A tribute to my father:the Artist, he died at a young age born 1900 died 1953 loved horses very talented

Bud Hoglund

 

Born 1900   died 1953. 

Everyone knew him as Bud. The first American born of a large immigrant family in Northern Minnesota, he left school after the sixth grade and ventured out on his own. Like so many of the day, worked at various things. I recall seeing a picture of him on a railroad handcar.

Dad's logo

I believe this dates back to the 1930's. My parents lived on Fremont in Minneapolis before moving to Des Moines.
I believe this dates back to the 1930s. My parents lived on Fremont in Minneapolis before moving to Des Moines.

Chalk Talk

This is my own attempt to show what chalk talk looks like.
This is my own attempt to show what chalk talk looks like.

Chalk Talk

At one time he  worked  in vaudeville theaters  “between the acts” with “chalk talk.  He would be on stage with a blackboard and ask the audience to call out letters of numbers., then write these on the board and make pictures of the letters.

 Since I was only 16 when he died and he mostly worked nights when I grew up I did not know much about his early life. I recall that when we got our first TV he would comment about some performer. At the time I didn’t think it was much different than if I might say-there’s James Garner. It never occurred to me that he might actually have known some of those people.

Donkey

This is a drawing of a donkey dad made.
This is a drawing of a donkey dad made.
Dad's comic strip
Dad's comic strip

Humor

Bud was noted for his sense of humor. It was a dry humor when it came to remarks of stories, but he also loved practical jokes. My mother, by the way, probably didn’t appreciate either. Dad often played pranks on his sister-in-law. One I remember was on a Christmas Eve. We went to my aunt and Uncles place for the evening.

It was wartime and cigarettes were rationed and both my dad and aunt were smokers. Dad prepared a box that was, first of all, grubby with dust and dirt. He took a pack of cigarettes and attached them to the bottom of the box with numerous nails. He also took some home made candy called “divinity candy” and spread it on the bottom of the dirty box. When my aunt opened the box her reaction was—she wasn’t going to remove the nails until she was sure there were actually cigarettes in the package.

His humor showed in some of his art. In the 1920’s he published a comic strip in the Elk River, Minnesota newspaper.

Engraver

When I grew up he was a Photo Engraver, a trade many people are unaware of. In the days before offset printing a photo engraver prepared pictures for printing. This consisted of burning the images onto metal plates with chemicals. It was an art related trade and he was active in the union. He always wanted to start his own shop but it was cut short by his death.

I'm not sure when this was taken but I remember the jacket which I wore for a long time.
I'm not sure when this was taken but I remember the jacket which I wore for a long time.

Horse

I still have this statue, although it is not in as good a shape as it was when I took this picture.
I still have this statue, although it is not in as good a shape as it was when I took this picture.

Horses

Dad was involved with a variety of art but his favorite project was horses. Horses fascinated him. We went to rodeos, horse shows and western movies. Anyplace with horses. He made horse statues and always making new ones with different characteristics. Some times the manes and tails were made from real horsehair, which he collected at horse shows.

He started by sculpting in clay. He made molds of the separate parts—legs, base, body and ears. Also tails when he didn’t use horsehair. Most of the parts were made in half mold and merged together later. In the beginning the molds, as well as the horses, were made of plaster of Paris. Later he experimented with latex and other materials for molds. I did get in on casting some of the parts. Horses ears were often cast in lead as plaster tended to break.

He painted them with oil paints.

In many instances he gave the horses saddles and bridles. The cantle, I recall was cast in plaster. Most of the rest was mostly cut from leather, which he hand tooled

Commercial Art

 Commercial Art

An advertising agency was looking for someone to design make some figurines for some advertising campaigns. Someone referred them to Dad and we got involved in producing these in the basement.  It might have become a second career for dad but he didn’t live long enough to complete the contracts. My older brother helped to complete some of it.

Note.

Hubber Peggy W encouraged me to write about my father. I've put it off because the original pictures are unavailable to me at the moment and these are somewhat lesser quality. However, to ever get anything done we sometimes have to make do with what we have instead of waiting for the ideal. I will add or substitute pictures here when they are available.

