How To Photograph Food At Home

Want to make your food photos look fantastic?

I will show you how to photograph food at home for professional results so you can use them in recipe articles or hubs. There’s no need for a fancy camera that costs $$$, all you need is an automatic point and click camera that takes sharp, in-focus photos. And, of course, you'll need some lovely food to photograph!

The idea for this hub came to me from CraftytotheCore, who commented on my Saganaki Recipe photos. I thought “It really isn’t all that hard, maybe I should share my techniques so that other people can do the food photography for their recipes.” So here we are…

You will need:

  • An automatic point and shoot digital camera
  • Food to photograph
  • A table (optional)
  • A white sheet or white paper (optional)
  • Adobe Photoshop (or similar graphics program)

I will teach you how to make photos that look like this:

Get some vibrant colour into your food photography with my techniques!
Get some vibrant colour into your food photography with my techniques!
Food which has been photographed and cut out and placed on a white background in Photoshop.
Food which has been photographed and cut out and placed on a white background in Photoshop.
An example of a badly-shot indoor photo which is grainy, somewhat blurry and has shadows in the way.
An example of a badly-shot indoor photo which is grainy, somewhat blurry and has shadows in the way.
A failed indoor effort with the flash.
A failed indoor effort with the flash.

Are you tired of looking at horrible indoor food photos?

  • Yes - Can't stand them
  • No - They look more authentic
See results without voting

Step 1: Preparing Your Location

If you’ve been creating food photography inside, then you will know that you get grainy, dark and sometimes blurry shots that just don’t look very good, even if you try hard to get the photo shoot to work.

This is because your camera is automatic and needs lots of white light to get a sharp, in-focus picture. Fluorescent lighting or a flash helps, but it isn’t perfect because the photos can be grainy, and considering you want magazine style photography, it’s probably best to spend five minutes extra setting up a proper shooting space.

Even if you try to photograph near a large window with lots of natural light, you can still get shadows that prevent food from looking perfect.

Can you flip the picture the other way and have it still look good? If it looks somehow weird, but you can’t quite tell why, then shadows may be the problem. So the best solution is to remove most of the shadows.

The ideal location is outside. If you pick an overcast light time (such as dawn or dusk, or the middle of the day on a cloudy day) then you will get the vibrant colours showing through in the end result.

Do not do this type of photography when there is lots of sunshine as there is too much white light and it makes the colours less vibrant.

There are two ways to photograph food outside.

The dappled shadows in this pie in a garden scene make the photo look even better.
The dappled shadows in this pie in a garden scene make the photo look even better.

Using Garden Surroundings

If you have a nice garden or a particular spot that would look good as the background of a photograph, move a table outside and set up your food on it.

If you want to put your food onto a white background in Photoshop later, make sure there are no shadows cast on the food by errant trees, neighbouring rooves and other items.

Sometimes shadows can be quite artistic though, depending on how they are used. In the context of having food with a garden background, feel free to play with shadows, though not on a blindingly sunny day as too much white light will make the colours look washed out (faded).

My homemade backdrop made out of a garden chair and a white sheet.
My homemade backdrop made out of a garden chair and a white sheet.
An example of taking the photo against the chair backdrop.
An example of taking the photo against the chair backdrop.

Using A Backdrop

This method is for creating the photos with the white background in Photoshop.

Grab a white sheet and set it up so you have a “floor” and a “wall”. Make sure the floor has plenty of space to work with and is situated in such a way that you can photograph the food without the wall casting a shadow over the food.

In this case, I used a garden chair and tucked the bit of sheet between floor and wall under the chair legs. You can also use white paper with nothing printed or written on it and tape the back sides together to form a sheet.

The reason for using a white backdrop is because if you were just to photograph the food on a normal background, the background can reflect light and put different hues or “casts” onto the food. Also, when you cut out food later on in Photoshop, it is best to have a white “fringe” to work with so that the cut is very clean, easier to do and natural looking.

It is important there are no shadows at all on the food when using a white backdrop.

Step 2: Preparing The Food

You can see from the saganaki photos I took that I spent a few minutes making the food look presentable.

My saganaki photo. Notice I've placed parsley, lemon and olives on the plate as well as sprinkling it with dried mixed herbs.
My saganaki photo. Notice I've placed parsley, lemon and olives on the plate as well as sprinkling it with dried mixed herbs.
A good example of using simple plate colours to enhance the food.
A good example of using simple plate colours to enhance the food.

