Different from 50 Years Ago? Skills of Managers Today

Skills of Managers Today are Different

 “In general, management is experiencing a revolution” (Nickels, McHugh & McHugh, 2008, ¶ 13).

Why are the skills of managers today different from management skills 50 years ago? The clear distinction, aside from the obvious growth of a more accepting society, is centered on the rapid development of computer technology. Nearly five decades ago, technology altered course. Computers the size of a room were once used to manage an organization. Today however, a manager can control transactions from a mobile device. About 40 years ago, Gordon Moore made an accurate prediction. A prediction, later turned law, which can be applied to technology as an elemental forecaster of technological growth. Not only does this law merely estimate the absolute development of transistor quantities on microchips, it serves as a supporting theory to what types of skills managers need today.

“Change is now happening faster than ever, and global competition is just a click away” (Nickels, McHugh & McHugh, 2008, ¶ 13). Before Moore’s Law, manager’s rarely integrated management processes with computers. Can you imagine a manager today, lacking the skills of computer technology? How would he/she maintain pace with supply and demand? Honestly, the manager wouldn’t be able to. “Managing change is an important element of success, particularly in light of today’s emphasis on speed in the global marketplace” Nickels et al., 2008, ¶ 11). But who, in an organization, manages change? In an organization, the actions of a manager, is what defines a leader. Nikels et al. note that “A manager plans, organizes, and controls functions within an organization. A leader has vision and inspires others to grasp that vision, establishes corporate values, emphasizes corporate ethics, and doesn’t fear change” (2008, ¶ 11) Similar to the scalability of computer technology, a manager can support unexpected growth, but a leader accepts the change and seamlessly integrates his/her management skills without reorganizing the management structure or employees.

 

Management Strategies I Can Employ

Here's an example of mine

In the early phases of my partnership’s franchise venture, I plan to use eBusiness technologies to manage networking and marketing strategies. Why? Considering that the expansion of our franchise can be imminent, it can be managed; managed in such a way that structures can support the current number of users/consumers to an unexpected number of future consumers or partnerships. The importance of this, again, is scalability. Managing networking and marketing will allow our communication with publics to cost-effectively develop or be upgraded with, and to support consumer demand trends without costs to reinvent, purchase, or assemble a new infrastructure to address the tempo of users/consumers.

Observing Leadership Styles

Although my partnership is still in its growth state with a small number of employees, two evident leadership styles amongst the partners exist, autocratic – “making managerial decisions without consulting others” and participative – “managers and employees working together” (Nickels et al, 2008). As much as possible, I attempt to include partners/employees in every decision process; and therefore try to emulate a participative leadership style.

Reference:
Nickels, W., McHugh, J., & McHugh, S. (2008). Understanding business: Chapter 7: Management, Leadership, and Employee Empowerment.(8th ed.). [Electronic Version].

 

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Comments 1 comment

Jennifer Smith 6 years ago

what kinds of technology existed 50 years ago?

idk

tell me now its only until march 3,2010 and if u tell me b4 that date ill give u my wii and all of my games 2! plzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz if u don't i wont give u my wii and if u do i will give u my wii so hurry up!!!

and it has 2 be right 2!!!

so make a disigen rather u don't get my wii or u do get my wii

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