Resume Writing: How to Write Job Duty Descriptions

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Describing Job Duties

The Employment History section of your résumé is the perfect place to really show a potential employer what you know and can do. Under each job heading, list the duties and responsibilities you had for that specific position. In fact, you can also list accomplishments, awards and any special recognition you received for that job.

Be bold. Highlight your abilities. Use action words as shown in these examples:

  • Prepare and distribute information packages
  • Co-ordinate weekly staff meetings
  • Create media releases
  • Interact with community partners
  • Assist customers with orders
  • Facilitate learning workshops


Emphasize your responsibilities to show a potential employer that you can be trusted with important duties. Here are a few good examples:

  • Responsible for opening and closing shop
  • Order weekly stock and receive shipments
  • Supervise new employees
  • Handle cash and debit machine
  • Maintain client list


Make your list of duties fairly detailed. Don’t assume the employer knows what duties were involved in your previous jobs, even if you’re applying for a similar job. The duties of a cashier at one company may be completely different from another, so break it down.

Here is a list of duties from my time as a Project Manager with a non-profit group.
Here is a list of duties from my time as a Project Manager with a non-profit group. | Source
© I Am Rosa
© I Am Rosa

What if I don’t have much work experience?

With today’s swiftly advancing job market, it can be intimidating to even apply for a job. Especially if you don’t feel secure about your level of education or experience. Maybe you’ve been a stay-at-home parent or have been in the same job for so long that you feel out-of-date. No worries! These are not “bad things.” They show values and loyalty. It’s simply a matter of changing your perception of yourself.

Volunteer work and community involvement says a lot about your character. More importantly, they give you something practical to put in your Employment History. Of course, if they are religion or politics related, leave them off your résumé. Otherwise, use them to show a potential employer that even without paid employment, you took responsibility and expanded your skills through other means.

Were you in charge of a fund-raiser for your favorite charity? Great! You were responsible for organizing an event, supervising volunteers and handling large sums of cash. This is valuable information for an employer looking for these skills.

You may not realize it, but you are a special employee with plenty to offer. Remember that.

The Job Hunter's Guide

This information and more can be found in my book, The Job Hunter's Guide. This easy-to-use book will guide you through your job search process, step-by-step. It includes helpful tips on:


  • Networking and Research;
  • Informational interviews;
  • Writing resume and cover letters;
  • Preparing for a job interview;
  • Interview do's and don'ts, what to expect, how to answer difficult questions; and
  • Follow-up.


The Job Hunter's Guideincludes valuable examples and is a must have for employment service agencies, labour boards, career coaches and job hunters alike.

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You can also get a free copy of Samples and References: A Companion Book to The Job Hunter’s Guide which includes worksheets and helpful checklists.

© 2011 Rosa Marchisella

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Comments 4 comments

mishel ronld profile image

mishel ronld 4 years ago from New York, NY

Hey informative hub its helpful for me.


I Am Rosa profile image

I Am Rosa 4 years ago from Canada Author

Thank you :-)


bill 4 years ago

quite nice info.


I Am Rosa profile image

I Am Rosa 4 years ago from Canada Author

Thanks, Bill!

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