Plates & Platters

Pick lovely platters, bowls and cutlery to use and try to imagine how the food will look on it. Is the design too busy or distracting to show small elements (eg dried herbs)? If you use white dinnerware, do you want a plate to blend into a white background completely or for it to stand out from the background?

In my humble opinion, you really can’t go wrong with dishes that have 1-2 plain colours on them, with minimal embellishment. A nice decorative rim works well, but where the food is placed should be of a plain colour.

You’ll see I used a white plate for the saganaki photos. The reason for this is that my best blue plate was hidden in the bottom of the sink that day, so I made sure when I used the white plate to put it on a chopping board for a background (see photo #2).

As you can see, it does blend into the background a touch, but I was too excited to worry about changing the plate and the effect was OK anyway.

An example of using props. In this case, the photographer used fresh rosemary and olive oil with a plain background.
An example of using props. In this case, the photographer used fresh rosemary and olive oil with a plain background.

Props

You’ll notice that many good food photos have props in them. This helps the photo to be more interesting. I like to use natural props with lots of colour (such as fresh herbs, fruit or vegetables) to embellish the photo.

You can use anything that reminds you of the food ingredients. This could include packaged ingredients, natural ingredients, colourful utensils, napkins, tablecloths (for when you are not cutting the photo out), flowers or more.

If you are stuck for inspiration, try looking at a few food photographs to get ideas.

Examples Of Different Angles

Don't be afraid to let bits be chopped off the photo for a change. Sometimes these shots can work really well.
Don't be afraid to let bits be chopped off the photo for a change. Sometimes these shots can work really well.
Top down view. I always take one of these in case I want it later.
Top down view. I always take one of these in case I want it later.
Get up close to the food and see if it looks better that way.
Get up close to the food and see if it looks better that way.

Step 3: The Photo Shoot

Take some photos of your food, concentrating on making sure the food is in the foreground and focused. Often, you can hold down an automatic camera button halfway and it will focus for you.

Look at the photo you are taking and imagine if it will go into a magazine. Does the background look suitable and enhance the picture? Can you see too many props? Is anything detracting from the food itself because it is too brightly coloured or busy in design?

Angles are very important. When you do a photo shoot, walk around the food and take many different photos from different heights and angles. Change the camera setting to close ups (the flower icon instead of the mountain icon) and go in really close for a detailed view of the food.

With the white sheet on the ground, I had to lay on my stomach to capture the saganaki photos!

You should take lots of photos in any photo shoot, to make sure you have plenty to pick from when selecting the final one to use.

Also, you need to take quite a few photos because sometimes you get random elements such as flies, wind, hair or hands that make their way into the photo when you don’t see them.

Step 4: Selecting A Suitable Photo

The best photo is the one that looks "right", with the elements sitting together nicely. Don't worry about the colours/lightness just yet, that is what Photoshop is for.

One way you can choose the right photo is to look at each picture and flick through them. You can certainly see the bad ones straight away, so eliminate those. Now pick between the good ones!

Hmmm....which photo is best? It all depends on the eye of the beholder, so there are no right or wrong choices, but if you picked the middle one, you have a designer's eye.
Hmmm....which photo is best? It all depends on the eye of the beholder, so there are no right or wrong choices, but if you picked the middle one, you have a designer's eye.

Step 5: Dressing Up The Photo In Photoshop

Follow these instructions to make a photo look colourful and vibrant.

Step By Step Screenshots

All of the steps are in order in the gallery below. Click on the big gallery photo under the thumbnails (don't click on the thumbnails) to see a larger view for clarification, as I've highlighted necessary elements.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
1. File/Open.2. Choosing Image/Adjustments/Levels.2. Moving the triangles in Image/Adjustments/Levels.3. Selecting Hue & Saturation.3. Moving the saturation arrow to the right.4. Choosing Image Size.4 & 5. Setting image size to 72dpi and 800px wide.6. Select the crop tool. Then draw a box where you want to cut the photo. A dotted line will appear.6. Let go of the mouse button and a black area is highlighted. Choose the arrow tool from the left toolbar. Then click Crop.7. Choose File/Save for Web & Devices, then in the box which opens choose JPEG, Very High and Save in that order.
1. File/Open.
1. File/Open.
2. Choosing Image/Adjustments/Levels.
2. Choosing Image/Adjustments/Levels.
2. Moving the triangles in Image/Adjustments/Levels.
2. Moving the triangles in Image/Adjustments/Levels.
3. Selecting Hue & Saturation.
3. Selecting Hue & Saturation.
3. Moving the saturation arrow to the right.
3. Moving the saturation arrow to the right.
4. Choosing Image Size.
4. Choosing Image Size.
4 & 5. Setting image size to 72dpi and 800px wide.
4 & 5. Setting image size to 72dpi and 800px wide.
6. Select the crop tool. Then draw a box where you want to cut the photo. A dotted line will appear.
6. Select the crop tool. Then draw a box where you want to cut the photo. A dotted line will appear.
6. Let go of the mouse button and a black area is highlighted. Choose the arrow tool from the left toolbar. Then click Crop.
6. Let go of the mouse button and a black area is highlighted. Choose the arrow tool from the left toolbar. Then click Crop.
7. Choose File/Save for Web & Devices, then in the box which opens choose JPEG, Very High and Save in that order.
7. Choose File/Save for Web & Devices, then in the box which opens choose JPEG, Very High and Save in that order.

