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Twickenham, West London, England

Updated on October 23, 2014

Twickenham and St. Margarets, West London

Twickenham is famous as the home of British rugby, the location of the international Rugby Stadium and Rugby Museum, but it is also an ancient town, which features in the Doomesday Book. It is just a mile from Richmond, over the bridge, or a slightly longer walk along the tow-path of the river. There is also a foot ferry from Ham House to the wonderful Marble Hill House and Park on the Twickenham side, near the Orleans House art gallery (free) There are also many good pubs and independent restaurants in Twickenham, near the river. Eel Pie Island across a small foot bridge and another free outdoor art gallery in the grounds of York House.

The beautiful Royal Kew Botanical Kew Gardens are also about 2 miles away. Wimbledon, the home of British Lawn Tennis is less than 10 miles away. Richmond Hill, with the best view in London, is also just 2 miles away.

Twickenham is also home to The Rt Hon Dr.Vince Cable the Business Secretary (known as "The Sage of Twickenham") one of the few politicians who warned of the impending Credit Crunch and has talked sense throughout the financial crisis. Now part of the Lib-Con coalition government.

Map of Twickenham - Map of St Margarets, Twickenham and Richmond

The old towns of Richmond and Twickenham sit on either side of the river and the much newer London "village" of St. Margarets was built in Victorian times at the half way point between the two railway stations.

A markertwickenham, England -
twickenham, England
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Marble Hill House, Twickenham

Geogian, Palladian villa in Marble Hill Park

Marble Hill House, next to the river Thames in Twickenham, is a beautiful Geogian, Palladian villa in Marble Hill Park. It is now an English Heritage property, originally built for Henrietta Howard a mistress of King George II. The setting is wonderful, opposite Ham House, on the other side of the river and just a few miles from Hampton Court. The grounds are used for summer picnic concerts, but for the rest of the year the park is completely open to the public for free. Visiting the house is interesting and inexpensive with well restored interior, some restored furniture and also offers great views of this beautiful part of London.

Marble Hill House and park are a short walk from Twickenham and St. Margarets railway stations with links to Clapham Junction and Waterloo and Richmond underground station is just 1.5 miles away. There was a series of elegant villas along the Thames between Richmond and Hampton court, but only Marble Hill Remains intact. It is well restored and in a wonderful location next to the river.

York House, Twickenham

Views from York House across the Thames

York House belongs to Richmond Borough Council and is not open to the public, unlike Marble Hill, but it is a beautiful building with stunning grounds, which has been used as a film-set. The grounds are open to the public, for free, and are a good route to take to Twickenham riverside, over an old bridge. There is a huge fountain with ornate classical statues and lovely views across the river to Eel Pie Island. There are also tennis courts in the grounds, which can be rented by the hour.

View from York House (Sion Road)

View from York House (Sion Road)
View from York House (Sion Road)

Other Places Nearby

Richmond-upon-Thames is just a short walk from Twickenham

Richmond Park is also just the other side of the river at the top of Richmond Hill

Kew Gardens, the beautiful Royal botanical gardens, is about 2 miles away

River Thames

River Thames
River Thames

Marble Hill House and Park, Twickenham

Marble Hill House and Park, Twickenham
Marble Hill House and Park, Twickenham

Twickenham and Rugby Football Union

Twickenham is not the birthplace of Rugby: It was invented at Rugby School (in Rugby, Warwickshire, England), but Twickenham is the adopted home of Rugby Football Union, because this is the location of the international stadium, where many of the big matches are held, conveniently located for central London and Heathrow airport.

Wild Parakeet

Wild Parakeet
Wild Parakeet

St Margarets

St. Margaret's Village sits between Twickenham and Richmond and was mostly built during the Victorian era on the site of St. Margaret's House, which was in Twickenham Park (which no longer exists). It was a convenient location for a railway station halfway between those serving its bigger neighbours.

St. Margarets claim to fame is that it was home to the painter, Turner (before the Victorian expansion) and his house is still there although not generally open to the public as it is a private residence. It is also home to Twickenham Studios. Some of Turner's famous paintings were painted from the Terrace at the top of Richmond Hill, just a mile or so away.

St. Margarets has a good selection of traditional pubs and restaurants.

Brula is the sister restaurant to La Buvette in Richmond (see the full review here: Richmond Restaurants)

The Turk's Head Pub in St. Margarets is also home to The Bear Cat Club: A comedy club featuring many famous names on the British comedy scene. It is an excellent club: small and intimate, packed into the small back room of the pub, but still hosting many of the big-names from television.

The White Swan Pub, Twickenham Riverside

The White Swan Pub, Twickenham Riverside
The White Swan Pub, Twickenham Riverside

Sion Road, St. Margarets

Sion Road, St. Margarets
Sion Road, St. Margarets

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    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 5 years ago

      I would love to visit there.

    • Mary Crowther profile image

      Mary Crowther 5 years ago from Havre de Grace

      I can see myself having a delightful lunch at the White Swan Pub!

    • SayGuddaycom profile image

      SayGuddaycom 5 years ago

      Very cool place to visit

    • BobBlackUK profile image

      BobBlackUK 6 years ago

      I used to work in Heath Road, Twickenham, though I lived in Surrey, and over the years visited the town many times on business and pleasure. Then there were the rugby days! Your lens and pictures have brought back some great memories.

