Employers Who Complain About a Lack of Qualified Applicants

The economy remains in bad shape. Unemployment hovers around 10% or more, depending on the stats you believe. For every job there are at least six applicants, probably more, maybe 20 applicants. Google receives 1000 resumes every few days. Yet, some companies complain that they have jobs that they cannot fill because they cannot find qualified applicants.

Part of the unemployment problem is this. Because this is a employer's market with millions out of work, they are overly picky, they always want an applicant to be all things, have all the skills listed (many they will seldom use but are nice to have) and then pay lower wages. Granted, some jobs do require certain types of education and experience and skills, but really, many jobs do not, like technician type jobs, say installing satellite dishes, installing home alarm systems, some manufacturing jobs, even some jobs in IT.

What happens is that the company creates a job announcement with basic requirements and preferred requirements, meaning unless you have all of the preferred specs, your chances are far less in getting the job. Employers, because of the bad economy, are more headstrong than ever in waiting and waiting and waiting until they find the perfect person. If they don't, they whine about being unable to fill it because of a lack a skillsets in the applicants.

Well, how about lowering the requirements and train them? What a novel idea. Many of the blue collar jobs are not rocket science jobs, many can be learned by those with only a High School or two years of college education. The same applies to IT jobs, like a Desktop Help Technician. One can easily learn while OJT. No engineering degree required. Jobs in marketing and admin follow the same course. Heck, even positions like an asst. manager can be learned. The requirements for years of retail experience or a four year degree make very little difference in reality- they are just hurdles to weed out thousands of resumes.

The unemployment problem has been acerbated by employers themselves.

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Comments 8 comments

soconfident profile image

soconfident 4 years ago

That is true,they could train employees for a postion but it would cost them time and money to do so, which is why they have high standards in applicants.


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

Which is being overly picky and causing unemployment to remain high. The excuse for training is always overstated in costs and times, fact is, employers are lazy many times. Just how much training does it really take for a satellite dish installer, a home security system. Probably, a few days OJT.


A K Turner profile image

A K Turner 4 years ago from West Yorkshire

Yeah, but it cuts both ways, employees need to be willing to learn new skills, I had to do a teaching assistant course to get a job and work part-time in a pub till I did, and that is a pretty low skill job. You need to start at the bottom, if that means flipping burgers then so be it. Once you have a rubbish job, you can get a better one.


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

Yes, that is true many times. The hardest thing is to get into a rut of deadend jobs and because of finances, you can't get out of. It happens very easily.


A K Turner profile image

A K Turner 4 years ago from West Yorkshire

Yeah. i got a 12 month loan to fund my education loool. I am out of it now, but I am a work-o-holic there was no way I was stopping till I got a job lloooooll


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

well, those things can work out or put you further in debt. You really must be careful about the training you seek and whether one can get a job without the experience but with education alone, which is ALWAYS dubious.


janiek13 profile image

janiek13 4 years ago from Florida's Space Coast

I think you hit the nail on the head, Perry. I have 2 degrees and cannot find a job. I was laid off in February for the very reason you just pointed out.


perrya profile image

perrya 4 years ago Author

Thanks, it certainly is adding to it.

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