NOTE: You can do the step 6 cropping after step 1 if you want to see how your photo will look more accurately.

Instructions

  1. Open Photoshop and select File/Open then choose your ideal photo.
  2. Choose Image/Adjustments/Levels and move the little triangles for black and white in a bit until you get the desired effect. Click OK.
  3. Select Image/Adjustments/Hue & Saturation. Move the saturation triangle to the right until the photo has a bit of extra colour.
  4. Choose Image/Image Size and in the Resolution field, type 72 pixels/inch (for web resolution). Make sure you do this step BEFORE the next one.
  5. With the Image Size box still open, type in the Width box 800 pixels. Click OK.
  6. If you want to crop (resize) the photo, select the Crop tool. Draw a box where you would like to cut the photo. A dotted line will appear as you draw. When you let go of the mouse, it will show the area you wish to crop. Click the arrow tool, then click Crop.
  7. Choose File/Save For Web & Devices and choose JPEG and Very High in the top left area and click Save.
  8. Congratulations, you now have a good web food photograph!

Step 6 (Optional): Creating Food On A White Background In Photoshop

Follow these instructions to put food onto a white background.

For best effect, use a white backdrop to take the photos if you want to do this. You can do it with ordinary photos, but reflection from the background means that the food will appear more colourful around the edges than what you intended and won’t blend into the white background properly.

Instructions

Follow all of these steps in order to have a workflow which will allow you to save different versions of the photo for other work. If you’re going to put in the effort, it’s best to keep a high resolution version for later instead of having to repeat path creation again!

Step By Step Screenshots

All of the steps are in order in the gallery below. Click on the big gallery photo under the thumbnails (don't click on the thumbnails) to see a larger view for clarification, as I've highlighted necessary elements.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
1. File/Open.2. Choose Window/Paths.2. On the path palette box which opens, click and hold on the little arrow in the top right of the box. Choose New Path.3. Click on the magnifying glass and hold over the image until you see a + sign. Click to zoom into the picture.3. Use the scrollbars on the bottom and right to move the picture until you see the edge of the food you want to cut out.4. Click on the Pen tool in Photoshop.6. Click on a different point not far away from the original point. You will see that there is a line created.7. Create an outline around the food.8. On the Paths dialogue box, click on the right top arrow and select Make Selection.9. Click on Window/Layers if it isn’t already open. You will see that there is now a separate layer on top of the old one, containing the cut out bit of food. 10. At the bottom of the Layers palette, you will see a page icon, right next to Trash. Click it to create a new layer.10. Click and drag Layer 2 underneath Layer 1 in the Layers palette.12. Click the paint bucket icon and then click it onto the image. The background will turn white.13. Select the blur tool and make the size small enough to work with (see diagram). Set strength in the top menu area box to 25%.Adding a drop shadow by clicking on the right top arrow of the Layers Palette Box and selecting Blending Options.
1. File/Open.
1. File/Open.
2. Choose Window/Paths.
2. Choose Window/Paths.
2. On the path palette box which opens, click and hold on the little arrow in the top right of the box. Choose New Path.
2. On the path palette box which opens, click and hold on the little arrow in the top right of the box. Choose New Path.
3. Click on the magnifying glass and hold over the image until you see a + sign. Click to zoom into the picture.
3. Click on the magnifying glass and hold over the image until you see a + sign. Click to zoom into the picture.
3. Use the scrollbars on the bottom and right to move the picture until you see the edge of the food you want to cut out.
3. Use the scrollbars on the bottom and right to move the picture until you see the edge of the food you want to cut out.
4. Click on the Pen tool in Photoshop.
4. Click on the Pen tool in Photoshop.
6. Click on a different point not far away from the original point. You will see that there is a line created.
6. Click on a different point not far away from the original point. You will see that there is a line created.
7. Create an outline around the food.
7. Create an outline around the food.
8. On the Paths dialogue box, click on the right top arrow and select Make Selection.
8. On the Paths dialogue box, click on the right top arrow and select Make Selection.
9. Click on Window/Layers if it isn’t already open. You will see that there is now a separate layer on top of the old one, containing the cut out bit of food.
9. Click on Window/Layers if it isn’t already open. You will see that there is now a separate layer on top of the old one, containing the cut out bit of food.
10. At the bottom of the Layers palette, you will see a page icon, right next to Trash. Click it to create a new layer.
10. At the bottom of the Layers palette, you will see a page icon, right next to Trash. Click it to create a new layer.
10. Click and drag Layer 2 underneath Layer 1 in the Layers palette.
10. Click and drag Layer 2 underneath Layer 1 in the Layers palette.
12. Click the paint bucket icon and then click it onto the image. The background will turn white.
12. Click the paint bucket icon and then click it onto the image. The background will turn white.
13. Select the blur tool and make the size small enough to work with (see diagram). Set strength in the top menu area box to 25%.
13. Select the blur tool and make the size small enough to work with (see diagram). Set strength in the top menu area box to 25%.
Adding a drop shadow by clicking on the right top arrow of the Layers Palette Box and selecting Blending Options.
Adding a drop shadow by clicking on the right top arrow of the Layers Palette Box and selecting Blending Options.

