amazing tour with your fantastic pictures, as always your descriptions are outstanding and makes me feel like I'm there already. Surley someplace I woul like to visit )

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      Kathryn Grace 3 years ago from San Francisco

      Once again your amazing photographs and comfortable writing style take me to places I've never been and likely never will. Thank you for this delightful tour and for the food. Your joy in the textures, flavors and colors of food always grabs me.

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      Renaissance Woman 3 years ago from Colorado

      Kyoto has been near the top of my travel wish list for many years. This preview is very enticing. I won't go in summer, but can imagine myself there in the fall. Thanks for another view into your fascinating world.

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      Cheryl Fay Mikesell 3 years ago from Ladysmith, WI

      What a nice tour. So many lovely pictures and yummy foods. Awesome lens.

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      David Stone 3 years ago from New York City

      I enjoyed your latest tour of interesting spots in Japan. You make it seem so accessible.

    • Merrci profile image

      Merry Citarella 3 years ago from Oregon's Southern Coast

      You are really going to have to start offering tours, Smine27! Your articles are always so interesting and appealing. Love seeing all the foods too, though it always makes me hungry! Great lens!