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Comments 19 comments

Vern 6 years ago

Interesting tribute!

Was the picture on the handcar a photo or drawing?

How long did the comic strip run?


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

The picture on the handcar was a photo. I don't really know how long the strip ran. It was before I was born. I used to have several of the strips but I don't know if there were more or not. I only remember my mother telling that dad traveled all over the state to sell it. I always thought when they moved to Des Moines the connetion might have ceased.


eovery profile image

eovery 6 years ago from MIddle of the Boondocks of Iowa

Wow, your dad was talented. Nice memories.

Keep on hubbing!


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Thanks for your comment.I he was talented but he didn't really know how to make money from his art--except for his job.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

Wow! Your Dad was really talented! I loved the donkey drawing. Shows not only talent but humor. Couldn't read the comic strip as the print was too small but just knowing that he created those is amazing. The horses! I'll bet that if you took one of those to an Antique Roadshow event...you might be surprised at the value. All handmade with real horsehair and hand-tooled leather tooling...BESIDES the horses being beautiful...I'll just bet that there is some real value to them! Great hub! Enjoyed it immensely. Sad to hear that your Dad died when you were only 16. My father's dad (the grandfather I never knew) died when he was only 7. At least you (and we) have the stories which continue. THANKS for sharing this about your Dad.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Peggy W

Thanks for your reply and interest.If you click on the cartoon you should get an enlarged image. at least it worked for me.Somewhere I have a slide of the mural from the basement of my mother's house, which I think my daughter has.Also the figurines from the ad campaigns. I don't hink there are very maany horses left. My brother had at least one but his house burned down and everything was lost. He got a new house but things like that are gone forever.

I still have that horse but the saddle is lost.Also the legs were broken and we got sombody to fix it but it isn't quite the same.

I believe dad did have some people with race horses approach hism to do portraits but he turned them down, thinking they would not be willing to pay enough to make it worthwhile. I think he might have been surprised what such people would have been willing to pay.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 6 years ago from Houston, Texas

I agree, the race horse owners would probably have paid a "pretty penny" for those handmade horses of your Dad's. They are beautiful. Too bad that you do not have many left in the family...but that is the way it goes sometimes. Maybe as you find more things you can keep adding to this hub. It is already very interesting!


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Thanks. Due to several relocation and such many things got lost or left with others for "safekeeping" except that did not always work out.


creativeone59 profile image

creativeone59 6 years ago from Gold Canyon, Arizona

Thank you dahoglund, for a very touching and moving story about your father and his many talents. Thank you for sharing. Godspeed. creativeone59


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Thank you very much for your comment.I'm glad to see that people outside the family are interested.


agvulpes profile image

agvulpes 6 years ago from Australia

Bud, I would first like to thank Peggy W for encouraging you to publish this Hub. It is a great tribute to a very talented man, and it is obvious that you had a lot of love and respect for him. What a shame that he died at such a young age, but you are fortune in that you do have some great memories of him :-)


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

agvulpes,

Thanks for commenting. Over so many years and several relocations for us many things have gotten lost, broken or misplaced. I thought I'd better do this with the materials at hand while I could.


Kinghorn 6 years ago

This is the sort of writing that all ought to attempt. It's very nice. 4315 Fremont is close to 4246 Irving, my grand parent's house in the 30's and where I lived during grade-school years.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Bill,

Thanks for your observations.I've always aimed for a somewhat straightforward style, rather than an elegant one.


Elise 6 years ago

A nice tribute to the grandfather I unfortunately never knew. And unfortunately didn't inherit any of his artistic abilities. Learned a few new things as well about him. I think Wally had 3 or 4 of those horses before his house burned down.

I should have those slides around, and I'll try to get them to you.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

Elise,

Nice to hear from you and thanks for commenting. The picture of the horse here was from a slice I had. Walmart put it on a CD for me and it cost less than a quarter, although I forget the exact amount. Take care.


habee profile image

habee 6 years ago from Georgia

Gosh, this is just awesome! I'm also from a family of artists.


dahoglund profile image

dahoglund 6 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids Author

I appreciate your comments.


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 5 years ago from Germany

A very good tribute to your father. Well done! Thanks for sharing.

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