Adding A Shadow

Add a "drop shadow" (the professional term for it) to the cut out image to make it appear more natural after Step 19. To do this:

1. Click on the layers palette box and select the cut food layer (Layer 1).

2. Click on the top right little arrow in the layers box and select Blending Options.

3. When the Layer Style box opens, click on Drop Shadow. Make sure it is ticked in the left column and adjust the settings to suit. You should be able to see what the drop shadow looks like as you play with the settings.

NOTE: A “path” is an outline for cutting out the food.

  1. Open Photoshop and select File/Open then choose your ideal photo.
  2. Choose Window/Paths and on the Path palette box which opens, click and hold on the little arrow in the top right of the box. Choose New Path.
  3. Click on the magnifying glass and hold over the image until you see a + sign. Click to zoom into the picture. Use the scrollbars on the bottom and right to move the picture until you see the edge of the food you want to cut out.
  4. Click on the Pen tool in Photoshop.
  5. Click on the edge of the food you wish to cut out. This will put a dot there.
  6. Click on a different point not far away from the original point. You will see that there is a line created. This is going to be the outline of the food. If you click and drag at the next point, you can see that the line curves, so you can create curved lines for the outline. Practise with this a bit before proceeding. If you want to delete the dud path, go to the Paths dialogue box, click the arrow in the top right and choose Delete Path. Then start again from Step 2.
  7. Create an outline around the food. You can stop making a path in the middle of it to move the scrollbars around if needed. But any other clicking will stop the path creation and give you an incomplete one. When you get to the end of your path (you have done a complete shape of the food) hover over the first path dot (or “anchor point”) and you should see a circle. Click on the dot to finish the path (when the circle shows, you can the path together in a complete shape).
  8. On the Paths dialogue box, click on the right top arrow and select Make Selection. Make sure feather radius is set to 0 and it is a new selection. Click OK. You will see a moving dotted line.
  9. Choose Edit/Copy, then Edit/Paste. Click on Window/Layers if it isn’t already open. You will see that there is now a separate layer on top of the old one, containing the cut out bit of food. Click the eye icon to the left of the Background layer in the Layers palette to turn off the old image.
  10. At the bottom of the Layers palette, you will see a page icon, right next to Trash. Click it to create a new layer. Click and drag Layer 2 underneath Layer 1 in the Layers palette.
  11. Go to the main toolbar and make sure that you have white selected as a foreground colour (click on the square to change it if needed).
  12. Click the paint bucket icon (also on the main toolbar) and then click it onto the image. The background will turn white.
  13. Go to the Layers palette and click on Layer 1. Select the blur tool and make the size small enough to work with (see diagram). Set strength in the top menu area box to 25%.
  14. Draw right onto the edges of the cut food. You will see that after clicking and dragging on the edges, the edges get blurrier. This means they will blend in better to the white background. You can view the effect by going to View/Actual Pixels to see how it will really look.
  15. When you have finished blending the sharp cut edges into the background with the Blur tool, choose File/Save As.. and save the file as a .psd file. This will preserve all your layers and paths in high resolution, so you can use them for both print and web.
  16. After saving, choose Image/Adjustments/Levels and move the little triangles for black and white in a bit until you get the desired effect. Click OK. To view screenshots of this and all of the other steps after this, look at the tutorial above this one.
  17. Select Image/Adjustments/Hue & Saturation. Move the saturation triangle to the right until the photo has a bit of extra colour.
  18. Choose Image/Image Size and in the Resolution field, type 72 pixels/inch (for web resolution).
  19. With the Image Size box still open, type in the Width box 800 pixels. Click OK.
  20. Choose File/Save For Web & Devices and choose JPEG and Very High in the top left area and click Save.
  21. Congratulations, you now have a food photo on a white background!

