Antique Farming Plows

It was mans first occupation since the dawn of time, right after the necessity in foraging and hunting.

Firstly man only needed what the surrounding land where he called home had to offer him, but as time went by and when the human species grew in larger numbers, they were by chance forced to and gaining knowledge in cultivating the fields, as well to reduce the many migratory trips in the search for food.

That’s when farming was born. Till this day it’s still a necessary practice.

When men first started to sow seeds on the land he patiently waited for days and weeks for it to grow and months until reaping the fruit of his plantation.

We can imagine the instinct of survival that poked on mans intelligence at the time when he confronted himself in the necessity of transforming his surrounding nature to supply enough basic nourishment.

A necessary farming utensil, that could have been a digging stick or a sharp stone attached to the end of a stick was used in early times and slowly revised and tailored to a more efficient tool that became known as a hoe or a spade.

As the community was growing in larger numbers another utensil was just about to emerge due to necessity innovation and more efficient and faster land preparation that became the future of the farming plows.

This first plow was pulled by hard laboring manpower with one or two people pulling the plow, it was very hard labour and then by animals when man finally learned to domesticate and use them to their multi advantage.

Antique farming plows can still be seen around if you look carefully when you are driving around the countryside and they can make you wonder in the hardships the farmers went through in preparing the land for the next crops in former times.

In comparison with the technology available today, in which all you have to do once you get in to your newest model tractor nowadays is start it up, take it to field and in position, press a button and the GPS tracking device will make sure you are plowing precise and straight lines and you don´t veer off course.

Tough Days They Were

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Comments 2 comments

Edward  6 years ago

I have a John Deere Sryacuse Plow marked NO 2. 1878 I'm trying to find out if the NO 2. is the model or size any help with this would be greatly apreciated.

Edward


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nelson soares 6 years ago from Sunny Algarve Author

Thanks for the read Edward! Looks like you got a valuable antique farming plow!

I´ll try to find that out and let you know!

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