    • Grasmere Sue profile image

      Sue Dixon 7 years ago from Grasmere, Cumbria, UK

      Who would have thought that Twickenham could be so interesting!? ( apart from the rugby I mean)

      A great idea for a lens, - I really enjoyed it- Blessed by a new angel.

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 8 years ago

      One day I'll visit Great Britian and see all the wonderful places you've photographed.

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 8 years ago

      Beautiful pictures

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Now that's a lot more information to remember about the origin of Rugby--guess I'll need to carry a little notebook with all those facts. I happened by again because Susie tweeted this and I was drawn back to this wonderful experience![in reply to AndyPo]

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      There is a lot of history and culture in England that is so interesting, fascinating!

      I don't even know if we have rugby in the United states of America. I should find out...oh, there must be somewhere. A gem of a lens to visit Andy!

      Have a wonderful day!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      There is a lot of history and culture in England that is so interesting, fascinating!

      I don't even know if we have rugby in the United states of America. I should find out...oh, there must be somewhere. A gem of a lens to visit Andy!

      Have a wonderful day!

    • Andy-Po profile image
      Author

      Andy 8 years ago from London, England

      Oops. I better make myself a bit clearer in the bit about Rugby. Twickenham is not actually the birthplace of Rugby. It was invented at Rugby School (in Rugby, Warwickshire, England), but Twickenham is the "adopted" home of Rugby Football Union, because this is the location of the international stadium, where many of the big matches are held and The Rugby Museum. This is probably because the stadium needed to be near central London and Heathrow Airport. I'll add some detail in the text. Thanks again for the kind remarks.

      [in reply to Shelly]

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Could you make this lttle tour any sweeter! (I know that was a question, but I like it as an exclamation better) I hope someone wonders about the birthplace of rugby soon and I can brightly say, "Twickenham"! This is not common knowledge in the USA. I notice that there seems to be a generous supply of pubs as one visits around, no need for one to go thirsty!

      I've also visited a couple more of your lenses this morning, "The Amazon Jungle Experience (Brazil) and am glad to experience it through your lens--the mosquitos here are quite bad enough!

      "The Rocky Mountaineer Train Journey in Canada" is sheer delight and you leave us with a desire to experience it for ourselves!

      Now, I don't think it can possibly be considered the evil word "spam" if I mention your own lenses in guest books! I would say to all, just visit and enjoy!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      My soon to be husband lives in London and I commute to Kensington where we currently have a flat, but we are moving to St. Margret's and I am so thankful to have your site...it gives me good insite......can't wait!

    • Andy-Po profile image
      Author

      Andy 8 years ago from London, England

      That's very interesting. I too am a physicist. I expect Twickenham hasn't changed that much actually. I live just the other side of the river at the top of Richmond Hill, although I don't know St Mary's School. I too was as school at about the same time and bad food in British schools was a problem in those days (apparently much better now) You may have fed the ducks at "The Embankment" in Twickenham, which hasn't changed at all because the local council has been discussing how to develop the area for about 50 years (literally) The beautiful old disused art deco swimming pool next to the Thames will be developed but into what: a cinema; shops; apartments; all of the above... Each time they come to a decision we vote them out and a new local government starts again.

      [in reply to LairMistress]

    • LairMistress profile image

      Karen I Olsen 8 years ago from Seattle, WA USA

      I'm an American now living in Seattle; but when I was seven years old (second grade) in the fall of 1971, my family and I spent the whole semester living in Twickenham. We had an apartment there; my dad was a guest physicist at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL); and my brother (age 6 then) and I went to an Anglican primary school called St. Mary's. What I most remember was visiting the Thames river and feeding ducks and swans almost every day after school; the school had a great reading program, horrible cafeteria food, and a playground with no equipment (you just kind of stood around and talked with other kids, and tried to avoid the class bullies if possible). We used to visit places like Kew Gardens, Windsor Castle, and our favorite, Hampton Court Palace (the maze was to die for!). I saw the area again in 1985 while studying in Ireland my third year of college; but haven't been back since. I imagine it's changed a bit since then...

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 8 years ago

      Andy, so this would be a great location to see in a picture with the traveling squid. So, are you going to join the traveling squid project? Huh? ;)

    • religions7 profile image

      religions7 8 years ago

      Great lens - you've been blessed by a squidoo angel :)

    • SandyMertens profile image

      Sandy Mertens 8 years ago from Frozen Tundra

      Some day I will have to go there before I die. Nice lens.

    • Lynx92 profile image

      Lynx92 8 years ago

      Great lens Andy, 5*. Just like Poddys, I love the area. In my previous job (prior 2005) I was an Account Manager for a large IT Company and my customers included RBG Kew, Hampton Court Palace and many more well known attractions in and around London. I got paid to visit the major visitor attractions!

    • TonyPayne profile image

      Tony Payne 8 years ago from Southampton, UK

      Nice lens Andy, 5***** I love the area, Richmond and Twickenham are great, Kew Gardens makes a fantastic day out, and Richmond Park and Hampton Court are all close by.