I hope I can help you make fantastic food photographs with this tutorial. If you don’t have Photoshop, I believe Paint Shop Pro might also do a similar job (though with slightly different tools). If you want more information on doing this procedure on a Mac or to clarify what I have written, Google “step by step cropping in photoshop” and add in to the search Mac or Paintshop Pro as needed.

For your reference, the camera I use for this type of photography is a Canon Digital IXUS 80 IS, which cost about AU$100 5 years ago. There are probably better ones out there now.

If this tutorial was useful to you, please vote below and support my next automatic camera purchase!

© 2013 Suzanne Day

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Comments 39 comments

jrpierce profile image

jrpierce 3 years ago from Ellijay, Ga

What great information! Thanks for sharing all your tips and advice, it's a wonderful hub.


Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

This is really useful. I have been working on improving my recipe hub photography, but sometimes it's just hard to get that special shot. I take digital pic after pic and then spend time picking which ones I like best. Now I just need to go back to my old recipes and fix those too. Thanks for the tips.


sallybea profile image

sallybea 3 years ago from Norfolk

Suzanne Day - This is going to be so useful for me - I have some tabletop photography to do for a project next year so this comes at a very opportune moment - I love food photography and want to do a lot more of it next year. I especially found the Photoshop tutorial helpful - thank you so much for sharing this.

Voted up.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

How helpful is this! I have noticed that I get better food photos outside, but I don't always take them there. I love the white sheet idea. All votes up and shared!


moonlake profile image

moonlake 3 years ago from America

I was just looking at food recipes on Pinterest and wondering how they were setting them and what program they were using. I don't have Photoshop so I guess that's what many are using. Voted up on your hub.


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

good idea. My photos always turn out dull. I will try your tips


Daddy Paul profile image

Daddy Paul 3 years ago from Michigan

Nice ideas. Will use them on my new series of recipes I am publishing.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

Simply superb. Your instructions, THOSE PHOTOS, the layout of the hub. This is an expertly crafted piece of work, my dear! Voted up across the board except funny, plus sharing and pinning. Gorgeous. You have schooled us.


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

What an awesome hub! What I call "still life" shots can be challenging. These tips would be great for product shots, too. Voted up and sharing!


Sherry Hewins profile image

Sherry Hewins 3 years ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

Great and thorough instructions. I just wanted to mention, for those who can't afford Photoshop, that Gimp is a free photo editing program that has tools that are very similar to it.


Susan Recipes profile image

Susan Recipes 3 years ago from India

Informative hub. Very well explained. Thanks for sharing. Voted up.


CraftytotheCore profile image

CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

Amazing Hub! This is so helpful to everyone. I'm sharing this. Voted Awesome. Thank you. I have tried to photograph food, and sometimes it just doesn't come out looking edible at all. I never thought about the color of the plate or photographing with a garden backdrop. Brilliant!


JPSO138 profile image

JPSO138 3 years ago from Cebu, Philippines, International

I never thought it could be done this way with a point and shoot camera. I always thought that it takes a DSLR camera is a must. But looking at your pictures and the way you do the presentation, no need for DSLR, just a point and shoot and of course your hub as guide.. Up for this one!


Scott P Williams profile image

Scott P Williams 3 years ago from Miami, Florida

Good stuff...I'm gonna pin this. Thanks!


drpennypincher profile image

drpennypincher 3 years ago from Iowa, USA

I take most of my pictures for my blogs with my cell phone camera. Through trial and error, I have found that good lighting makes a huge difference. Thanks for the tips!


