Drawing Dogs

Drawing dogs can be enjoyable for people of all ages and ability levels. First, spend time sketching out the dog with a pencil, and then decide which medium to use for coloring in the drawing. Using colored pencils is a good idea because these can be erased if there are minor mishaps, and these can be purchased in sets for cheap prices. Also, consider visiting the library, bookstore, or Amazon to find books that give useful tips on colored pencil techniques. Artists can also consult online forums and art websites that teach people how to use colored pencils. I have read books and watched videos on colored pencil drawing, but ultimately I like to use methods that speak to me. Remember: art is a very personal thing, and the way one artist draws a dog will differ from her neighbor. In other words, everyone should learn to cultivate their own artistic style when drawing dogs.

The framed picture of Buster is a sentimental way to commemorate a dearly departed pet.
The framed picture of Buster is a sentimental way to commemorate a dearly departed pet. | Source
Here I drew the building behind Buster.
Here I drew the building behind Buster. | Source

You want to finish sketching your dog before embarking on the journey of shading in your drawing in with colored pencils.

Here is a YouTube video I made to show what the framed Buster illustration looks like hanging on the wall. This picture is hanging next to other animal portraits that I have created of my dearly departed pets, such as Lady dog. Drawing a picture of your dog and other pets is a creative and economical way to create personalized art for the walls of your home.

The final details are being added to Buster.
The final details are being added to Buster. | Source

Make sure to add the final details to your sketch before adding the color. This is what I did when I was drawing Buster.

Some final details have been added to Buster before I color him in.
Some final details have been added to Buster before I color him in. | Source

Never be hesitant to continue to add extra details to your sketch before beginning the colored pencil painting of the dog.

Here I am beginning to add the tan color to Buster's head.
Here I am beginning to add the tan color to Buster's head. | Source

In the reference photograph Buster was the color of banana nut bread, so I used a light tan colored pencil to lay down the main color of his fur coat. I layered the other colors on top of this foundation of tan.

Here I finished coloring in Buster with the tan colored pencil, and began to shade in his darker patches of fur.
Here I finished coloring in Buster with the tan colored pencil, and began to shade in his darker patches of fur. | Source

Carefully color in the base color of your dog, and then you are ready to add any extra layers of color. I always approach coloring my drawings like coloring a picture in a coloring book; I always strive to stay in the lines. However, the beauty of colored pencils means you can erase your mistakes easily.

Here I shaded in the dark patches on Buster's head and muzzle.
Here I shaded in the dark patches on Buster's head and muzzle. | Source

Adding the darker patches to the sketch of your dog helps to bring the drawing to life. I started to see Buster jump off the page once I shaded in the darker portions to his mask.

I continued to add the dark patches to Buster's face.
I continued to add the dark patches to Buster's face. | Source

Also, shading in the dark brown portions to Buster's fur coat made him look more true to life. Take as much time as you desire on your colored pencil paintings, which means you will be more pleased with the final product than if you rush.

Once Buster was completlycolored in, I added the green color to his collar.
Once Buster was completlycolored in, I added the green color to his collar. | Source

If your dog is wearing a collar in the reference photograph, it is always ideal to use the exact same color when coloring this in on your drawing. You can always change the color of your dog's color for the illustration, but I decided to remain true to my sketch of Buster by using a forest green colored pencil.

I colored the background behind Buster with a chocolate brown shade of colored pencil.
I colored the background behind Buster with a chocolate brown shade of colored pencil. | Source

Coloring in the vertical boards of the garage behind Buster's deck gave my photograph an interesting background. Sometimes I change the background for my sketches and paintings, but I decided to keep this one true to life.

This is where I added the lighter brown shade to Buster's beloved deck.
This is where I added the lighter brown shade to Buster's beloved deck. | Source

To create the depth of the background, I used forty-five degree angle strokes when coloring in the sienna brown of Buster's deck.

I have finished coloring in the sketch of Buster.
I have finished coloring in the sketch of Buster. | Source

Now that the sketch of Buster standing on his deck is complete, I am ready to cut off the bottom half of the paper.

Scanned version of the drawing of Buster standing on his deck.
Scanned version of the drawing of Buster standing on his deck. | Source

Here is the scanned version of Buster standing on his beloved deck, which is where I used to see him every day I went out to play with him in the backyard. The color pencil painting of Buster was created with a combination of Crayola and Prismacolor pencils because I tend to mix and match my pencils, and also because I use my art supplies up before I buy a new set. I sketched this picture of Buster on acid free, medium weight drawing paper. Consider drawing a picture of your own dog as a way to commemorate your four legged friend.

Have you ever created a colored pencil sketch of your dog?

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Comments 11 comments

agusfanani profile image

agusfanani 5 years ago from Indonesia

A good drawing technique, thank you for sharing.


alekhouse profile image

alekhouse 5 years ago from Louisville, Kentucky

You've done a great job on this. Anyone should be able to follow your directions.


susannah42 profile image

susannah42 5 years ago from Florida

Your pic is great. You make it look so easy, wish I could do it.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

A great and useful hub. You make it look so easy that I may have a shot at it myself.

Thanks for sharing.

Take care

Eiddwen.


SaMcNutt profile image

SaMcNutt 5 years ago from Englewood, CO

Very fun. I love sketching but, I haven't done it in awhile. This makes me want to draw again. BTW I like your style.


Dexter Yarbrough profile image

Dexter Yarbrough 5 years ago from United States

Wow! Outstanding work. Bravo and thanks for sharing!


C-Bless profile image

C-Bless 5 years ago from Canada

Woof! Woof! Sketching 101 made easy. Thank you for the tips...


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 5 years ago from Southern California, USA Author

agusfanani,

Thank you for your comments.

Alekhouse,

I am glad you think this tutorial is easy to follow, and I did strive to make it this way.

Susannah42,

You might surprise yourself if you start sketching, so I always suggest giving it a try. I believe every artist has their own style.

Eiddwen,

I hope you have fun if you decide to draw a picture of your dog. Maybe you can even writing a tutorial helping others.

SaMcNutt,

I appreciate your comments, and would love to see some of your artwork.

Dexter Yarbough,

Thanks for reading and commenting on my dog sketch.

C-Bless,

I really like the Woof, Woof 101, that is cute!


Wooded 5 years ago

I was waiting for Part 2 and I will have to try it out myself now. Your's came out great!!!


SweetiePie profile image

SweetiePie 5 years ago from Southern California, USA Author

Glad you enjoyed this hub Wooded!


Hello, hello, profile image

Hello, hello, 5 years ago from London, UK

Well explained and detailed. Thank you.

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