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa

Great tips and wonderful photos! I am going to keep this one for future reference.


vespawoolf profile image

vespawoolf 3 years ago from Peru, South America

This is very well written and instructive. Lighting is so important and yet so hard to control. I also take lots of shots so I have more to choose from. You've given me the motivation I need to learn to use photo shop. Thanks so much! Voted up and shared.


denden mangubat profile image

denden mangubat 3 years ago from liloan, cebu, philippines

photoshop foods.thanks for this info about how to use the photoshop.I haven't try editing image with photoshop.mouth watering foods enhanced by photoshop hehe


VVanNess profile image

VVanNess 3 years ago from Prescott Valley

Very nice! Not only did I vote this up, but I shared it with all of my friends. This has been one of my biggest issues, and now I know exactly what to do to have awesome food photos too! Thanks!

Well written, great pictures, lots of variety, amazing article!


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 3 years ago from malang-indonesia

Beautiful...I love photography and you came up with valuable tips. Thanks for writing and sharing with us. Voted up :-)

Prasetio


CWanamaker profile image

CWanamaker 3 years ago from Arizona

Man...you make it look so easy. Thanks for the tips.


iguidenetwork profile image

iguidenetwork 3 years ago from Austin, TX

Wow great tips! I want to take my food pics like they're coming straight out from the cookbooks. There's even a professional occupation (I just heard) called food stylist.

Thanks for posting. Natural light is still the best light when photographing food.


BStoneBlog profile image

BStoneBlog 3 years ago

Brilliant! I've recently self-published a cookbook, and my photos were so poorly executed that I took them out. Can't wait to use your tips for the next edition.


Ranveer Bhatia profile image

Ranveer Bhatia 3 years ago from Calcutta, India

Food photography is a big industry now (special thanks to Pinterest, I just had to...). Thanks for sharing the brilliant tips...


Mike Robbers profile image

Mike Robbers 3 years ago from London

Very interesting hub!!

Voted up!


Rae Saylor profile image

Rae Saylor 3 years ago from Australia

I haven't really tried food photography yet, but this is a really awesome hub and I think the tips you shared are just enough to get me started! So excited!

Thanks for writing this, pal. Voted up!


Efficient Admin profile image

Efficient Admin 2 years ago from Charlotte, NC

Excellent and very detailed hub. There were many helpful tips that I will use next time, like adding color to the plates and I love the way the dish towel is underneath the pan in the first photo. I have never used Photoshop but can tell you put a lot of quality information and time into this hub. Voted up and across and thanks for sharing very useful information.


pocono foothills profile image

pocono foothills 2 years ago from Easton, Pennsylvania

@Suzanne Day-Thanks for the very informative Hub. I've not tried to use PhotoShop before, but now I will have to look into trying it. Voted up.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 2 years ago from Dubai

Great hub and a wonderful tutorial on how to take great food photographs! Thank you for sharing and voted up.


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

this would be great Suzanne if I had a digital camera and Photoshop but since I have neither... However I rated this thumbs up and useful. I also shared it.

Kevin


Haj09 profile image

Haj09 2 years ago from Tunisia

Your hub is very useful, especially for the photoshop part! I love making food and sharing recipes, and this is really gonna help me :) Thank you!


SusannaDuffy profile image

SusannaDuffy 2 years ago from Melbourne Australia

Excellent advice, I'm going to take some more photos of my food using backdrops


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 19 months ago from Houston, Texas

One of these days I need to spend some time to learn how to use Photoshop. Your images paired with your text illustrates the examples perfectly. Up votes and pinning as well as sharing.


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 19 months ago from East Coast, United States

Great advise, not only for food, but useful for taking pictures of crafts and other still life type subjects. Though I use photo shop a little, I must admit to being so impatient that I have trouble with the more complicated instructions. I a m working on learning it slowly! (voted up and shared)


agvulpes profile image

agvulpes 19 months ago from Australia

Great Hub on photographing food. Yep I do see a lot of bad photos on the web that make the food look like it is not fit to eat !


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 19 months ago from North America

Your photos are fantastic and your tutorials are superb and easy to understand. I need to experiment this spring and summer in some good lighting.


Suzanne Day profile image

Suzanne Day 19 months ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Author

In summer, try early in the morning, before the sun starts adding too much light to photos. Another alternative I have found is to work in the shadow of a building during sunny days.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 19 months ago from North America

Thanks very much! I will try your good suggestions.


Gina Welds-Hulse profile image

Gina Welds-Hulse 2 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

Great tips. Thanks for sharing.

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